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Thread: Celebration FL

  1. #1
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Celebration FL

    A fresh look. Took these a couple of days ago.

    The hotel.


    A good place for margaritas.










    Another view of the hotel.


    Closed movie theater.




    Parking lot being refinished; located behind mixed use.






    Town square.




    Alley access to residential uses.




    Landscaped median.










    Another alley.






    Bank of America building.


    Another view of the median strip.




    Finally, large single-family dwellings....all facing the golf course.








    Let the slings and arrows begin.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian TerraSapient's avatar
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    I think it looks rather charming. I love all the green space, tree-lined streets, and flowers! I really don't know much about Celebration or the surrounding area, except that Celebration was built as a mixed use community in the 90s and won several awards. I've heard some criticism over its development. Really all I know about it is what I gleaned from classroom discussions in graduate school. Though I value the academic information, nothing compares to visiting and exploring. Wasn't the town built by Disney?

    What time of day and part of the week were these pictures taken - in the middle of the week or on a weekend? Do a lot of people live there RJ?

  3. #3
    Cyburbian RPfresh's avatar
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    Bank of America building.


    Not often blown away by architecture, but that is pretty cool. Other than that, looks horribly stereotypical and I think it says something that the town couldn't support a movie theater

  4. #4
    Cyburbian
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    It is pretty.

    But it's not difficult to see that the construction quality is mediocre, really, very mediocre. Wait till after ten years in a hot, humid Florida environment....

    I liked the photo of the alley. It's apparent that while it's not useless, it's not attractive, is cluttered and is cumbersome.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
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    What do people in Florida think of the "New Englandy" architecture?

    I think the constant criticism of Celebration is odd as if planners would prefer low density sprawling development. It goes without saying that it isn't going to be the same as a historic small town.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Not bad......

    Mostly looks nice. I'm sure even today those places are at the upper end of expensive. I didn't see any for sale signs in those pictures, maybe I'll check realtor.com for prices, just to see if they are still high for that part of the world.
    Skilled Adoxographer

  7. #7
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by The One View post
    Mostly looks nice. I'm sure even today those places are at the upper end of expensive. I didn't see any for sale signs in those pictures, maybe I'll check realtor.com for prices, just to see if they are still high for that part of the world.
    When I lived in Orlando in the early 2000s, home prices in Celebration were just beginning to go past the range of comfortable affordability. I looked at a small bungalow in Celebration (I think it was going for $160K), but the commute to work would have been brutal. There were other more affordable NU projects in the area, but they were also located on the opposite end of town from where I worked.

    Quote Originally posted by RPfresh View post
    Other than that, looks horribly stereotypical and I think it says something that the town couldn't support a movie theater
    The theater closed down?
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  8. #8
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by PennPlanner View post
    I liked the photo of the alley. It's apparent that while it's not useless, it's not attractive, is cluttered and is cumbersome.
    That's the point. It's not supposed to be attractive. Would you rather have all that clutter in the fronts of the houses?

    I generally like the streetscapes, especially since the landscaping has a decade of central Florida growth/maturity.
    Last edited by mendelman; 10 May 2011 at 11:22 AM.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

    Six seasons and a movie!

  9. #9
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    I was just there in April. I like the "looks", but not the "feel". It definitely has a fakeness about it. That being said, I would live there.
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Otis's avatar
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    The maturing landscaping really helps to make it nice. Were you focusing on "Colonial" residential architecture? I would expect to see more of the SE style there.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Rygor's avatar
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    I was amazed at how mature the foliage is already. Guess it's that year-round warmth and rain that makes the trees grow faster. I think now that there has been a decade or more of patina developed it looks more attractive than when I saw pics of it as brand new. The mixed-use buildings are pretty attractive as are most of the homes. I'd live there if I had a family and could afford it.
    "When life gives you lemons, just say 'No thanks'." - Henry Rollins

  12. #12
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    The mature landscaping made pictures of the buildings difficult (obviously). I didn't focus on Colonial architectural, just the buildings that I found interesting. We didn't scratch the surface. I could have spent much more time there but we we're approaching cocktail hour back at the hotel. Yes, I think I could live there, too.

    Yes, the theater is closed and for sale/lease.

    http://www.loopnet.com/Listing/14893...elebration-FL/

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    I have posted some of this info before. Despite my addiction to most things Disney, I was diappointed in Celebration. My mom and I went to the one of the earliest open houses when it first opened and the construction details in the first homes were shoddy at hest. It looks much better now. But many initial businesses have closed (well, that happens, but it includes the little grocery). It's in a horrible location for access and commute to work.

  14. #14
    Cyburbian
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    I guarantee you the only reason the cars are in the alleys is because of local ordinances preventing people from parking along the streets in front of their houses.

    I grew up in an Olmsted designed neighborhood where all the streets had service alleys.

    Very few people use them these days.

    I'm not opposed to alleys but one has to go to great lengths to get people to actually use them in modern society. The alley in the picture, by the way, is too narrow and is poorly designed. See how tricky it would be navigating the alley in your car when the trash is out? Not good. Notice that there really isn't much room for neighborhood kids to play in the alleys either (as would have been the case in the ye good ol' days)? Not good. The designers sacrificed too much of the alley to make the street front as attractive as possible, with the result that no one uses the street fronts and the alleys are too cramped to reach their potential.





    Quote Originally posted by mendelman View post
    That's the point. It's not supposed to be attractive. Would you rather have all that clutter in the fronts of the houses?

    I generally like the streetscapes, especially since the landscaping has a decade of central Florida growth/maturity.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by PennPlanner View post
    I'm not opposed to alleys but one has to go to great lengths to get people to actually use them in modern society. The alley in the picture, by the way, is too narrow and is poorly designed. See how tricky it would be navigating the alley in your car when the trash is out? Not good. Notice that there really isn't much room for neighborhood kids to play in the alleys either (as would have been the case in the ye good ol' days)? Not good. The designers sacrificed too much of the alley to make the street front as attractive as possible, with the result that no one uses the street fronts and the alleys are too cramped to reach their potential.
    I agree to a certain point. The other pics seem to not have many cars in the residential areas. By my standards however the alleys are fairly spacious to the ones I am used to, almost too much so. This allows folks to park in ways that the designers never thought of! I am intrugued by both alley pics. One is well landscaped with shrubbary and no vehicles, the other is just a mess!
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  16. #16
    Cyburbian jsk1983's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    I agree to a certain point. The other pics seem to not have many cars in the residential areas. By my standards however the alleys are fairly spacious to the ones I am used to, almost too much so. This allows folks to park in ways that the designers never thought of! I am intrugued by both alley pics. One is well landscaped with shrubbary and no vehicles, the other is just a mess!
    I thought they were spacious too. In Chicago the garages go right up to the alley and the yard is in between the house and the garage.

  17. #17
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    The other pics seem to not have many cars in the residential areas.
    In the multi-family neighborhoods, street parking was available but very tight. In the detached single-family neighborhoods, not so tight. I simply tried to crop the views of the cars from the pictures. I'll look back and see if I can find one showing the street parking situation.



    EDIT: Here's one showing typical street parking in the multi-family area. You gotta look close.

    Last edited by Richmond Jake; 12 May 2011 at 6:27 PM.

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