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Thread: No Need To GTC: It's Toledo

  1. #76
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Toledo Lounge In D.C.

    "The (Toledo) Blade" had an interesting story in today's Sunday newspaper. The story focused on a very-successful tavern located in Washington, D.C. The name of this popular spot.....the Toledo Lounge.

    It was opened about ten years ago by a pair of Toledo, OH, women, in a neighborhood that has become "trendy".....Adams Morgan. The tavern has been picked as one of Washington's "10 best".

    The interior is filled with images of and about its' namesake city......University of Toledo pics, Muddy the Mud Hen (baseball team mascot) pic, seal of the City of Toledo, etc.

    Article indicated that it is a tough place to get in to on weekends, because of crowds.

    Interesting.

    Bear Not So Trendy
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  2. #77
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    I've been to this bar! Its a cool place. Even has a scale on display!
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  3. #78
    I heard about this many years ago, but forgot all about visiting it when I was in DC in '03. Glad to hear it was still in business.

  4. #79
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    More Toledo Stuff

    Owens-Illinois.....One of Toledo's oldest and largest Fortune 500 headquarters was located in downtown Toledo, in a 32-story glass-scraper built in the early 1980's. Today, the company.....with a shortened-name (OI) has moved to a campus-like setting, in suburban Perrysburg, OH. Today is the end of an era for the city.....although, most metropolitan folks are quite happy that the corporate headquarters stayed in the area. New owners of the handsome riverfront tower will try to fill it with smaller company digs.

    Toledo's Other Fortune 500's.....As mentioned-often, Toledo once-upon-a-time was home to a significant number of Fortune 500 headquarters. Owens-Corning Fiberglass ("Pink Panther" logo ) vacated their 1960's 30-story tower a number of years ago and relocated a few blocks away, on the river, in a campus-like setting. No tower. The old building has been empty since.

    Dana Corporation built a traditional campus-like set of buildings (looks like a college campus) out in west Toledo, across the road from world-famous Inverness Golf Course.

    All the other Fortune 500 HQ's that were in Toledo are long gone.

    Population Woes?.....Seems to me that you can simplify SOME of the logic behind the large cities that lost significant population, as reported this past week. Family size.....if you look at Toledo's 380,000 population in 1970 and divide by four you get 95,000 households. With smaller familes.....multiply that 95,000 households by 3.....the result is about what is now reported for Toledo.....285,000.

    Yeah, over-simplification.....but.....size DOES matter.

    Regional Government.....the Editor of a local (weekly) newspaper was covering for a vacationing local talk radio talk show dude. He was taking calls on the topic of regional government, un-gov, county government, etc. Lots of interesting and VERY PREDICTABLE responses.

    My take.....Toledo will get the 'burbs to jump in.....except for maybe some small stuff, such as some shared services.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  5. #80
    Quote Originally posted by Bear Up North
    Owens-Illinois.....One of Toledo's oldest and largest Fortune 500 headquarters was located in downtown Toledo, in a 32-story glass-scraper built in the early 1980's. Today, the company.....with a shortened-name (OI) has moved to a campus-like setting, in suburban Perrysburg, OH. Today is the end of an era for the city.....although, most metropolitan folks are quite happy that the corporate headquarters stayed in the area. New owners of the handsome riverfront tower will try to fill it with smaller company digs.
    Feck O-I. Sincerely. Elistist bastards. I'd rather have them move to Mexico than friggin' Perrysburg. Toledo will gain absolutely nothing from this move and only stand to lose more residents and sales tax dollars to Wood County, thus creating more sprawl and traffic congestion. At least that prick former mayer won't be able to say "No money, no comey" anymore.

    Population Woes?.....Seems to me that you can simplify SOME of the logic behind the large cities that lost significant population, as reported this past week. Family size.....if you look at Toledo's 380,000 population in 1970 and divide by four you get 95,000 households. With smaller familes.....multiply that 95,000 households by 3.....the result is about what is now reported for Toledo.....285,000.

