Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Do you make beer?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Someplace between yesterday and tomorrow.
    Posts
    12,116

    Do you make beer?

    Master was cool enough to give me a brew kit, and I was wondering if anyone had any good recipes for different types of beer, or if they have any links to some.

    Off-topic:
    I tried to post this once before, but I was informed that we can not make an never ending beer thread. I thought it might be a good idea if all the beer topics could be consolidated into one thread as opposed to adding new threads to talk about beer. But they can change this one into a “never-ending” if the feel that if the justified. If you feel that this should be a never-ending thread being it is a never-ending toppic, please make it known. Thank you
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  2. #2
    I have been brewing beer on and off since 1992. Right now I am in an "off" stage but I am hoping to start up again soon. If you like pale ale, I have a recipe that I believe is better than 90 percent of the Pale Ales out there. It was given to me by a brewing supply store that is no longer in business and it produces a very hoppy ale with an almost creamy texture. I am getting thirsty just thinking about it.

    This site is pretty good - they also have clone recipes so you can try to make your own batch of your favorite microbrews.
    "I'm a white male, age 18 to 49. Everyone listens to me, no matter how dumb my suggestions are."

    - Homer Simpson

  3. #3
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    on my 15 minute break
    Posts
    17,689
    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis
    Master was cool enough to give me a brew kit
    Master ? I think Michaelskis , you are allowing your subconscious/intuitive perceptions to come to the surface.

    I can of, course, hook you up with all sorts of homebrewing books, recipes, websites, etc. but I'm guessing Duke or maybe some others here might also have some tidbits to pass along.
    I'll just say for all Cyburbian's benefit that Charlie Papazion's (sp?) book 'The New Complete Joy of Homebrewing' should be your first stop along the path of homebrewing knowledge/wisdom and enlightenment.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  4. #4
    Cyburbian el Guapo's avatar
    Registered
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Samsara
    Posts
    5,075
    Me Brew Sunday-Sunday-Sunday: Wheat beer.
    9 weeks til a little bit of liquid heaven.

    Agreed on the book recommendation, additionally "Home Brewing for Dummies" truly is an excellent Beginner-Intermediate tome.

  5. #5
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Jukin' City
    Posts
    16,438
    I do not make beer (I'll leave that to the experts) I drink beer.
    RJ is the KING of . The One

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Duke Of Dystopia's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Cyburbias Brewpub, best seat in the haus!
    Posts
    2,663
    My favorite book is named "Designing Great Beer".

    It is not a how to book, but rather it is for when you have your system down and you are mashing from all grain rather than the malt syrup kits.

    It has no recipies, but it goes through the details in how to design a beer by taste to style, listing all ingredients, history of the style, how it is used/produced by home brewers, the present commercial process, and changes in that style over time.

    Description: Daniels. This book teaches you how to design recipes. There are so many bad recipes out there and too many times beginning brewers select recipes based on how good the original brewer makes it sound. For example, the name of a recipe says India Pale Ale, but the ingredient list dictates Pale Ale. This is a great resource that is long overdue. The book starts out with in-depth information on malt, yeast, hops and how to choose the right ingredient for the beer you are making. Then subsequent chapters follow up with information on beer styles. Each style chapter contains data from actual recipes that have won awards at the AHA national competition. A must have if you are thinking of entering beer in a competition.

    It is my beer making bible.

    Also, if you are going to brew beer, you want to spend the $25 dolars and buy the "Pro-Mash" beer designing software. You will hit your taste and ingredient profiles right on the head. Its a thing of beauty!
    I can't deliver UTOPIA, but I can create a HELL for you to LIVE in :)DoD:(

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Rem's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NSW, Australia
    Posts
    1,530
    I brew at home using commercial worts (syrups). I prefer Lagers but am still working my way through the many alternative options available. Coopers (an Australian brand) is probably my favourite lager.

    I have many recipes for replicas of commercial brews and have tried a few. I have recently bottled a brew using a Kilkenny recipe - I am happy to send the recipe on to anyone interested in it. It will be a little while before I can give it a review though as it's winter here at the moment and things brewing take a little longer.

  8. #8
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    on my 15 minute break
    Posts
    17,689
    Duke reminds me of an important homebrew issue. The ol' extract vs. all grain debate; Which is better for the novice homebrewer? Brewing from extract is simpler and relies on less equipment. I can see where the simplicity aspect might be enticing for a first-timer (my first brew was an 'amber ale' extract). The trouble is, though, that brew made from extract will always tase like brew made from extract. It's simply not as good tasting as a well crafted all-grain and it occurs to me that this fact or result might be discouarging for many beginning homebrewers. On the other hand, while an all-grain brew can potentially produce a superior taste, it involves more equipment, time, labor and expertise and that might also be discouraging to someone starting out. What are others' thoughts on this?
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Root beer
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 21
    Last post: 05 Aug 2014, 7:01 PM
  2. Anyone here drink beer?
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 12
    Last post: 23 Nov 2004, 9:26 AM
  3. For the love of beer-
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 0
    Last post: 20 Jul 2004, 4:12 PM
  4. You don't know jack about beer
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 8
    Last post: 30 Oct 2003, 3:00 PM
  5. blood for beer
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 6
    Last post: 27 Oct 2003, 10:21 AM