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Thread: A career in planning?

  1. #1
         
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    A career in planning?

    Hello everybody!

    As a Geography student I enjoyed researching and reading about issues in urban development or planning. But as a student my written English has badly let me down in the past. My disseration was full errors in grammer and the structure was weak. I'm dslexic and I wish to pursue a career in planning and i feel nervous as some of my acadmics were wary of my English! Furthermore I've been told that planning is very much based on written commcation.

    what do you think?

    andrew

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    I homeschool my gifted-learning disabled kids. Dyslexia is not one of the things we deal with. But: have you heard of a book called "The Gift of Dyslexia"? People with dyslexia and certain other "handicaps" of that sort have brains that are simply wired differently. They literally and figuratively have a different view of the world. If their differences are honored and respected and the obstacles dealt with in a practical manner, I see no reason why you can't go into any field you love. You may have to be creative and open-minded about the exact job you end up doing. But the world needs that "different view" on things -- sometimes that is the only view that can save a situation.

    You might want to surf my homeschooling website: Michele's World of (Twice) Exceptional Homeschooling This may not be the right forum for your question. You may need to seek out people with expertise in how to live successfully with handicaps rather than people who have "conventional" success. Another source of inspiration might be EASI: Equal Access to Software and Information, run by a guy who works full time as a college professor and promotes internet access for handicapped people in his "spare time". He also happens to be blind, which makes him highly qualified to advocate for visually and otherwise impaired people.

    Feel free to write me privately. I have no expertise in dyslexia but I have loads of expertise in living the life of your dreams in spite of handicaps. My genetic disorder wasn't diagnosed until I was almost 36. I have had a very full life.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Writing is important to most professions, but many people succeed in these without being excellent writers. If it does present such a problem to you, there are avenues you could pursue in planning that are more graphically-oriented. We deal with drawings, maps, etc. You might look to these as your forte.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  4. #4
    Cyburbian SGB's avatar
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    In this age of computer applications to assist the disable, there must be software out there that can assist dislexics with written communications.

    I wouldn't let your dislexia disuade you from a planning career. I say: Go For It!
    All these years the people said he’s actin’ like a kid.
    He did not know he could not fly, so he did.
    - - Guy Clark, "The Cape"

  5. #5
    maudit anglais
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    Quote Originally posted by SGB
    I wouldn't let your dislexia disuade you from a planning career. I say: Go For It!
    Agreed - I think that, unfortunately, anything you want to do that requires a university education will require extra effort on your behalf to succeed. I know that the uni I attended had a very good "special needs" department that assisted students with various learning disabilities in completing their assignments, exams, etc.

    Good luck!

  6. #6
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Andrew,
    If you really really want to be a planner and are willing to do whatever it takes to become one, I strongly suggest you pursue the course of action MZ recommends, you owe it to yourself. There are many ways of successfully compensating for (what many people consider) disabilites and they are too numerous and involved to get into here.

    Being able to communicate in writing is very important to planners. If, however, you are seeking the path of least resistance, you may wish to play to your strengths and perhaps look into pursuing cartography or some other area that places less emphasis on writing skills. Good luck in your search.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    I have a friend who is a professional writer. She has Multiple Sclerorosis and uses "Dragon Speaking Naturally" to do most of her work because of her physical limitations. She simply can't type for long periods. (She also charges something like $80 and up per hour. *Cough.* She tells me I write very well and should charge similar. I wish!)

    My oldest son, who thinks in pictures and was more than a year below grade level for writing skills when we pulled him from school and whom I had to send to preschool at age 3 to FORCE him to speak when he was a year behind in speach development, has decided to become a writer. It is a really long story, but, in spite of the fact that he has difficulty remembering anything in "words" and "words" aren't very real to him, he expresses himself beautiful and is very witty. I am helping him overcome some of his obstacles to pursuing this as a career. One of the things he has to do is talk through his ideas. That works much better for him than writing it down. The actual written word is incredibly hard for him to relate to in a way. It is just too abstract. But if you would like to read a sample of his work, pm me and I can ask him again for the url to where on the web some of his stories are being published. He really "writes" well in that he is creative and eloquent and very funny. But the act of writing is a huge problem, including severe dysgraphia. He types with 2 fingers -- at about 60 words per minute.

    How much do you want to bet that Stephen Hawking did not actually physically "write" all of his published books? Have you ever heard him in an interview??? Only close associate's of his can understand his speach these days. Helen Keller was similarly impaired and had to have a 'translator' speak for her. She spoke English but learned it as a completely deaf and blind person. Her pronunciation wasn't exactly "standard" English.

    Many people who have difficulty with the actual writing process use tape recorders or other methods for bridging the process between thinking through their ideas and actually getting it into final written form. When you have serious writing issues, you have to learn to separate the part of it which is "content" and the part of it which is mechanics. I am acquainted with people who have no ability whatsoever to spell yet have advanced college degrees. Their kids now proof-read their papers. They cannot spell to save their lives but they are brilliant. "That's what spell-check is for".

    Then, after that, you also need to decide if it is "worth the effort" or if something 'easier' would be more comfortable for you. My oldest son is brilliant at science but SUCKS at math. He is fortunate to have a Math Geek for a mom who really knows how to teach math (and has been ASKED many times when I am going to write a math book ) and I have managed to teach him some math in spite of the fact that he is downright "retarded" in that subject. I did it in part so that he would have a CHOICE: if he really and truly loves physics so much that he desperately wants a degree in it, he could go to college and pursue that. The math requirement would be a killer but not necessarily a show-stopper. He has decided he isn't that motivated. I can't blame him. I ruled out Civil Engineering as a degree because I am not fond of Calculus. That is part of why I expect to pursue a Master's in Planning and Development Studies.

    But, again, "something easier" may be a matter of job choice rather than career field. It is not a black and white, all-or-nothing question. Things rarely are.

  8. #8
    I think you'll make a great planner. You can work with dyslexia, I have three friends who have it and all are functioning above average in the professional world. Like SGB said GO FOR IT!!!!!!

    I hear that once you commit your soul to planning many great things come your way

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by The Irish One
    I think you'll make a great planner. You can work with dyslexia, I have three friends who have it and all are functioning above average in the professional world. Like SGB said GO FOR IT!!!!!!

    I hear that once you commit your soul to planning many great things come your way
    Uh, yeah: what he said!
    I have never been "succinct". That is a pitfall of being a visual-spatial thinker. I get ribbed a lot in all online forums that I belong to about being so long-winded and rambling. We all have our shortcomings that we have to wrestle with. I can write eloquently -- if I do a brain dump and then 3 or 4 edits and chop half or more of what I originally said. Even "good" writers have to work at it.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Plus
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    I agree with all the above comments.
    MZ is right - about multiple drafts and editing.
    I current pressing project is updating the Comp Plan - in house.
    Any one section has been written/edited/proofed by at least 4 people.
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

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