    Yeah, over-simplification.....but.....size DOES matter.
    In 1950 Toledo covered less than 40 square miles and had a population of 305,000. Now it covers 80 square miles (they doubled their size during the annexation frenzy of the 1950s and '60s) and has less people. So the density is less than half as much, yet the traffic congestion is worse than ever.

    One wonders how bad Toledo would be off if they hadn't annexed all that land. I think it would have less than 150,000 people and a decaying infrastructure similar to Youngstown or Gary. They should have annexed the Hell out of Sylvania Township when they had the chance.

    [/QUOTE]

  6. #81
    Hey, at least the gas is cheap in Toledo

    http://www.gasbuddy.com/GB_Price_List.aspx

    At the time of this posting, third cheapest in the nation, right behind Dayton and Des Moines. ($2.64/gallon)

  7. #82
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Super Amputee Cat View post
    Hey, at least the gas is cheap in Toledo

    http://www.gasbuddy.com/GB_Price_List.aspx

    At the time of this posting, third cheapest in the nation, right behind Dayton and Des Moines. ($2.64/gallon)
    I've wondered how this could be for the last several years your gas tax is higher than ours, we are in roughly the same place goegraphically, but Toledo Gas is nearly always less expensive than it is N of the State line. My hunch is it has to do with the # of refineries and proximinty to Findley, but I could be all wet.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  8. #83
    Toledo may not have much going for it right now, but we do have the cheapest gas!

    http://www.gasbuddy.com/GB_Price_List.aspx

    ($2.216 As of 8:30PM EST - May change hourly)

  9. #84
    Cyburbian iamme's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Super Amputee Cat View post
    Toledo may not have much going for it right now, but we do have the cheapest gas!

    http://www.gasbuddy.com/GB_Price_List.aspx

    ($2.216 As of 8:30PM EST - May change hourly)
    The lowest I've seen in the Milwaukee area is 2.59, but it's dropping.

  10. #85
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    I purchased gasoline on Saturday, west Toledo, for 2.16.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally posted by Bear Up North View post
    This old Bear is not an official planner, but I can tell you things about Ohio's 4th largest city (6th largest metro).....

    In the early part of the 20th Century Toledo was in the Top 20 in population. It was growing fast. Automobile manufacturing and automobile parts manufacturing were natural follow-ups to Toledo's 19th Century position of "Wagon Capitol Of The World".

    But, something happened. A lot of the jobs.....and the people.....flocked to Detroit or Chicago. Toledo stopped growing.

    In the 1960's T-Town took on an aggressive annexation policy. Township after township was grabbed and Toledo's population started to shoot toward the 400,000 mark. The 1970's started a long demise in manufacturing jobs, which continues today.

    Toledo was the smallest city with the most Fortune 500 Headquarters. It had about seven (7).....but most of those are gone. Champion Spark Plug, gobbled by Cooper Industries. Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Company grabbed by England's Pilkington. Owens-Illinois grabbed by KKR, then sold back. Questor Corp. bought by who-the-heck remembers.

    Owens-Corning is still here, bankrupt filings and all. Toledo Scale is now in Columbus. Toledo still makes Jeeps.....for the Germans.

    Many Toledo residents moved on, mostly to those places that a lot of "rust belt America" moved to.....south and southwest.

    Those that stayed enjoyed the best and put-up-with the worst that a small metro can provide:

    Toledo residents have very little sprawl to deal with. Central Avenue in west Toledo (and Sylvania Township), the south suburb of Perrysburg, Monroe Street at the area's only super regional mall. Thus, getting around is pretty quick and easy.
    (Toledo has it's share of expressways that allow the residents relatively easy movement. Of course, they were designed with 1960's traffic projections and even a non-growing town has increasing vehicle traffic.)

    There actually are some interesting things to do in T-Town, including one (1) of the Top 10 at museums in the U.S., the most-complete zoo in America, visiting Tony Packo's restaurant (you had to watch multiple episodes of Mash to understand).

    Crime is consistent with a city of this size. A high percentage of folks own their own homes. Many areas of the actual city are very nice residential areas.

