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Thread: Get Urban! My New Book

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally posted by Gedunker
    Greetings from a third tier city across the Mighty Ohio from a second tier city and 609 river miles from yet another second tier city.

    Anyone that advocates for city-life is a-ok in my book.

    My 0.02: the neighborhood elementary school is 4 blocks from my house in the heart of the city (and its oldest residential district), yet my kids would get on a bus and ride out of this school district, through a second district to attend a school 6.5 miles from my house. No other kid in the city travels more than 1.5 miles to their elementary school and very few in the county travel farther (we are the second smallest county in area in Indiana). After elementary school, the kids from that school district would go on to one middle school, while my kids would get shipped to a different middle school (so no friends from school when they matriculate at the new school). All because the inner-city does not have the pull to get the county elementaries re-districted so that we could attend our neighborhood school. Heaven forbid county kids should go to school with kids from the urban milieu. (The school could use some kids from our neighborhood -- it is one of the poorest scoring schools in standardized state tests.)

    For this reason (among others, to be honest) my kids attend Catholic school. I am fortunate that I can afford to send them, but there are many that cannot and I think this serves as yet another dis-incentive to revitalizing the inner-city.

    Anyway, good luck with the book and enjoy Cyburbia.
    Thanks for the luck.. Instead of selling, tonight I will engage without mention of said book (althought still tremendously excited about April!). Thanks!

  2. #27
    Cyburbian Rumpy Tunanator's avatar
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    Welcome aboard , I see part of your book covers part of Buffalo. I live close to where you'll be hawking your book, so I'll have to stop by and harrass you

    I don't know if you've read any of this authors books, but there pretty good i.e. Mark Goldman, High Hopes: The Rise and Fall of Buffalo New York.



    Still more are clueless that this city provides an affordable and wonderful urban place to thrive. Buffalo and Elmwood Village are about to be "found out."
    Its already been found out, and we don't need anymore yuppies here driving up rent
    A guy once told me, "Do not have any attachments, do not have anything in your life you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you spot the heat around the corner."


    Neil McCauley (Robert DeNiro): Heat 1995

  3. #28
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by KyleEzellGetUrban
    Thank you back. that quote was on the money! Indeed, we Americans may not want to be urban.
    Again, it is hard to say what individuals actually "want" when the entire home-buying industry is so biased in support of single-family suburban homes to the exclusion of all else. Co-housing is something of a trend and it has promise for creating walkable communities, but it has to be boot-strapped for financing. It is extremely hard to include "affordable" housing in a co-housing development when present reality dictates that it can only get developed by people who have more resources than average -- not just more money but more education, more connections, more organizing ability, etc.

  4. #29
    Cyburbian Big Easy King's avatar
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    Welcome and greetings.
    A person who strives is one who thrives. It's GREAT to be THE KING!!!

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally posted by Rumpy Tunanator
    Welcome aboard , I see part of your book covers part of Buffalo. I live close to where you'll be hawking your book, so I'll have to stop by and harrass you

    I don't know if you've read any of this authors books, but there pretty good i.e. Mark Goldman, High Hopes: The Rise and Fall of Buffalo New York.





    Its already been found out, and we don't need anymore yuppies here driving up rent
    Hi, Turnanator. Nah, no more yuppies, but your lovely Buffalo (yes, Buffalo is lovely, wonderful, beautiful) must get more people to fall in love with it's superior urban qualities-- How many people has it lost? Half its population over a few decades? See you in April then.

  6. #31
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Boiker, More Off Topic
    Quote Originally posted by Repo Man
    I think that 75 percent of the problems with urban public schools are related to bad parenting, and 15 percent bad teachers, and 10 percent budget related. My mom has taught in the inner city for over 30 years and has watched as a majority of parents don't even show up for conferences, don't call back when teachers call them about problems, and don't give a crap if their kids do homework. Then they whine and cry when their kid gets failing grades. The correlation between parent(s) who care and good grades is very strong. Many parents (inner city and suburbs) expect schools to do everything. For some people, Home Schooling may be an alternative, but I think that if a kid has parents (or a parent) that works with them and makes sure they do homework as well as extra curricular reading and other learning opportunities, they will succeed academically.
    Repo, I'll give you a report back in 10 years. My wife and I have decided to give public inner city schools shot. My rationale? The programs that are available to these kids in this 'bad' school system makes my 'good' safe quiet rural school seem like the bad school. Additionally, we are devoted to our children and will be active in every step of my kids acadamic career.

