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Thread: Tempe - No Historic Districts Here

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    Cyburbian ludes98's avatar
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    Tempe - No Historic Districts Here

    http://www.americancity.org/Archives...4/DEPT_HP.html

    Here is a little insight on a sore subject in my neck of the woods. The article talks about the lack of historic preservation and can you believe that Tempe has no historic districts? Odd for a town that was settled in 1870's and used the old (1200AD) waterways of the Hohokam Indians. The City has also had the same corporate limits since 1974 so it hasn't been growing out like most Valley cities. I actually used to live in the neighborhood discussed in the article and I ended up leaving because of the proliferation of college rental housing and poor condition of the housing stock. I had wanted to stay close to downtown, but I moved about 3 miles down the road.

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    Cyburbian Habanero's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ludes98
    http://www.americancity.org/Archives...4/DEPT_HP.html

    Here is a little insight on a sore subject in my neck of the woods. The article talks about the lack of historic preservation and can you believe that Tempe has no historic districts? Odd for a town that was settled in 1870's and used the old (1200AD) waterways of the Hohokam Indians. The City has also had the same corporate limits since 1974 so it hasn't been growing out like most Valley cities. I actually used to live in the neighborhood discussed in the article and I ended up leaving because of the proliferation of college rental housing and poor condition of the housing stock. I had wanted to stay close to downtown, but I moved about 3 miles down the road.
    One of the first things we looked into was trying to get an older home, but we were told the oldest houses out here were 1960s. I hear it's because of the heat/sun combo that did a number on the older all wood homes but there are some older places for tourism that have been saved.
    When Jesus said "love your enemies", he probably didn't mean kill them.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian ludes98's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Habanero
    One of the first things we looked into was trying to get an older home, but we were told the oldest houses out here were 1960s. I hear it's because of the heat/sun combo that did a number on the older all wood homes but there are some older places for tourism that have been saved.
    It is true that valley wide many of the oldest homes were not saved, but the population boom after WWII is the largest factor for most homes being built in the 60's or later. Try looking at an aerial of Phoenix circa 1950 (I'll see if I can find one) and almost everything you see built today will be farmland. Also historic preservation is just not a mindset people have here, probably because so much of the built environment from the 60's and 70's is ugly, blighted, or both. Tempe did a historical survey in the early 80's but only 60% of those building remain today!

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