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Thread: Indigenous planning

  1. #1
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    Indigenous planning

    I would be interested in a forum on Indigenous Planning on this website. I think there are unique planning tools for Native American or other Indigenous cultures that might be appropriate to share.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Hmm....

    If you find anything of interest, please post it here for us to see. And when I say anything....I mean anything
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  3. #3
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    APA now has an Indigenous Planning Division, though on the website, I see little activity. One of my past professors worked to get the topic accepted as a division by APA.

    Even though I don't work directly with any tribes, Indigenous Planning issues are definitely an issue on and off the Rez around here and I know a few people who work for the Pueblos as planners.

    A few topics that come to mind:
    Economic development (casinos, crafts and cigarettes - oh my!)
    Social issues on and off the Rez (how do Native peoples view their relationships with "home," areas off the Rez and the mediation of the two)
    Public health issues on and off the Rez (management of and access to health care)
    Housing development on the Rez
    Public participation in Native communities (are there special tools, approaches or processes that are better suited to Native Communities?)
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Otis's avatar
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    We had an interesting talk at last week's Oregon Planning Institute. Eric Quaempts, Director of Natural Resources for the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, talked about a natural resource management plan for the reservation based on First Foods practices. It focuses on Water, Salmon, Deer, Cous (root foods) and Huckleberries. The idea is to manage the reservation for those foods, and everything else will take care of itself, since they are all connected to those foods.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian chupacabra's avatar
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    It's a bigger issue in Alaska than in most places, so I'm not sure how much value an Indigenous branch might have on this internet forum.

    Start some OPs and see what sort of response you get. I've got several projects cooking that include heavy native corp. elements.
    Last edited by chupacabra; 24 Sep 2009 at 7:07 PM. Reason: Me have bad grammar.
    You can grow ideas in the garden of your mind.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Woolley's avatar
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    Thumbs up for an Indigenous Forum, Equality and Anonymous Marking

    In Australia we have an issue with equality. Don't get me wrong, I know this issue is not endemic to Aus. I think the story is widespread throughout and the issues are transferable around the world. I mean don't get me wrong, as a society equality has certainly improved, but I think we become complacent and think that everything is ok for them and us.

    The Aboriginal peoples life expectancy is hovers around 50; They are not as educated; Increased crime rates; Higher rates of suicide and other various environmental injustices.

    I am all for it

    Slightly Off-topic
    Right now I am trying to muster supporters for anonymous marking at my university. As of today I have created a Facebook Group Called: Calling For Griffith University to Implement Anonymous Marking.

    If you want to check it out just search for that title. I got most of my stuff from a UK university that has these policies.

    http://lusu.co.uk/downloads/advice/a...esentation.ppt

    The ppt has a list of pros and cons. I guess it is relevant from a race perspective, quote: Statistics demonstrate similar discrepancies in regards to race, sexuality and lifestyle.


    Has anyone been aware of this concept? Many of our class believes there was and is favouritism and after course evaluations and student concerns says that he/she has favourites and marking can be subjective when our university is clearly performance based.

  7. #7
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    Australian aboriginal housing planning

    Hi,

    Just joined but am about to start some major housing projects with aboriginal communities in Australia. Would love to keep people doing the same in other countries 'in the loop'. Will keep you posted.

  8. #8
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    Indigenous Planning

    Indigenous Planning is predicated on land-tenure principles and using the distinctive worldviews of indigenous peoples to inform community. The indigenous planning framework is predicated on the establishing of a set of principles. Although it could be argued that the Indigenous Planning paradigm is a new concept, its principles are actually a reformulation of practices that have been used by Ďtraditionalí communities for millennia. Before indigenous authority had been usurped through colonial processes, tribal societies planned their communities. In addition, unlike the Western approach that relies principally upon regulating land-use, the indigenous planning approach basis its practice on dealing with land tenure.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian fringe's avatar
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    In my state of Georgia most, if not all, the indigenous populace was force-marched to Oklahoma in the infamous 1832 Trail of Tears. Ergo, those voices are not heard at all here.

  10. #10
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    EDIT: PLACE DESIGN, Welcome to Cyburbia! Sorry about the canned response you just got from the likely spammer once known as CSQTownPlanner.