    I compared the stats of the bad, inner city schools with the primary, middle and high school that I attended and the stats were virtually identical. In fact, my schools tested worse than the bad, urban schools in a number of subjects. The biggest obstacle that I can see with sending my kid to the urban school is keeping his head on straight so he doesn't get involved with kids with poor work ethic, social problems and criminal problems. But isn't that an obstacle at all schools?

    Home schooling is a very real possibility if the schools don't work out. I only fear that with home schooling, social development could be stymied. Perhaps Michelle will ease my fears.
    Welcome to the forums!
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

  7. #32
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    Totally OT: Homeschooling et al

    Quote Originally posted by boiker
    Home schooling is a very real possibility if the schools don't work out. I only fear that with home schooling, social development could be stymied. Perhaps Michelle will ease my fears.
    lol. You might not want my opinion. Some homeschoolers are rabidly anti-school and of the opinion that schools make for "bad socialization" and homeschooling is far superior. But, of course, it depends a lot on the family and other particulars. I am not rabidly anti-school but the longer my kids are out of school, the more sympathy I have for those who are. If you have special-needs kids who simply do not fit in, school can be an extremely negative social experience and homeschooling can be "the only hope" for positive socialization for such kids. My kids fall in that category, especially my oldest child. They have much more of a social life as homeschoolers than they ever had in public school.

    It is something of a myth that school teaches "socialization". It is a well-researched historical fact that public school as we know it was founded to train kids to be good factory workers -- to get in line, stop and start their work in response to a bell going off, etc. Literacy rates went Down after public school was introduced. It's express purpose is to train kids to fit in to "the system" and NOT to teach them how to Think. Original thinking is dangerous and is often seen as "antisocial". Galileo was put in jail for daring to think. Socrates and Jesus were put to death, if I recall right (I could have the details as to why they were sentenced to death wrong -- I am not big on such types of history). When public schools were created, some of the people who created them expressly stated that the upper class kids would NOT go to public school and would get a "real education", to prepare them to RUN countries and factories, etc, whereas public school was specifically intended to churn out drone factory workers and "dutiful citizens" who did as they were told.

    I never intended to be a homeschooler. Like many families with twice exceptional kids, I arrived at the decision under enormous duress due to a horrible school situation and few viable alternatives (we were on a military base 39 miles from the nearest town). It was supposed to be a "temporary measure" until we moved again. I found out a lot about my oldest child -- who had utterly baffled the schools -- AFTER we began homeschooling and realized he would never go back to school. My youngest child had liked school prior to arriving at the horrid school and we did try putting him back in school after we moved. He lasted 3 weeks before he begged to come home again. Sigh.

    But, I do know people who homeschooled during a crisis and then successfully stuck their kids back in school. And I also know people who do "part-time schooling" in school districts with sufficiently flexible policies. And some parents/families are not a great fit for homeschooling. I know someone with a twice exceptional child who is presently in a crisis school situation who is looking at their options and homeschooling is at the bottom of their list for personal reasons. Their preference is to either find a job someplace else where the schools are better or find a good private school.

    My kids just aren't a good fit for ANY school, public or private. I do my best to not become rabidly anti-school because I know people on all sides of the issue. But I am in a forum with a guy who happens to be the publisher for the book about "dumbing down" the schools and he is rabidly antischool and seems to be on a mission to have the public school system dismantled. I always thought he was kind of a Nut (ie "his views were extreme" -- that is not intended as slander). But just yesterday I consciously refrained from jumping into a thread that was dissing public schools because I found myself sounding an awful lot like those Rabid Nuts who are so anti-school. Sigh. And then I went to his website for the first time. I did not know he was the publisher of John Gatto's book until yesterday. But it makes perfect sense.

    But that is probably TMI, isn't it?
    Last edited by Michele Zone; 08 Mar 2004 at 10:28 PM.

  8. #33
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    welcome!

