Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: AutoCAD Certificate?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Who cares.
    Posts
    1,038

    AutoCAD Certificate?

    Seeing some of the other threads reminded me of something I've been meaning to ask the Throbbing Brain for a while: how many of you use AutoCAD, or find it to be useful? A local university offers certificates and Associate's Degrees in computer drafting etc, and I've been thinking about doing one or the other. It's a pretty big commitment in terms of time and money, and I only want to take on more student loan debt if it will pay off in future, although learning AutoCAD sounds like fun....So, thoughts? Suggestions?
    I don't dream. I plan.

  2. #2
    Suspended Bad Email Address teshadoh's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    Posts
    427
    Why not study GIS? Unless you are involved with urban design or landscape. But for planning purposes I would think GIS would be more beneficial.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
    Registered
    Sep 2001
    Location
    skating on thin ice
    Posts
    6,958
    I go through periods of using AutoCAD and long periods where I don't need it.
    I am glad I took it in university, however, I learned on version 10(primarily line driven) and we are at the equivalent of version 16 or 17 (windows driven).

    I don't think a full certificate is necesarily required to do our job on a daily basis. A few courses, and an ability to visualize line weight and space is all you really need. I can't remember the last time I had to 3D Face an object then create a block, with attributes then insert it and extract the attributes to another file for compilation and review.

    For complex drawings and mapping I have staff that look after it for me. It has helped having a good knowledge of what it can do and how to do it when I speak to the techs.
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  4. #4
    Cyburbian DecaturHawk's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    In the palm of the mitten
    Posts
    880
    I agree with Donk. I self-taught myself AutoCAD (also using rel. 10) some years back while working for a Chicago suburb. As GIS has become more a part of my work, I spend much more time creating maps in ArcMap. We still use AutoCAD here, but it is used mainly by engineering techs who are reluctant to move on to a different technology. Since AutoCAD is a mega-featured drafting program, in your planning practice you will rarely use more than say, 40 percent of its features. So if you get a good self-teaching manual and learn the basics, you will probably know all you will ever use without the time and expense of a certificate program. I also agree with teshadoh, you are probably better off using that time and effort in GIS. Good luck!
    SOME say the world will end in fire, Some say in ice.
    From what I’ve tasted of desire
    I hold with those who favor fire.
    But if it had to perish twice, I think I know enough of hate
    To know that for destruction ice
    Is also great
    And would suffice.

    Robert Frost (1874–1963) (From Harper’s Magazine, December 1920.)

  5. #5
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Down by Dun Ringill
    Posts
    5,897
    Blog entries
    6
    When I got out of grad school and was looking for a job, I took an AutoCad class, hoping it might make me more employable. Five years later, I have never used it even once.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Doitnow!!'s avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2003
    Location
    India
    Posts
    499
    I never took formal training in Autocad but have been using it regularly from the last eight years or so.
    Although the latest version is AutoCad 2005 I am still working on 2000. Its a very useful tool for map making. Mostly architects and engineers use it for planners it's a very useful map making/vectorisation tool. In fact most of my work on GIS starts after I create and edit maps in AutoCAd.
    AutoCad is useful for planners too as many popular GIS packages do not have the vector map creating module.
    All my subdivision plans are made in Autocad. You can also make Text sheets and add images using AutoCAd.
    IF you think you can learn it on your own then thats the best way todo it but better take some guidance form an expert as it will save you time.
    IF a formal certificate course will help your employment profile only then it's worth doing it.
    Also it depends on how much time and money you can afford on it. If there are constriants then better find someone who knows the software well( and its various commands and applications) and start off at home or in office( if that can be done).
    "I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them".
    -Isaac Asimov

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 7
    Last post: 17 Apr 2012, 11:14 AM
  2. Why do planners need AutoCAD when...
    Career Development and Advice
    Replies: 3
    Last post: 24 May 2007, 11:20 AM
  3. AutoCAD Certification????
    Student Commons
    Replies: 3
    Last post: 18 Oct 2006, 10:57 PM
  4. Autocad vs. GIS
    Student Commons
    Replies: 32
    Last post: 28 Aug 2006, 1:44 PM
  5. I Need Autocad Assistance
    Design, Space, and Place
    Replies: 2
    Last post: 27 Oct 2003, 7:34 AM