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Thread: Mr. Bill says "Ohh, nooo!!! - the coastal erosion!"

  1. #1
    Cyburbian SGB's avatar
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    Mr. Bill says "Ohh, nooo!!! - the coastal erosion!"

    All these years the people said he’s actin’ like a kid.
    He did not know he could not fly, so he did.
    - - Guy Clark, "The Cape"

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Rumpy Tunanator's avatar
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    The campaign will be launched next summer with Mr. Bill and a gang of "Estuarians" - Salty the Shrimp, Eddy the Eagle, and others - talking about the shrinking coast.
    -That's a good set of characters
    A guy once told me, "Do not have any attachments, do not have anything in your life you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you spot the heat around the corner."


    Neil McCauley (Robert DeNiro): Heat 1995

  3. #3
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    What would a campaign like this accomplish? If they are trying to tell the children about coastal erosion, what the heck can kids do about a natural shifting of coastlines which has occurred for eons.

    I know, they'll use Mr. Bill, Eddy the Eagle, et al to tell kids how to properly fill a sand bag and build an artificial barrier island. :-P

    Seems like a waste of money.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

    Six seasons and a movie!

  4. #4
    Corn Burning Fool giff57's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by mendelman
    What would a campaign like this accomplish? If they are trying to tell the children about coastal erosion, what the heck can kids do about a natural shifting of coastlines which has occurred for eons.

    I know, they'll use Mr. Bill, Eddy the Eagle, et al to tell kids how to properly fill a sand bag and build an artificial barrier island. :-P

    Seems like a waste of money.

    Ahh, but that is a very old environmental tactic. It works extremely well for recycling. The kids learn something is bad, and they nag the parents into compliance. Also, they figure that when these kids grow up, they will have a good base of followers.
    “As soon as public service ceases to be the chief business of the citizens, and they would rather serve with their money than with their persons, the State is not far from its fall”
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau

  5. #5
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by giff57
    Ahh, but that is a very old environmental tactic. It works extremely well for recycling. The kids learn something is bad, and they nag the parents into compliance. Also, they figure that when these kids grow up, they will have a good base of followers.
    True, but recycling is something kids can do now.

    How are they going to nag their parents into preventing/stopping the erosion of the land mass?

    as for making future followers, I guess, but only if the kids come to understand whether this erosion is more naturally occurring, or because of increased human impacts/runoff.
    Last edited by mendelman; 21 Jan 2004 at 11:04 AM.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

    Six seasons and a movie!

  6. #6
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Aound these parts, coastal erosion isn't considered an indicator of an impeding environmental disaster.

    The Great Lakes are extremely young in geologic terms; maybe about 15,000 years old at the most. There are high bluffs along much of the south shore (or north coast, as it's called here in Ohio) of Lake Erie. Those bluffs are continually eroding, and expensive homes are constantly in danger of falling into the lake. However, erosion is part of the process of beach-building. As the bluffs erode, sand is added to the shoreline. When there is enough sand to absorb the energy of the pounding water, erosion will stop. There isn't much sand in the soil here, though, so Lake Erie still has a ways to go before it's finished, so to speak.

    It's not global warming. It's not pollution. It's not George Bush, much as I hate to say it. It's geology, plain and simple. Erosion is a threat to expensive real estate, but bigger threats are pollution, invasive species, and illegal offshore sand dredging.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

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