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Thread: Driving to school

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Driving to school

    Well, if this isn't a great example of bad planning (on the part of the school, community, etc.) then I do not know what is.

    http://www.enquirer.com/editions/200...loc4fairf.html

    "'Don't walk' is the warning Fairfield Police have issued to the 2,300 Fairfield Senior High School students who won't have bus service when classes begin Wednesday. Busing was eliminated for grades 9-12 in a budget cut after two levy failures since March.

    No sidewalks were built along North Gilmore Road or Holden Boulevard when the $25.6 million school opened in 1997. The city doesn't require sidewalks in the area - a policy called outdated by at least one City Council member."

    I wonder how much they spent to put in parking lots for the school. Oh well, those are so much more important than sidewalks or bus service.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  2. #2

    Registered
    Oct 2001
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    Solano County, California
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    That is one thing my employer does right-we always get sidewalks, even when the whiners say they are not necessary.

    Our third high school (new) is in an industrial park, but at least it is immediately next to a big residential community-and it is theoretically possible to walk (although low densities, distance, and proclivities towards laziness and pride of car ownership make it unlikely).

  3. #3
    Cyburbian H's avatar
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    Feb 2003
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    C: Its probably those planners' fault. why didnt they ask for side walks?

    P: Well we did Mr. Commissioner, dont you remember sir?

    C: Dont sass me...
    Last edited by H; 25 Aug 2004 at 9:32 AM.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
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    Mar 2004
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    Appleton, Wisconsin
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    Quote Originally posted by Cardinal
    Well, if this isn't a great example of bad planning (on the part of the school, community, etc.) then I do not know what is.

    http://www.enquirer.com/editions/200...loc4fairf.html

    "'Don't walk' is the warning Fairfield Police have issued to the 2,300 Fairfield Senior High School students who won't have bus service when classes begin Wednesday. Busing was eliminated for grades 9-12 in a budget cut after two levy failures since March.

    No sidewalks were built along North Gilmore Road or Holden Boulevard when the $25.6 million school opened in 1997. The city doesn't require sidewalks in the area - a policy called outdated by at least one City Council member."

    I wonder how much they spent to put in parking lots for the school. Oh well, those are so much more important than sidewalks or bus service.
    Wisconsin towns are notorious for this, too. The sprawling unincorporated suburban areas in the Appleton/Fox Cities metro area are a REAL eye-opener in that regard. The general refrain when I have ever suggested adding them is "THE TAXPAYERS CAN'T AFFORD IT!!!"

    I wonder if anyone has done a cost-benefit study comparing the cost of installing and maintaining sidewalks and owning, operating and maintaining a fleet of school busses for 50 years (a reasonable service life for a typical sidewalk square), with the assumption being that areas with sidewalks generally don't need school busses. One of the problems here, though (at least in Wisconsin), is that the sidewalks are installed by the municipality while the busses are paid for by a completely seperate school district (usually covering more than one municipality), a classic case of passing costs off onto someone else.

    An added benefit of sidewalks is that they are available for anyone to use on a 24/7 basis, while school busses are only used by a select group of individuals at very limited times (but try explaining that logic to the town boards...).

    Mike

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    Jul 2003
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    San Diego, CA
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    And if the family is not well-off enough to have the luxury to drive the kid to school or buy them a car?? It sounds exclusionary to me.

  6. #6
    spokanite's avatar
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    May 2004
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    The other Inland Empire
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    Quote Originally posted by mgk920
    An added benefit of sidewalks is that they are available for anyone to use on a 24/7 basis, while school busses are only used by a select group of individuals at very limited times (but try explaining that logic to the town boards...).
    I made a visit up to Greenbelt, Maryland the other day and it happened to be a Sunday when no transit ran from the Metro station to the town. I walked home on the way back, and was surprised to NOT see any sidewalks as you began heading out of the central, older part of the town, just beyond the original gas station. It literally forced me to walk out into oncoming traffic. A few feet down the road you could see where people had decided it was safer to move onto the shoulder and walk along side traffic...even though no sidewalk was there. Later on, an asphalt path appeared on the other side of the road that eventually led me back to the Metro.

    Heading back to the Metro


    Proof of irritated pedestrians

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