    Probably the toughest issue that Toledo folks deal with is the image of the city: Nowhere-Ville. And people like me perpetuate that line with long, rambling internet posts.

    More later about the (heh heh) "Glass Capitol Of The World".

    Bear
    I lived in Toledo for around 6 years (three of those in Waterville). I moved from Atlanta at 16. I moved to Chicago at 20 and came back at 21 until 23.

    When I came back from Chicago I wanted to find as urban an area as I could and ended up living in what I was told was Old Town across from The Old West End. I lived at Boston Pl. My land lord wanted to sell me one of the houses he owned and re-habbed very nicely. The asking price: 35,000!! (It almost might make sense to move it to a vacant lot in Chicago-where I now live again--where it would easily fetch 500K to a million depending on neighborhood).

    I was always dismayed by my friends attitudes toward their town. No one liked where they were. Most of them lived in the surrounding areas, and very few lived in the "downtown" area ("downtown" would in this sense be The Old West End"). I always remarked that the reason the city isn't any fun is because you don't live down here. They were still mystified that someone not mentally ill or borderline homeless would, by choice, live downtown.

    I remember on one of my "walkabouts" in and around the city center I came across the Bakery Building and met the woman who, with her architect husband, were rehabbing the building and turning it into apts. They'd completed their condo and one other apt. with about 6 others in the process. There was a waiting list to get in!

    Then on a return I'd learned the Macy's building was being rehabbed and actually got in to look around on a trip to Ann Arbor. The view from the roof deck was stupendous. The old Hillcrest was being rehabbed as well as a couple of other buildings too which was great news.

    I don't know why, but I've always had a soft spot for these middle size and smaller, dense midwestern cities. I'm glad to see Toledo make a go of it and hope it continues successfully.

    I think Toledo would do well to adopt something NYC did in the early 80's in places like the Lower East Side. They crafted "homesteading" programs which basically transferred title for $1 if they could prove resources to rehab and live there for 5 years.

    I'm sure Toledo has enough buildings on the tax role to give away.

    Anyway, I just found this site and am glad I did.

  12. #87
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Toledo & Wind Power

    Nice to see Toledo in the running for one of six planned wind energy test facilities. The location being pushed in Toledo is on the east side of the Maumee River, adjacent to the Port of Toledo facilities. Those facilities would provide direct water access for transporting of equipment, such as turbine blades that could be as long as 328 feet. The port has huge cranes that could handle these massive blades, easy access to the interstate highway system, and greenfield and brownfield sites just itching for new development.

    Wind farms now have turbines that range from 132 feet (such as in nearby Bowling Green, OH) to 203 feet (offshore in Europe). The facility would test and help develop the know-how to push wind energy as a great future source for the power we need.

    Another feather in Toledo's cap......the metro is home to one of the world's largest manufacturers of solar panels AND the University of Toledo has been very actively pursuing programs that run alongside renewable energy.
    _____

    A month or so ago it was proposed that Toledo build wind turbines in Maumee Bay, a normally-high-wind body of water at the western end of Lake Erie. This proposal would go hand-in-hand with the Department of Energy testing facilities that are mentioned above.
    _____

    Flyway issues.....there is a problem with the Maumee Bay proposal. The Ottawa National Wildlife Preserve is located along the shores of Lake Erie, about 20 miles east of Toledo. This is a natural landing spot for ducks and geese.....part of one of the main north-to-south flyways.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  13. #88
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    The Bridges Of Toledo

    Because of its' location along the Maumee River, Toledo has a number of river crossings. There are a few railroad crossings, including a couple that have been abandoned. The vehicle crossings.....

    Cherry Street / Martun Luther King
    This is a traditional drawbridge. It is located on the edge of downtown Toledo. When you approach the bridge you are on a major west-side-of-the-river thouroghfare, Cherry Street. From the east-side-of-the-river you are on Main Street.

    Craig Memorial Bridge
    This might be the only drawbridge that is still part of the Interstate Highway System. This bridge, I-280, is a high-traffic-density bridge. It is going to be replaced, in less than a year, by.....

