Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 23 of 23

Thread: Studying New Urbanism

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    19

    Studying New Urbanism

    Right now I am studying Urban Design at the Architecture Department of the TU Delft in the Netherlands. I somehow got interested in New Urbanism, mainly because of the more human side of this design discipline, and the special care it takes in designing the public space. The best place to study this discipline is in the US. But.... where should I go? Most of the American courses are aimed at Urban Planning, not at Urban Design. I like planning, but I am mainly focused at the design of the urban built environment. Since I aim to finish my Bsc degree this semester, I am looking for a master course somewhere.

    New Urbanism is of course teached at Miami University, but it seems to be taught at the architecture department there, and not even in a special New Urbanism course. But I was thinking maybe one of you guys/girls knows something about a good Urban Design department somewhere?

  2. #2
    Kobayashi's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    92
    If you like New Urbanism i highly suggest subscribing to the New Urban News which can be found at www.newurbannews.com

  3. #3
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Someplace between yesterday and tomorrow.
    Posts
    12,455
    I would also recommend reading Suburban Nation... It gives allot of examples of New Urbanism.

    As for schools, I am not sure. Some say that the term New Urbanism is overrated. I think that most schools that have Urban Design Schools and Professors who are up on the latest trends will offer classes relating to the principles. I also think that if you looked into other related terms such as Traditional Neighborhood Design or Smart Growth, they all have the same general idea and platform.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  4. #4
    Member
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    19
    Thanks Michaelskis, I was planning on reading the book. But is it only about suburbia, or also about urban infill, which is the subject I am mainly interested in right now?

    Also, when most schools have the same sort of view towards NU, which ones could you recommend? I took a look at Ann Arbor, it should be good, but maybe you know schools that are better?

  5. #5
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Staff meeting
    Posts
    8,208
    Quote Originally posted by kickert
    ...I took a look at Ann Arbor, it should be good..?
    I recommend the University of Michigan - College of Architecture and Urban Planning (TCAUP).

    I received my Master's of Urban Planning (MUP) from there and at the time the Master's of Urban Design (MUD) was a new program, but it will be a good place to study. The faculty of the Urban Design program is taken from the Architecture and Urban Planning program, and is the best synthesis of Arch. and UP. The faculty is well know and well reagarded, and Douglas Kelbaugh, a huge NU proponent, is the dean of TCAUP.

    If you have any other questions about UM-TCAUP, let me know.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

    Six seasons and a movie!

  6. #6
    Member annie's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    39
    Many schools also offer a specific urban design certificate, which you can get after a masters in planning or architecture. Both Berkeley and University of Washington have planning programs emphasizing design, and also specific certificates.

    As to New Urbanism being overrated, I got my undergrad at Yale, and both Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zybek are alums. I had a friend who, for his senior project, tried to debunk New Urbanism. He did NOT fare very well in reviews!

    At this point, I don't think that many people are doing specific New Urbanism. The new hot topic is Active Living By Design.

  7. #7
    Member
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    19
    Hi everybody. I really did make a nice entrance here, my introduction post has been closed .

    I have recently decided I am going to take a look at American universities in real life. I will take an airplane to Florida, rent a car, and drive around the East Coast, looking at how universities work there. I am still interested in New Urbanism, but I think I will skip Miami university. But I do want to visit Ann Arbor, and Chicago. So it's going to be quite a trip...

    I am travelling in the first half of June, are the universities still open by then? And more important, do any of you have suggestions which universities to look at, while travelling around the East Coast? 2 universities aren't exactly much...

  8. #8

    Registered
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Solano County, California
    Posts
    6,468
    Quote Originally posted by kickert
    I am travelling in the first half of June, are the universities still open by then? And more important, do any of you have suggestions which universities to look at, while travelling around the East Coast? 2 universities aren't exactly much...
    East Coast: You may want to look at University of Virginia. Actually, anyone intereseted in architecture should look at the University of Virginia to see the campus. I remain convinced it is one of American architecture's highest accomplishments.

    University of North Carolina is also an excellent planning school.

    Depending on how widely you are travelling, you might want to check out University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. And, I was impressed with the University of Cincinatti's programs (a much smaller, less famous university)

  9. #9
         
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    37
    Quote Originally posted by kickert
    do any of you have suggestions which universities to look at, while travelling around the East Coast? 2 universities aren't exactly much...
    Definitely check out UPenn (in Philadelphia), Harvard Graduate School of Design and MIT (in Cambridge). These schools all incorporate urban design into the graduate planning programs they offer. Also on the east coast, Georgia Tech in Atlanta has a good urban design concentration. Atlanta is about a 10.5 hour drive from Philadelphia, which is nabout 6.5 hours from Boston/Cambridge. You could also travel by train (Amtrack) but it is expensive and the regular trains are slower than driving. The high-speed Acela is more expensive.

  10. #10
    Member
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    19
    Thanks a lot, all of the universities you guys/girls mentioned are on the route, except for MIT. My university has an exchange program with this university, sadly enough there are more people wanting to go there than people being allowed to go . Isn't Rem Koolhaas a teacher there (maybe take a look at my introduction post)? I will take a look at the other ones though.

