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Thread: fog and flat

  1. #1
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
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    fog and flat

    Coming into work today, I noticed how the fog emphasized the lack of anything, including topography in central illinois.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails fog 004.jpg  
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Plus JNA's avatar
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    Are you sure you did not cross the state into Indiana?
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
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    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
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  3. #3
    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
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    I'd love to see the plains/prarie firsthand especially after seeing central Illinois from the air. Any sprawl seems so much worse when new big boxes and subdivisions are plunked down in the flat expanse of farmland with no hills, forests, or even curves in the road to break it up.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Big Easy King's avatar
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    The fog makes it look like it's a road to nowhere.
    A person who strives is one who thrives. It's GREAT to be THE KING!!!

  5. #5
    Quote Originally posted by Big Easy King
    The fog makes it look like it's a road to nowhere.

    If it is in Central Illinois, it probably is.
    "I'm a white male, age 18 to 49. Everyone listens to me, no matter how dumb my suggestions are."

    - Homer Simpson

  6. #6
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    The only thing missing is Michael Landon from Highway to Heven...

    It was foggy this morning in SW Michigan as well...
    "A long habit of not thinking a thing wrong, gives it a superficial appearance of being right, and raises at first a formidable outcry in defense of custom. Time makes more converts than reason." - Thomas Paine Common Sense.

  7. #7

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    I still remember the drive along US 24 from Fort Wayne to Peoria (Bradley University).

    I'll have you know, JNA, that Indiana at least has stands of trees. Parts of Illinois are NOTHING but industrialized agriculture.

    East and south of my current home-the Central Valley of California can be even spookier at times, though. THAT is industrialized agriculture.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Queen B's avatar
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    That could just as easily be western Kansas today
    It is all a matter of perspective!!!

  9. #9
    Quote Originally posted by BKM
    I'll have you know, JNA, that Indiana at least has stands of trees.
    JNA and I know the scenic diversity of southern Indiana. Many would not believe the topography of the place. I have steep slope zoning districts! Who could imagine that in a "fly-over" state?

    (If I weren't so damn technologically illiterate, I'd post images. Someday soon I'll figure it out.)
    Je suis Charlie

  10. #10
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
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    Exhibit #1 as to why I left the midwest to come back home to New England after college.
    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

  11. #11
    Cyburbian jordanb's avatar
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    Well, southern Indiania is in the foothills of the appalachians, so that makes sense. Southern Illinois is the same way. I honestly don't know why people would consider the prarie a "flyover zone" but the hill country not. I have a friend who used to live in Saskatchewan, but now she lives in a valley in the mountians, Somewhere in Ontario maybe?

    Anyhow, her new town looks like it could be straight out of a romance novel---a little town nesseled next to a lake in a valley surrounded by snow-capped mountians. It's very picturesque, but she doesn't like it. She said that mountians on all sides make her feel claustrophobic, and that she felt much more connected to the world on the prarie.

    I don't know how many people here have ever witnessed a big storm rolling across the prarie. It's really amazing. You can see it coming from miles away, see the clouds churning as it gets closer and closer, and see them light up with flashes of lightning, and the thunder rolling across the countryside. It's more breathtaking than any mountian. It's scary and awe-inspiring at the same time. Maybe storms on the ocean are the same, I've never seen one, but it's certanly more impressive than anything you'd ever see in hill country.

  12. #12

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    I don't know how many people here have ever witnessed a big storm rolling across the prarie. It's really amazing. You can see it coming from miles away, see the clouds churning as it gets closer and closer, and see them light up with flashes of lightning, and the thunder rolling across the countryside. It's more breathtaking than any mountian. It's scary and awe-inspiring at the same time. Maybe storms on the ocean are the same, I've never seen one, but it's certanly more impressive than anything you'd ever see in hill country.
    Overall, West Coast weather is pretty wimpy, especially inland. But, your prairie storms rarely result in 18 foot waves crashing on the shore and houses sliding down the hillsides because of mud flows

    I knew somebody in college whose family was from the Prairies (I think the really eerie Sand Hills of Nebraska). His family still felt strange in the east-claustrophobic.

  13. #13
    Cyburbian JNL's avatar
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    Wow. I am surrounded by hills or mountain ranges in every direction. Even the harbour entry is hidden behind a hilly peninsula.

    I heard a story, don't know if it's true, that an American planner was flown over here to do some consulting work for us, and he looked out the plane window and could not believe how so many houses are built on steep hillside slopes (some the only access is by cable car). Apparently he said 'Where is the flat land? I can't help you, I have no experience with this kind of terrain.' And promptly went home.

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Queen B
    That could just as easily be western Kansas today
    When I saw the picture, I thought it was Kansas.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
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    ........and here is today

    no fog, the buildings in the background are about 3 miles away.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails no fog 004.jpg  
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

  16. #16
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Holy flatland, Batman!

    I commend you central Illinoisans. I could never live in a place like that. For me, the flatness isn't that bad, but the absolute lack of any tree cover is painful.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  17. #17
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by mendelman
    Holy flatland, Batman!

    I commend you central Illinoisans. I could never live in a place like that. For me, the flatness isn't that bad, but the absolute lack of any tree cover is painful.
    don't get me wrong, we have trees here. clumps on farmsteads, around creeks and rivers and old strip mines. But otherwise..none or very, very few.
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

  18. #18
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    I just discovered that boiker sorta beat me to the 'most boring state' idea by several years.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  19. #19
    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    I just discovered that boiker sorta beat me to the 'most boring state' idea by several years.
    For it would have to be one of the Great Plains states; North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska or Kansas. The supposed Midwest states that really aren't.
    When did I go from Luke Skywalker to Obi-Wan Kenobi?

  20. #20
    Cyburbian dvdneal's avatar
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    I like to rank Kansas as boring, but more because of the lack of interesting cities than the topography. It's basically rolling hills of wheat so at least the roads go up and down a little. Indiana sounds more of the flat boring state, but at least the have Indianapolis.
    I don't pretend to understand Brannigan's Law. I merely enforce it.

  21. #21
    Cyburbian jsk1983's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by dvdneal View post
    I like to rank Kansas as boring, but more because of the lack of interesting cities than the topography. It's basically rolling hills of wheat so at least the roads go up and down a little. Indiana sounds more of the flat boring state, but at least the have Indianapolis.
    Indianapolis isn't too exciting for a city its size. Indiana at least has a little bit of coast line on Lake Michigan and the dunes.

  22. #22
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    What?

    That John Denver was full of S#i%!!
    "The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness."
    John Kenneth Galbraith

  23. #23
    Quote Originally posted by jsk1983 View post
    Indianapolis isn't too exciting for a city its size. Indiana at least has a little bit of coast line on Lake Michigan and the dunes.
    It was called India no place for a long time for a reason.
    When did I go from Luke Skywalker to Obi-Wan Kenobi?

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