    Veteran's Skyway
    Not really sure of the name of this bridge. It is a cable-stayed crossing of the Maumee River. Another famous cable-stayed brridge would be the Sunshine Skyway (Tampa Bay). This new Toledo bridge (I-280) is Ohio's largest-ever single road construction project.

    Noisy Bridge
    When we were kids (1950's) there was a 2-lane bridge that crossed the river, south of the downtown area. It was offically called the Fawcett Street Bridge but we called it "the noisy bridge", because of the loud sound that a vehicle's tires made when using the mostly-grated route.

    In the late 1950's, hurricane-force winds pushed a lake freighter into the bridge, knocking a portion of it down. The bridge was not repaired and was eventually torn down.

    Maumee-Perrysburg Bridge
    The southern metro suburbs of Maumee and Perrysburg have a brand new bridge that connects these communities.

    Ohio Turnpike Bridge
    I-80 / I-90 (The Ohio Turnpike) has a bridge that crosses the river, about 6 miles south of downtown Toledo. From this bridge the newbie-to-the-area can see the skyline of Toledo, the large homes that hug the hillsides of the river valley, and the numerous boats (in season) that play on the wide river.

    Disalle Bridge
    I-75 worms its' way through central Toledo, including crossing the river from suburban Rossford to an area just south of downtown Toledo. It was named for a former Toledoan who became an Ohio governor, Michael Disalle. It is not a drawbridge or a suspension ("high level") bridge. When it was built, grain elevators and huge sand storage areas were all closed, because the big lake freighters could not access them.

    When you are crossing the Disalle Bridge you will see the grain elevators that were on the downriver portion.....some of the largest elevators in the midwest.

    Anthony Wayne Bridge
    Those of us from the area have always called it "The High-Level Bridge". Named for General "Mad" Anthony Wayne, it is Toledo's only suspension bridge. Like all suspension bridges, it is graceful and photogenic. But old warehouses are so close to the access ramps you could almost jump on to their roofs from the bridge. The west side of the bridge doesn't blend well into the street pattern, forcing westbound drivers to turn on cross streets.

    If heading to the east, the bridge curves slightly near the base, and the road becomes a busy street, Woodville Road.

    Years ago a friend of mine was returning from a fishing expedition. His boat was on a trailer and he went around that access curve a little too fast.....his boat slid off the trailer and onto the roadway. I was not there.....but we later all had some good chuckles.
    _____

    Hope you enjoyed your tour of the main bridges of Toledo, OH.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  14. #89
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Toledo's Glass Pavilion

    Interesting news.....

    "Travel & Leisure Magazine" has named the new Toledo Musem Of Art's Glass Pavilion as BEST MUSEUM, in their March, 2007, issue. This new building, across Monroe Street from the main building, The Toledo Museum of Art, was designed by a pair of Japanese architects. In a bit of a backhanded compliment the magazine said, "This new building alone is a reason to go to Toledo, a place you might not otherwise visit."

    Because of the Toledo Museum of Art's huge (and very famous) collection of glass, this glass-walled, curved-line facility is quite appropriate, and stunning.

    In case you didn't know.....the Toledo Museum of Art is considered one of the best in the world.....and this across-the-street addition to its' campus is just another feather in a cap lined with color.

    If any Cyburbians make it to Toledo to see the new facility (and perhaps the famous Toledo Zoo.....a U.S.A. top ten zoo.....or Tony Packo's famous restaurant) give me a buzz.



    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  15. #90
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    across the street??? so that thing they were building for years across Monroe is done??
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  16. #91
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    DetroitPlanner.....Yes, the building you noticed that was under construction (across Monroe Street from the Museum) is the new Glass Pavilion. I did read a few more reviews, in national magazines and newspapers....all very positive about this structure and the impression it leaves on the visitor.
    _____

    Toledo's mayor is trying to do what so many other big city mayors try to do.....balance a budget that is ballooning. This week the mayor announced that the Fire Chief will not be replaced. The Fire Chief is retiring.....although retirement to him is taking the form of applying for the same position in Washington, DC, and in San Antonio, TX.

