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Thread: Immigration Trends in Canada

  1. #1
    maudit anglais
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    Immigration Trends in Canada

    Interesting article in today's Globe and Mail.

  2. #2
         
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    Quote Originally posted by article
    Frank McKenna, New Brunswick's former premier, predicted this year that Atlantic Canada will face a "long, slow and tortuous" decline unless it attracts more immigration to the region.
    Why are the maritime provinces so unpopular? I haven't had the opportunity to visit that area yet, but it seems to be almost a sidenote in the landscape of Canada.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally posted by valhallan
    Why are the maritime provinces so unpopular? I haven't had the opportunity to visit that area yet, but it seems to be almost a sidenote in the landscape of Canada.
    Likely a combination of the the limited employment opportunities throughout Atlantic Canada and the lesser degree of cultural connections as compared to the big three in Canada.

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    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by valhallan
    Why are the maritime provinces so unpopular? I haven't had the opportunity to visit that area yet, but it seems to be almost a sidenote in the landscape of Canada.
    Having recently moved from the Maritimes, the probable reason is that it is a very homogenoues society(white protestant/white catholic / french catholic) with very set boundaries on expected and tolerated behaviors. Skin a different colour, celebrate different holidays, speak with an accent you'll have a hard time adjusting / fitting in / being accepted.

    There are a tonne of other reasons that make the majority of the region unpopular also.......

    BME and JMF might have some insight.

    Also remember that the KKK was active in some areas until the mid 80's and NB's flirtation with the COR party
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

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    Cyburbian jmf's avatar
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    I think jobs and support networks are a big part of why immigrants do not come to/stay in the Maritimes. As Donk pointed out many communities are homogeneous, often the same cultural make-up as 150-200 years ago - although I would argue in NS, at least, that crosses cultural lines. For example, there are distinct pockets of African-Canadian settlements here in NS, the same way French-Catholics (Acadians, mostly) can be found in certain areas.

    Also in some communities there are specific reasons why certain cultures are found there, for example in Industrial Cape Breton there are significant jewish, lebanese, italian, polish settlements since these people came to work in the mines or steel mill. It is sometimes strange that in the land of Macs and Mcs there are all sorts of Giacomantonios etc!

    In Sydney and Halifax, as well as some of the university towns, there are more resources for immigrants from places of worship and the social connections which come with them to stores which carry specific types of food.

    As for jobs, there are fewer here than in the larger centres. In addition, often immigrants have to do some much work to have there expertise recognized here in Canada that perhaps it is easier to do that in bigger cities. I must admit it drives my crazy to hear that qualified doctors are driving taxis, or whatever, because it is so hard to get accreditation here, especially at a time when we need more doctors in rural areas.

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    Hmm, I guess I just always thought the Maritimes would quite naturally build up and have at least one major city (bigger than Halifax) due to their eastern location and aesthetically pleasing geography (imo).

    It seems growth trends in the U.S. generally occur in areas with strategic locations and/or natural beauty. For example, Massachusetts Bay, Chesapeake Bay, Puget Sound, San Francisco Bay, etc.

    Are the Maritimes' harbors just not convenient as ports for the rest of Canada?

  7. #7
    Cyburbian jresta's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by valhallan
    Are the Maritimes' harbors just not convenient as ports for the rest of Canada?
    No thanks to NAFTA what's convenient for the rest of Canada is almost irrelevant.
    We're working on an ITS/Port system for the I-95 corridor from, essentially, Halifax to Norfolk, VA. Even our more regional work, for instance our Port Inland Distribution Network (PIDN) that we're doing with the Port of NY/NJ takes traffic from Halifax and Norfolk into account.

    Baltimore and Philly have well developed ports but they're relatively far from the open ocean. I don't know what's going on down in Baltimore but every time i drive to DC all i see are ships with the front end opened, full of shiny new cars. Philly has settled into breakbulk and its niche of fruits and other perishables and foodstuffs. You might remember the well developed refrigeration complex from the first Rocky movie. It works but it's the sort of industry that only grows as fast the nations' waistlines.

    Halifax, in addition to being a lot closer to Europe is right out there in the Atlantic with ships able to travel to West Africa and Brazil just as easily as they can to England or the Netherlands. The same is true of Norfolk. New York is in a similar position but space and intermodal connections are major issues as almost 90% of freight leaves NY by truck (hence the PIDN study to barge stuff from NY/NJ down to South Jersey, Philly, and Connecticut).
    Indeed you can usually tell when the concepts of democracy and citizenship are weakening. There is an increase in the role of charity and in the worship of volunteerism. These represent the élite citizen's imitation of noblesse oblige; that is, of pretending to be aristocrats or oligarchs, as opposed to being citizens.

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    They didn't mention Halifax specifically, but it's doing fine. A lot better in fact than many larger cities, both in terms of attracting immigrants and in terms of overall growth. Right now Halifax's population is growing as quickly as Vancouver's. They rarely mention that in these articles though.. and just vaguely mention "the Maritimes", as if the economic realities in every part of the region are the same. Nobody would lump Toronto in with Timmins.

    Small towns are never going to attract many immigrants. The only chance for the Maritimes to avoid the "torturous decline" (which, by the way, has been going on for about 130 years now) is for it to focus on its cities. Halifax and Moncton are growing and Saint John could no doubt be doing better than it is. The problem here is that a massive amount of time and money is being wasted on rural areas that are just never going to be successful on their own. Even the immigration policy here in NS is designed to get people to move to places like Canso at the expense of Halifax and it's just not working.

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