    Your book sounds cool.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  9. #34

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    Quote Originally posted by Repo Man
    I think that 75 percent of the problems with urban public schools are related to bad parenting, and 15 percent bad teachers, and 10 percent budget related. My mom has taught in the inner city for over 30 years and has watched as a majority of parents don't even show up for conferences, don't call back when teachers call them about problems, and don't give a crap if their kids do homework. Then they whine and cry when their kid gets failing grades. The correlation between parent(s) who care and good grades is very strong. Many parents (inner city and suburbs) expect schools to do everything. For some people, Home Schooling may be an alternative, but I think that if a kid has parents (or a parent) that works with them and makes sure they do homework as well as extra curricular reading and other learning opportunities, they will succeed academically.
    This happens in wealthy suburban school districts even more. My sister knows a teacher in a reknowned Marin County (average home price $750K) high school where the attitude is "How dare you required my spoiled brats to actually do any school work." I'm not sure a more modest school of the striving middle class/working class would be better than a purportedly high quality school in a place like Mill Valley.

    Of course, as I am childless, I have no room to speak.

  10. #35
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by BKM

    a place like Mill Valley
    How do you get to Mill Valley? All the signs are gone! Would the school bus drivers know where to go?

  11. #36
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    That's Bolinas you're refering to. It's out on the coast. Residents there remove all signs directing or identifying the town.

    (900 clube with this post )

  12. #37
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Two weeks to go to April 8th...

    $13.27 on Amazon with a 50,469 sales rank.

    At that price, I might as well as buy it from Amazon.

    Hey Dan, is Kyle Ezell's book on the Cyburbia Amazon Associates program? I'll buy it if it is.

  13. #38
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Wanigas?
    Two weeks to go to April 8th...

    $13.27 on Amazon with a 50,469 sales rank.

    At that price, I might as well as buy it from Amazon.

    Hey Dan, is Kyle Ezell's book on the Cyburbia Amazon Associates program? I'll buy it if it is.
    Let us know what you think of it. Should it be in the library?
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  14. #39
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Wanigas?

    Hey Dan, is Kyle Ezell's book on the Cyburbia Amazon Associates program?
    Anyone see this book on the Cyburbia/Amazon partnership list?

  15. #40
    Quote Originally posted by Wanigas?
    Anyone see this book on the Cyburbia/Amazon partnership list?
    From what I understand, as long as you click on the Amazon link on Cyburbuia, you can buy anything from Amazon (books, cds, movies, etc) and that percentage goes to Cyburbia. It is not restricted to Dan's list.

    Someone correct me if I am wrong.
    "I'm a white male, age 18 to 49. Everyone listens to me, no matter how dumb my suggestions are."

    - Homer Simpson

  16. #41
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Repo Man
    From what I understand, as long as you click on the Amazon link on Cyburbuia, you can buy anything from Amazon (books, cds, movies, etc) and that percentage goes to Cyburbia. It is not restricted to Dan's list.

    Someone correct me if I am wrong.
    That's how it works. I've bought 2 XBox games through Amazon to funnel funds to Dan. :-P
    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

  17. #42
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    I received Get Urban! in the mail yesterday. Looks great! I read the intro, that's it so far, but still looks like an excellent book. I like the writing style, its practical approach, and it appears to be a more accessible and friendlier guide than a book like Suburban Nation. I will give more details - if anyone is interested - once I have read it all.

  18. #43
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Wanigas?
    I received Get Urban! in the mail yesterday. Looks great! I read the intro, that's it so far, but still looks like an excellent book. I like the writing style, its practical approach, and it appears to be a more accessible and friendlier guide than a book like Suburban Nation. I will give more details - if anyone is interested - once I have read it all.

    sounds good!

    give us a book report when you're done.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

    Six seasons and a movie!

  19. #44
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    This is what the Cyburbia Book Club needs - more shameless promotion!

    Looks like Kyle was way ahead of us when he started this thread. I wonder, does he ever lurk in Cyburbia anymore?

    If a mod sees it appropriate, how about moving this thread to the Cyburbia Book Club?

  20. #45
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Wanigas?
    If a mod sees it appropriate, how about moving this thread to the Cyburbia Book Club?
    Moderator note:
    Done.
    .................
    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

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