    Since I have a rental car there, it isn't necessary to take a train. But do you think I can make it from Florida to Chicago in two weeks, with some stopovers at universities and friends?

  11. #11
         
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    37
    Quote Originally posted by kickert
    Thanks a lot, all of the universities you guys/girls mentioned are on the route, except for MIT. My university has an exchange program with this university, sadly enough there are more people wanting to go there than people being allowed to go . Isn't Rem Koolhaas a teacher there (maybe take a look at my introduction post)? I will take a look at the other ones though.
    Rem Koolhaas teaches at the Harvard GSD (Gradaute School of Design), which is about 5/10 minutes from MIT. Both schools are across the Charles River from Boston. You should apply to both of those schools. Don't miss Boston!!!!!!!!!!!! You should have enough time. (All the major east coast cities are fairly close together, except for Atlanta and Miami.) You might want to drive west from Boston to Chicago and hit up Buffalo along the way. Buffalo was planned by Joseph Elicott in 1804. His brother Andrew designed Washington, DC along with L'Enfant. Olmsted later designed the Buffalo park system and its parkways.

    Two weeks might be cutting it close, but don't leave out Boston.

  12. #12
         
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    New York, New York
    Posts
    20
    Alas, it seems that Rem Koolhaas' tenure at the GSD is a bit of a running joke on students there, since he's never there. Current students have told me that they occasionally take pictures of his name plate and post it around. Very few people seem to have met him in his capacity as a faculty member.

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Dharmster's avatar
    Registered
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Arlington, Virginia
    Posts
    436
    Quote Originally posted by kickert
    The best place to study this discipline is in the US. But.... where should I go?
    But why do you want to come to the US? Most of the country is a wasteland from a urban design perspective?

  14. #14
    Member annie's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    39

    Harvard and New Urbanism

    Quote Originally posted by rmulrew
    Definitely check out UPenn (in Philadelphia), Harvard Graduate School of Design and MIT (in Cambridge). These schools all incorporate urban design into the graduate planning programs they offer. Also on the east coast, Georgia Tech in Atlanta has a good urban design concentration. Atlanta is about a 10.5 hour drive from Philadelphia, which is nabout 6.5 hours from Boston/Cambridge. You could also travel by train (Amtrack) but it is expensive and the regular trains are slower than driving. The high-speed Acela is more expensive.
    For specific "new urbanism" (which I think is losing steam as it is no longer "new"), from what I remember, Harvard is slightly opposed to the new idea (Alex Krieger is the most vocal opponent). I of course, don't remember his exact argument, but New Urbanism was coined by Yale grads...and maybe that's the problem!

  15. #15
    Member
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally posted by Dharmster
    But why do you want to come to the US? Most of the country is a wasteland from a urban design perspective?
    I want to broaden my vision on urbanism. New Urbanism has it's origins in the US, and is a design discipline that catches my attention and support lately. Typological orders (street, road, square) and a more 'traditional' vision on how cities (should) work, are a warm welcome. A lot of people regard today's cities as 'dead', and promote the global network city in its place. For example Virilio.

    In a world with growing globalisation and de-urbanisation, people need a 'place', a home. Network city enthusiast sometimes seem to forget this. A lot of people at my architecture department are Koolhaas fanatics, talking about whatever happened to Urbanism. Typical architect's talk, defending their profession against 'nosy' urban designers.

    It is really a question of design paradigms. I want to broaden my vision on this subject. Right now I have a project in a Dutch Modernist neighbourhood. A lot of concrete slabs, surrounded by parking fields. More or less like in the US I guess . But when I decide to turn this neighbourhood in a more condensed 'place', my teachers tend to wake up. The TU Delft, where I study, has been a Modernist architecture department for years.

    The US does indeed seem to be an urbanist's nightmare. But imagine a country like the Netherlands, where every square mile has been 'thought of' in a more or less urban way. It's different, at least the US has a lot of problems to solve. I like challenges .

    I hope you understand it a little bit, the story might seem a bit vague...

    Anyway, I have changed the travel schedule to an arrival in New York JFK (seems to be a terrible aiport btw?) staying in the big apple for a few days, and moving on with a rental car for about three weeks. Suggestions are still very welcome!

  16. #16
    Member
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    19
    Well, right now the trip is being planned more thoroughly. I am going to New York at the end of May, then I will go to Boston to see Harvard / MIT, after that I will be staying in Ann Arbor for a few days. This place seems to be the most interesting of all the places right now, so I will spend some time there.

    After Ann Arbor I will go to see Chicago and UIC. Then I will drive back to Washington DC, stay for a couple of days over there, and head back to New York. So I am planning to see the Urban Design departments of Harvard / MIT, Ann Arbor, UIC and maybe the university of Cincinatti. Are universities a bit welcoming, or don't they like foreign students walking around in their buildings?

    Mendelman, you told me a few posts ago that if I needed to know more about Ann Arbor, I should ask. Well, I am very interested in knowing what to do when I'm there... . I will be staying there for about 3-4 days, so what are interesting things to see/ do there, apart from looking around TCAUP? I'm asking this because I'm also interested in how students live in Ann Arbor, since I might be studying there...