    Quote Originally posted by CSQTownPlanner View post
    Indigenous Planning is predicated on land-tenure principles and using the distinctive worldviews of indigenous peoples to inform community. The indigenous planning framework is predicated on the establishing of a set of principles. Although it could be argued that the Indigenous Planning paradigm is a new concept, its principles are actually a reformulation of practices that have been used by ‘traditional’ communities for millennia. Before indigenous authority had been usurped through colonial processes, tribal societies planned their communities. In addition, unlike the Western approach that relies principally upon regulating land-use, the indigenous planning approach basis its practice on dealing with land tenure.
    Moderator note:
    If you're going to copy someone word for word, you might want to quote the source (.pdf).

    You know who else posts canned responses like that?



    We'll be doing some investigation of your post history.
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  11. #11
    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    In NYS, there has been a long history of animosity between the tribes of the former Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy and the state government, especially the Senecas in WNY. This goes back at least to the 1840s when the state attempted to send the Senecas off to Oklahoma, and in the last two decades, has been acerbated by a bitter quarrel over selling untaxed cigarettes and gasoline on the reservations. Consequently, there's deep anti-government sentiment on the reservations, and a very strong sense of not only tribal rights to self-determination but also personal property rights. Basically, the Senecas believe in and practice laissez-faire on their two Cattaraugus County reservations, and planning takes the form of where to extend waterlines, landscaping a new medical facility or building senior apartments using "casino money". As far as I know, there is no master plan and no zoning on either of the two reservations -- nor any desire for either by more than a handful of enrolled Senecas.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    EDIT: PLACE DESIGN, Welcome to Cyburbia! Sorry about the canned response you just got from the likely spammer once known as CSQTownPlanner.
    [/mod]
    Not to mention boring.

    I used to work with someone who was a tribal planner here in MI. In one case a tribe bought land adjacent to their current casino to build a new one. It was only after they had nearly cvompleted the project they realized the tribal owned land is not neccessarily the same thing as being on a reservation. For quite a while they had to connect the hotel with the old casino with a very long temporary walkway. The same tribe also opened a casino in the Center of Detroit. During its opening it went bankrupt because they were spending much more than they had, as they underestimated how much it costs to build a full 400+ room hotel, casino, and convention space. They could have used a planner.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner View post
    Not to mention boring.

    I used to work with someone who was a tribal planner here in MI. In one case a tribe bought land adjacent to their current casino to build a new one. It was only after they had nearly cvompleted the project they realized the tribal owned land is not neccessarily the same thing as being on a reservation. For quite a while they had to connect the hotel with the old casino with a very long temporary walkway. The same tribe also opened a casino in the Center of Detroit. During its opening it went bankrupt because they were spending much more than they had, as they underestimated how much it costs to build a full 400+ room hotel, casino, and convention space. They could have used a planner.
    Prior to the rise of Indian casinos, most tribal governments were like rural town/village governments -- largely amateur affairs dealing where the purchase of a $1,000 computer "system" (cpu/monitor/software) was a major investment. The federal law that allowed casinos on Indian reservations opened up a real can of worms (this is apart from the social consequences vs economic benefits arguments) because some of the tribes were simply unprepared and lacking in expertise to handle the legal and monetary aspects that come with setting up casinos.

    New York's Senecas didn't have that problem. Their frequent and numerous (and generally successful) court fights with NYS developed a lot of tribal expertise in handling legal and large-scale monetary affairs (the Senecas are still pursuing land claims in some parts of NYS based on illegal treaties forced on them by the state in the early 1800s which will probably put millions of dollars in the tribe's trust account).

  14. #14
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    Interpretive Planning with Indigenous Communities

    We have worked with indigenous people in Panama, Malaysia, China, Hawaii and Mexico in doing interpretive plans. These focus on the development of media/programs that help people understand and connect with the natural and cultural heritage of the community. It can be for tourism purposes to stimulate economic development or it can simply be about clarifying community objectives. Our approach always honors the cultural traditions and core values of the community and involves development of a logic model of measurable objectives. Resulting plans are holistic and address architecture, landscape architecture, thematic identity, communication media, programming, etc.

  15. #15
    i am also from Australia, in Melbourne where there are probably less aboriginal communities. would love to hear about these projects and their locations.

  16. #16
    Cyburbian
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    As a Canadian, where reservations are of much lower quality than elsewhere in Canada this is a very interesting thread. Also as a Winnipeger our city is dealing with the possibility of an abandoned army base become an urban reserve. Are there any other similar situations of urban reserves out there?

