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Thread: NYC, NYU and planning

  1. #1
    Kobayashi's avatar
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    Mobile, Alabama
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    NYC, NYU and planning

    I've lived in L.A., Lower Alabama that is , my entire life. I've lived in this automobile dependent hellhole for far too long. My lifelong dream has been to live in NYC. I dream nightly of living in a pedestrian friendly society, where one can realistically sell their car and never have to get behind a wheel again. Studying NYC and realizing how screwed up the cities are down here, motivated me to go into planning. This is where the problems start to arise. How do you get a planning related job in a city with nowhere near the planning problems faced down here in the south?

    Also, I've never really wanted to work in the public sector, but of course with my first few jobs, I won't be picky. My question is, if by some lucky miracle, I were to get accepted into NYU, what would be my post-graduate chances of finding a planning related job? How much would my NYU degree help me in finding a job in NYC?

    If were to attend graduate school at USC or Portland St., how much harder would it be for me to get a job back on the east coast?

    If one were to want to live on the east coast, is it advised to attend a graduate program on the east coast?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by Kobayashi
    My lifelong dream has been to live in NYC. I dream nightly of living in a pedestrian friendly society, where one can realistically sell their car and never have to get behind a wheel again. .
    I think there are a number of cities on the west coast where this is the case, Portland being one of them, though I think LA is not one of them. The San Francisco bay area (particularily the east bay, Berkeley, etc) has great public transportation as well. If you're looking for a pleasant, pedestrian-friendly place to live (and study urban planning), I wouldn't limit your prospects to New York. I can't answer your other questions too well, but the impression that I've gotten from other posts in this forum is that the location of your school is not that important to where you can find a job later.
    Last edited by giff57; 17 Dec 2004 at 8:50 AM.

  3. #3
    Kobayashi's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by urbanleopold
    Quote Originally posted by Kobayashi
    My lifelong dream has been to live in NYC. I dream nightly of living in a pedestrian friendly society, where one can realistically sell their car and never have to get behind a wheel again. .
    I think there are a number of cities on the west coast where this is the case, Portland being one of them, though I think LA is not one of them. The San Francisco bay area (particularily the east bay, Berkeley, etc) has great public transportation as well. If you're looking for a pleasant, pedestrian-friendly place to live (and study urban planning), I wouldn't limit your prospects to New York. I can't answer your other questions too well, but the impression that I've gotten from other posts in this forum is that the location of your school is not that important to where you can find a job later.
    I know there are more pdestrian friendly areas outside of NYC. I realize the benefits of San Fran and the west coast, but I prefer a cold weather climate. I love snow, I love the cold weather, and the earthquake thing just freaks me out

    Someone told me "It's impossible to find a planning job in Portland", meaning the planning market was fully saturated.

    I'm not limiting myself to just NYC, but NYC is where i've always wanted to be, so that is the goal.
    Last edited by giff57; 17 Dec 2004 at 8:51 AM.

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