    Of course, other suggestions about my trip to the other universities are also very welcome.

  17. #17
    Member
    Registered
    May 2004
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Posts
    2
    so what are interesting things to see/ do there, apart from looking around TCAUP? I'm asking this because I'm also interested in how students live in Ann Arbor, since I might be studying there...
    I'm a current student in the MUP program at UM. Have you set up something to meet faculty or anyone on campus?

    Will you be able to drive around at all? If so, I'd actually recommend going to Detroit (a lot of coursework in the program is focused on Detroit, for "big city" experience), as well as trying to drive around some of the outlying townships, which are a mix of small cities & towns, rural areas, and the occasional weird New Urbanist commuter village.

    In Ann Arbor, there's not a ton, but there's two downtowns, a mostly student one and a mostly town one which are both nice. (Not entirely functional, but good for eating and upscalish shopping for non-essentials.) A student neighborhood sort of off from the two that you'll want to take a look at.Parks.

    I'm kind of a bad tour guide. Is there anything specific you're interested in? (Re-reading your message: as long as you're around during a weekday, there shouldn't be any problem looking around the building.)

  18. #18
    Member
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    19
    Thanks for the info. I have a rental car there, so I will be able to drive around. I have called TCAUP, and made an appointment for June 1st. May the 31st is Memorial day, so I guess I will be looking around town, and maybe driving to Detroit then...

    I will be staying in Ann Arbor for about three days, so one day for the town, one for the university and one for... don't know yet, but I'll find it out there .

  19. #19
         
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    37
    Quote Originally posted by kickert
    After Ann Arbor I will go to see Chicago and UIC. Then I will drive back to Washington DC, stay for a couple of days over there, and head back to New York. So I am planning to see the Urban Design departments of Harvard / MIT, Ann Arbor, UIC and maybe the university of Cincinatti. Are universities a bit welcoming, or don't they like foreign students walking around in their buildings?
    Research the faculty in these departments, and schedule to meet with those whose research interests you. Also contact current students and plan to meet with them as well. A book you might want to check out is "The Profession of City Planning: Changes, Images and Challenges 1950-2000." Many prominent faculty are featured in the book. Also plan to read any books and essays of the professors you plan to meet.

    When you are in DC, you should check out the recent redevelopment of Clarendon (in Arlington County, Virginia) and Bethesda and Silver Spring (in Montgomery County, Maryland). These neighborhoods all have self-titled Metro rail stops. All three feature new large-scale mixed use/transit oriented developments. I believe this would interest you. There are a number of neighborhoods you should try to visit in DC: Capitol Hill, Georgetown, Downtown (it's redevelopment), Dupont Circle, Logan Circle. Upper Northwest (this includes Cleveland Park and Chevy Chase. Plan to drive up Connecticut Avenue--it is a beautiful boulevard lined with DC's finest apartment buildings of the art deco and art moderne eras. Also, plan to visit nearby Old Town Alexandia, a masterpiece of 18th century planning.

  20. #20
    Member
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    19
    Thank you for the suggestions! I will take a look at Washington DC, I will be staying there for a while.

  21. #21

    Dont Miss Ball State

    Don't miss Ball State in Indiana. It has a great design college which emphasizes the cross disapline study of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture/Urban Design. We had a professor come to vist Iowa State's Planning Students to talk about Ball States graduate programs and traveling studios...since Iowa State has a well known and respected Landscape Architecture Traveling Studio. I currently am a Senior at Iowa State with the same interests as yourself. Do not limit yourself to strict planning programs. There are colleges that offer urban design masters which incorporate studies in the New Urbanism (TRADITIONAL PLANNING!)...Iowa State just had a pilot course on New Urbanism and it was one of the best classes I have ever taken. It was listed under the department of landscape architecture. So I repeat, do not limit your search to schools with plannign programs. Look at LA programs as well. There is a fine line when dealing with design and professional careers.

  22. #22
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 1996
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    7,598
    Quote Originally posted by salomondesignboarder
    Don't miss Ball State in Indiana. It has a great design college which emphasizes the cross disapline study of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture/Urban Design.
    Woo hoo a free plug for my alma mater....and it didn't come from an alum!
    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

  23. #23
    Member
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    19
    Hi everyone,

    I have just returned from my trip to the US. Things never go as planned, so I was only able to visit 4 universities: Harvard, Umich, UIC and Columbia. The Michigan University intrigued me the most. The Urban Design program over there is fairly new, but people are really doing a fine job thinking about cities and their design. The school also has a New Urbanist feeling.

    But... I wasn't able to visit Notre Dame, MIT or the University of Maryland. That's really too bad. Maybe next week, when I have more spare time, I can tell you more about my trip.

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 6
    Last post: 02 Sep 2011, 4:47 AM
  2. Job in planning while studying
    Career Development and Advice
    Replies: 1
    Last post: 25 Dec 2010, 11:17 AM
  3. Replies: 18
    Last post: 17 Apr 2009, 10:53 AM
  4. All my studying paid off
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 31
    Last post: 04 Jun 2004, 3:43 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last post: 05 Dec 2002, 10:06 AM