    The Chief of Police will assume the Fire Chief duties.

    When the news media heard this, they were wondering about the level of "fire" experience. His response was that he counts on key personnel to provide the expertise.....no matter if the business is fighting crime or fighting fires.

    I agree. In most organizations, the person at the "top" doesn't have to know the minute details. That person has to have the ability to choose (and retain) high performers and those with detailed knowledge of the specific topic.

    I don't agree with Toledo's mayor on many issues. This one I agree with.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  17. #92
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    From Monroe, MI To Swanton, OH

    Katie and this Bear were in Monroe, MI late Saturday afternoon. For those of you who have never buzzed up or down I-75, originally called The Detroit-Toledo Expressway, here's a bit of a tour.....

    Monroe, MI is more connected to Detroit than Toledo, although you reach the suburbs of either city in about the same time span. Monroe is the world headquarters of La-Z-Boy Corporation and is also the site of numerous automobile parts manufacturing facilities and headquarters. Visible from I-75 are the towers of Enrico Fermi (a nuclear power plant that was "memorialized" in a 1970s book called "We Almost Lost Detroit") and the stacks of the world's largest single user of coal for the creation of electricity, Detroit Edison's Monroe Plant.

    There is a nice little waterfront bar, on the Raisin River, just off the expressway. Be careful on the ramps.....1950s-style ramps, tight turns, etc.

    Heading south toward Ohio (18 miles away) the terrain is flat and primarily swampland.....the western end of Lake Erie. For newbies looking to view the lake from I-75.....not gonna happen. The lake is about a mile from the expressway and the swampland eventually morphs to a tree line, blocking any view of the lake.

    As you near the state line you buzz past the small city of Luna Pier. It is a lakefront community and in the past dozen or so years a number of new lakefront developments have been built. For years it was just a quiet 1920s-style resort community.

    Toledo's largest suburb is actually Bedford Township, MI. However, this trip on I-75 routes you through Erie Township, MI.....a primarily rural splotch of real estate that has experienced very little growth. Bedford Township is six miles to the west. That rural-feel ends rather abruptly at the state line.....the sound barrier walls begin right at that point, on both sides of the expressway, protecting the residential developments of north Toledo from vehicle noise.

    Those noise barrier walls will continue for a few miles, although industrial parks and railroad yards have no walls. The industrial parks are primarily new construction.....the small (aka union-free) companies that manufacture auto parts on a just-in-time basis for the huge Jeep complex that you will soon slide past.

    Alexis Road is a primary exit.....a 1970s afterthought, when Alexis Road was extended from its' former terminus at Detroit Avenue. This Bear spent some fun teen years in a neighborhood just east of this location, the Shoreland neighborhood. I-75 crosses over the Ottawa River, considered one of the most-polluted rivers in the country.

    Ottawa River Road traffic merges into the expressway, the primary entrance for most of the residents of Point Place, Toledo's lakeside neighborhood. There is a huge train yard next to the expressway, shielding your view of the north Toledo landfill. I-75 curves west at this point and this industrial highway that had 6 total lanes of traffic splits into I-280 (South) with 4 lanes and I-75 (South) with 4 lanes.

    At this junction is the huge new Daimler-Chrysler facilities, building the world-famous Jeep (and some other Dodge truck products). This huge state-of-the-art manufacturing plant replaced what was the oldest operating automobile manufacturing plant in the world, a couple miles south on I-75.

    The Jeep complex and eminent domain both were newsworthy a couple years ago, as the United States Supreme Court was looking at the specifics of how Toledo handled the eminent domain issue.

    From the junction we continue on I-75 as it winds its' way through north Toledo. From the expressway you can look south and see the skyline of downtown Toledo, a rather average collection of tall buildings. Residents of the area know that the skyline looks more spread out when viewed from the north. Most photo ops of the skyline are from the east, gathering in the Maumee River for a bottom frame effect.

    That old auto factory mentioned above? As you motor past the remains you will see that the entire collection of old buildings is being torn down. Back in World War II that complex employed 35,000 workers who helped to build the arsenal that won the war.