  17. #17
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Quote Originally posted by Pegguy11 View post
    . . . Also as a Winnipeger our city is dealing with the possibility of an abandoned army base become an urban reserve. Are there any other similar situations of urban reserves out there?
    The Puyallup Reservation in the city of Tacoma (Washington State, U.S.) is what I'd call a "success story" in urban Native American reservations.

    The Winnipeg situation may be quite different from the Puyallup, but you may want to read about the latter as a sort of starting point in your studies.

    Pegguy11, please consider starting a thread in Cyburbia's Make No Small Plans Forum---titled something like "Building an Urban Native American Reservation in Winnipeg, Canada." As a high school student, you may not necessarily have time to post a lot on this particular topic, but it's a great topic to start. The subject matter would get plenty of attention from the unusually intelligent group of planners that abound in Cyburbia.

  18. #18
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by Seana View post
    Pegguy11, please consider starting a thread in Cyburbia's Make No Small Plans Forum---titled something like "Building an Urban Native American Reservation in Winnipeg, Canada." As a high school student, you may not necessarily have time to post a lot on this particular topic, but it's a great topic to start. The subject matter would get plenty of attention from the unusually intelligent group of planners that abound in Cyburbia.
    I took your advice and made a post with some info and links about the urban reserve in Winnipeg. Thanks for that encouragement Seana! Here`s the post

  19. #19
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    At the University of New Mexico there is now an Indigenous Design & Planning Institute, whose mission is "to educate by engaging faculty, students, professionals and policy leaders in culturally appropriate design and planning practices" headed by Professor Theodor Jojola, from Isleta Pueblo: http://idpi.unm.edu/about/staff.html

    As an undergrad there, I took a class called Planning on Native American Lands, and one on Contemporary Indigenous Architecture. When I started, I had it in mind that I wanted to work with local Indigenous communities as a Planner, but I got a bit discouraged when I heard about all the red tape that goes with the added layers of government and the difficulty of gaining trust as a non-Native.

    I'm still interested in this area of practice, and especially as it relates to the Indigenous communities of developing nations. I've been wondering about how American methods of planning translate to development in countries without the technology, demographic data, and governmental/legal structures we regularly use here.

  20. #20
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by forestbwilder View post
    At the University of New Mexico there is now an Indigenous Design & Planning Institute, whose mission is "to educate by engaging faculty, students, professionals and policy leaders in culturally appropriate design and planning practices" headed by Professor Theodor Jojola, from Isleta Pueblo: http://idpi.unm.edu/about/staff.html

    As an undergrad there, I took a class called Planning on Native American Lands, and one on Contemporary Indigenous Architecture. When I started, I had it in mind that I wanted to work with local Indigenous communities as a Planner, but I got a bit discouraged when I heard about all the red tape that goes with the added layers of government and the difficulty of gaining trust as a non-Native.

    I'm still interested in this area of practice, and especially as it relates to the Indigenous communities of developing nations. I've been wondering about how American methods of planning translate to development in countries without the technology, demographic data, and governmental/legal structures we regularly use here.
    My very first graduate planning class was with Ted and he is a great thinker. He was a big inspiration for my interest in planning to begin with (I knew him prior to going to school) and he was the main proponent of the APA Indigenous Planning track as well. I agree with you that for a variety of reasons, planning on Pueblo lands or on Navajo or Apache lands has been historically lackluster. And I think you are right that the complicated relationship between the Feds and the Tribes is at the core of it. There is so much tract housing and poor quality construction that makes many Tribal housing projects look like just cheap, low cost developments in Anywheresville USA. There rarely seems to be any real integration of indigenous planning approaches at all. And yet if you visit places like Sky City Acoma or other areas where older housing prevails, you get a dramatically different feel for settlement patterns, let alone construction materials and building technologies. Unfortunately, these places are more the exception than the rule and many are only sparsely populated. Life in Indian Country is really so different from elsewhere that about all I know is that I really DONíT know 90% (or more) of what is actually going on socioculturally and religiously. Its tremendously complex. For the Pueblos in particular, its also very protective and insulated from outsiders.

    I have known a few people who have worked for some of the Tribes and I know one Pueblo in particular seems to advertise for the same planning position every year or so. Thatís an indication itís a damn hard job. It would be exciting to see more indigenous planners embracing and developing uniquely indigenous approaches to planning and development on Tribal lands. But it has to be a holistic change that includes other arenas as well, both within the Tribes (in terms of what they advocate for, expect and envision for their futures) and with the Feds (who fund a great deal of this development).
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

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