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Thread: Old WVU grad that went on to planning school

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Dec 1997
    Location
    Huntington, West Virginia
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    >>>> There's nothing more annoying than trying to explain to people, who are
    >>>> totally clueless, what I'm studying in graduate school: "So what are you
    >>>> getting your master's in? - "Urban and Regional Planning." - "Uhh, what's
    >>>> that?" - "City planning." - "So what do you do, like plan cities?" - "No, it's
    >>>> more than that. We seek to implement changes in the in cities and
    >>>> neighborhoods so that they can become better places to live and work. We
    >>>> work with historic preservation, economic development, land design,
    >>>> transportation, those sorts of things." - "Oh. Uhh that's nice." - "(Sigh)Yes,
    >>>> we plan cities."

    >>>> Most of the graduate students I know encounter the same kind of
    >>>> conversation and I'm pretty sure planning professionals hear it as well.
    >>>> Granted the field is not as commonly known as law or medicine, trying to
    >>>> explain it is still annoying.

    >>> I hear you on that one. I am a fellow graduate student and have given the
    >>> same stock response as you have many times to fellow people. i am sick of
    >>> saying city planning. We have to re educate the masses on this one.

    >> Hello, I am a recent graduate in geology from WVU and am interested in city
    >> planning. Would I have to return to undergrad to pick up more classes before
    >> going to grad school. What are some good schools in this discipline? I need
    >> some guidance. Please respond.
    Andrew,

    I graduated from WVU also in Landscape Architecture (72) and then went to Planning Master degree at UVA. Many schools do not require courses in the field of planning to move through the masters program. Of course the more classes in the social sciences and physical sciences that you have, the better. If you were a physicist or a neurosurgen you would be at a disadvantage, but geology is not a big problem for a masters in planning. Give it a try, you'll like it.

  2. #2

    Old WVU grad that went on to planning school

    In response to: Old WVU grad that went on to planning school posted by Gus Drum on December 08, 1997 at 21:02:02:

    >>>> There's nothing more annoying than trying to explain to people, who are
    >>>> totally clueless, what I'm studying in graduate school: "So what are you
    >>>> getting your master's in? - "Urban and Regional Planning." - "Uhh, what's
    >>>> that?" - "City planning." - "So what do you do, like plan cities?" - "No, it's
    >>>> more than that. We seek to implement changes in the in cities and
    >>>> neighborhoods so that they can become better places to live and work. We
    >>>> work with historic preservation, economic development, land design,
    >>>> transportation, those sorts of things." - "Oh. Uhh that's nice." - "(Sigh)Yes,
    >>>> we plan cities."

    >>>> Most of the graduate students I know encounter the same kind of
    >>>> conversation and I'm pretty sure planning professionals hear it as well.
    >>>> Granted the field is not as commonly known as law or medicine, trying to
    >>>> explain it is still annoying.

    >>> I hear you on that one. I am a fellow graduate student and have given the
    >>> same stock response as you have many times to fellow people. i am sick of
    >>> saying city planning. We have to re educate the masses on this one.

    >> Hello, I am a recent graduate in geology from WVU and am interested in city
    >> planning. Would I have to return to undergrad to pick up more classes before
    >> going to grad school. What are some good schools in this discipline? I need
    >> some guidance. Please respond.

    > Andrew,
    > I graduated from WVU also in Landscape Architecture (72) and then went to
    > Planning Master degree at UVA. Many schools do not require courses in the field
    > of planning to move through the masters program. Of course the more classes in
    > the social sciences and physical sciences that you have, the better. If you were a
    > physicist or a neurosurgen you would be at a disadvantage, but geology is not a
    > big problem for a masters in planning. Give it a try, you'll like it.
    Andrew: I too am a WVU alumn. I graduated in 87 with a B.A. in Geography, though I started out in Geology. I went on to get a masters in public administration, because it is a more diverse field. If you're going into public management of any kind (say - a planning directorship), the MPA is a great choice. Just make sure you take some elective planning classes at some point. If you choose the Masters in Planning, you should do well too... The hardest thing about planning from a learning standpoint is statistical analysis. Geology majors are usually pretty good in math though.

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