    Just past the old factory complex is another main junction, I-75 and I-475. If you stay on I-75 you will be on a 10-lane expressway that winds through the central city and past downtown Toledo. On this trip we merge onto I-475, now driving west.

    Just past the junction we drive between the huge Toledo Hospital complex and the old DeVilbiss High School. If you are a reader of conservative humor (from the pages of Rolling Stone or Playboy) you may recognize the name of P.J. O'Rourke. He was a mid-1960s graduate of DeVilbiss. His writings have included many a memoir of growing-up in Toledo, how sprawl has affected the community, and why The Glass City is a nice place to raise a family. (The high school was closed, due to budget cuts and declining enrollment, about a dozen years ago.)

    (Side-bar Bear historical note: When I-475 and I-75 were being built I was living in a duplex in the central city. The wife and I would ride our bicycles over to the traffic-free expressway and use it for a GIANT bike path. )

    As you motor west on I-475 you notice that the housing stock is changing from central city dwellings (very close to each other, multi-story, many apartment buildings) to 1940s brick bungalow style. I-475 is 6-lanes to 8-lanes wide in this area, although at Monroe Street the lanes are reduced. Monroe Street is one of the original sprawl avenues.....a testament to the way America embraced the automobile in the 1960s.

    Just past the Monroe Street exit is another exit, Secor Road. This exit fed the traffic at what was the area's largest non-central-core shopping district, Westgate. The Westgate area included (and still includes) Westgate Shopping Center, a couple stand-alone department stores, a big box, an office park (with low-rise and high-rise structures), and numerous strip centers.

    (Note: The center of the Westgate area still includes a full-service car wash. Think about it!)

    As you fly past the Secor Road exit the sound barrier walls continue, including a barrier at Notre Dame high School. Obviously, the traffic gurus do not want the casual traveler to check out Katie Holmes' high school.

    Housing stock changes again.....now the back yards of 1960s ranch houses line the expressway and the sound barriers are now short mounds of dirt. A ton of traffic exits at Talmadge Road, most destined for the huge regional mall, Westfield Franklin Park.

    West of Talmadge Road I-475 curves and drops into a shallow valley, surrounded by the forests of Wildwood Metro Park and the Camp Maikonda Boy Scout Reservation. Just past the tree line the road has a major junction, I-475 curves to the south and U.S. 23 is accessed by taking the northbound exit.

    We curve south, joining the busy outerbelt that is I-475/U.S. 23. This 4-lane expressway was almost obsolete before it was finished.....very heavy traffic, limited exits/entrances. Much of metro Toledo's growth has been along or near this outerbelt.

    On this trip we exit I-475 just a mile south of the junction, sliding onto U.S. 20 westbound, Central Avenue. This road, recently widened to 6-lanes to 8-lanes, is one of the busiest spawl avenues in the area. The sprawl continues for a couple of miles as you head west, finally disapating near Centennial Road.

    The route to Swanton, OH (a bedroom suburb) is rural from this point. Central Avenue (U.S. 20) motors past golf courses, Secor Metro Park, and plenty of bountiful farm land. The Swanton-bound traveler will stay on Central Avenue for about 10 miles before turning south on one of the county roads.

    Swanton, OH.....quiet and peaceful compared to the industrial city we just drove through.....is on the southern horizon.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  18. #93
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Polar Bear Rant

    The cute little polar bear in Germany was in the news again yesterday. The cuddly little guy is in the news all of the time.

    Yet.....Toledo's incredible Zoo has three.....THREE !!!.....polar bear cubs.

    Toledo's Zoo Director did not get on the national news and announce he will be killing the cubbies. Thus.....no attention.
    _____

    If you are residing in the midwest USA (or just traveling through) and you or your kids want to see three darling polar bear cubs.....check out the Toledo Zoo.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  19. #94
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Veterans Skyway Bridge

    Today was the formal dedication of the new Veterans Glass City Skway Bridge. This bridge will take the place of the drawbridge-style Craig Memorial Bridge, carrying I-280 traffic over the Maumee River, near downtown Toledo. (Not sure, but it might be the last drawbridge on the interstate system.)

    The bridge will be open for traffic on Sunday. Tonight the celebration continues, including a light show. News report attached.

    It is a nice-looking bridge. Taking some of the "wow" away is the location within a few hundred feet of the Craig Memorial Bridge.

    This summer I will try to get some Bear-inspired photos.

    http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs...EWS11/70621001

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  20. #95
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    whoops

    whoops
    i wanted to do the walk across
    oh well

    question
    how do you pronounce isha laye? i drive/ride my bike past it all the time.

  21. #96
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by lopsidedfrock View post
    question
    how do you pronounce isha laye? i drive/ride my bike past it all the time.
    When we were growing-up in our brick ranch at 3012 Isha Laye, we pronounced it as ISH AHHH LAY. The neighborhood had a large number of Jewish families and the older Jewish folks pronounced it EEEE SHAW LAY.

    We moved to the neighborhood, platted as McKondin (not sure of spelling) Heights, in about 1954. Central Avenue, just to the north of us, was a 2-lane highway. The road on the north side of Central Avenue is called Orchard Trail. In the mid-1950s we walked the farm path that became Orchard Trail.....and it really had apple trees.

    The neighborhood we moved from (at 1748 Macomber Street) eventually morphed into one of Toledo's tougher parts of town, with a big gang presence. Oddly enough, my first wife and this Bear also lived on Macomber Street, farther west (near Ottawa Park), in an apartment complex.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  22. #97
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
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    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    9,327

    Toledo In The News Again

    Toledo, OH, has been in the news again.....for a couple positive reasons.....

    Combined Sewer Overflows.....Toledo is one of 740-plus cities in the USA that have combined stormwater-sanitary sewer overflows. Any time there is a heavy rain, the sewer system cannot handle the extra flow, so raw sewage is dumped into the rivers and streams. Most of these cities are the older cities of the country.....the newer cities stayed away from this combo.

    Toledo has been getting good reviews from the EPA because voters decided in 2002 to modernize the sewer system. Five years late, good progress has been noted by the EPA.

    Best Tasting City Water Effort.....Toledo finished in the top 5 in the USA in a recent "Best Tasting City Water" contest. St. Louis finished 1st.....Toledo, Anaheim, Long Beach, and Colorado Springs were all in the top 5.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  23. #98
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Mar 2004
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    Where the weak are killed and eaten.
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    6,186
    Wow we've had major sewer separator projects going on in metro Detroit for quite some time now. Congrats on helping to clean up our lake Bear!
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  24. #99
    Quote Originally posted by Bear Up North View post
    The neighborhood we moved from (at 1748 Macomber Street) eventually morphed into one of Toledo's tougher parts of town, with a big gang presence. Oddly enough, my first wife and this Bear also lived on Macomber Street, farther west (near Ottawa Park), in an apartment complex.

    Bear
    What's weird though is the the south side of Bancroft - between Upton and Clinton is very stable. High rates of home ownership and few neglected properties. I always wondered why the Auburndale neighborhood declined so fast while the neighborhood across Bancroft (known as Parkside) remains viable.

  25. #100
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
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    Northwestern Ohio
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    9,327
    Quote Originally posted by Super Amputee Cat View post
    What's weird though is the the south side of Bancroft - between Upton and Clinton is very stable. High rates of home ownership and few neglected properties. I always wondered why the Auburndale neighborhood declined so fast while the neighborhood across Bancroft (known as Parkside) remains viable.
    Just guessing.....the Auburndale neighborhood was closer to and adjacent to Monroe Street, numerous abandoned storefronts and warehouses. Auburndale was also a traditional grid pattern, for the most part. Parkside seemed to morph (as one moves west) into a neighborhood with larger homes, grand boulevards, and the presence of a huge Catholic plot of land.....Calvary Cemetery, Gesu Church and school, and the former CYO (Catholic Youth Organizations) playing fields. Correct me if wrong.....was the neighborhood between Parkside Boulevard and Upton Avenue called "Westmoreland"?

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

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