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Thread: The NEVERENDING Wine Thread

  1. #76
    Cyburbian plankton's avatar
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    Henry's Estate Pinot Noir made in Umpqua, Oregon is my favorite. I'm biased 'cuz I was married there, but if you have a chance to drink this one, go for it, you won't be disappointed.

    Sideways -- I'm still laughing......

  2. #77
    Cyburbian sisterceleste's avatar
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    Sung to the "Green Acres" Theme song of the 70s

    Blue Nun is the wine for me.
    Cheap, cheap as it can be.
    Sweet, sweet as a wine can be.
    Blue Nun is the wine for me.
    You darn tootin', I like fig newtons!

  3. #78
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    I am glad RJ and I both like really dry wines. I have absolutely no knowledge about wines and can't remember the names of any of them, but he brings down some really good wines when he visits.

    Blue Nun?

  4. #79
    Cyburbian
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    I rarely drink wine now... small bottles are rare and the regular 750 cc (1.6 pints) bottle is way to much for just 1 and it'll end as vinegar...

    Down here my parents just drink middle ranged priced wine. It's good although most of the Chilean vineyards of that price range are not exported, they produce enough to fulfill local demand. Only big vineyards that produce great volume or have remarkable quality get exported. Besides for a market like the US you can't export in little volumes, unless it's for a specific local provider.

    Oh and before I was bashing Gato, but I guess that what get's exported is the best of the best of what that huge vineyard (Viña San Pedro) produces, and us locals get the worst...but still they're focused on volume rather than quality. (No, I haven't heard that they add anti-freeze so you can drink it without any problems )

  5. #80
    Cyburbian tsc's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by SkeLeton

    Oh and before I was bashing Gato, but I guess that what get's exported is the best of the best of what that huge vineyard (Viña San Pedro) produces, and us locals get the worst...but still they're focused on volume rather than quality. (No, I haven't heard that they add anti-freeze so you can drink it without any problems )
    I hear that most wineries keep their best stuff local. If you want the best California wines...you gotta go to California...same in Italy, etc.

    I have had some really good Chilean wines.
    "Yeehaw!" is not a foreign policy

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  6. #81
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by PlannerByDay
    Anybody ever been to one of those places where you can make your own wine.
    In Sault Ste. Marie, MI (in the beautiful Upper Peninsula) they just opened a similar venture. At the place in The Soo they have both wine AND beer.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  7. #82

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    Thread Resurrection time!

    I've been trying a lot of Italian reds lately. I still like the juicy, jammy, California reds (Zinfandels, Petite Syrahs), but I've been really enjoying the more acidic, less unctuous Italian reds. Had a really good Barbaresco from 1997 the other night. Very different than say, a California Cabernet.

    Plus, I like the heraldic labels.

    Any thoughts on Malbecs? Sound prettyn interesting, too.

  8. #83
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by RichmondJake
    Because they suck?
    Yes, I grew up in Syracuse so I can tell you for sure, that, though the wine country of NYS is gorgeous, their wine sucks - they make good cooking sherry and a reasonable sweet dessert wine, but Bully Hill, no way - or any of the rest

    my favorites:
    1. Fat Bastard Shiraz (it's a great wine to bring to a friend's house, LOL)
    2. Ravenswood Lodi
    3. a good French Beaujolais (sp) or white bordeaux
    4. Clos Du Bois vinyards, except their chardonnay
    5. Red truck is a pretty good red

    those are my standard wines, my cousin's husband goes to Chile alot for work and he brings us amazing wines you cna't get up here, which I love - we also have Brazilian friends who bring back great wine when they visit relatives

  9. #84
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Bumped

    If ya'll are looking for a decent inexpensive sparkling wine for the holiday season, try the Barefoot Bubbly. I'm sipping on it now. It's made in the charmat (bulk), style, but don't let that turn you off. IMHO, it's not bad. Worthy of attention for the price. I'm gonna grab a couple of more bottles before I make the run to central Florida Wednesday.

    http://www.epicurious.com/drinking/w.../entry?id=5851


    EDIT: Here I am, trying to give out holiday advice, and some people in c. Florida don't believe me.

    EDIT 2: BTW, sparking wine should not be consumed by a glass shaped from the boob of Marie Antoinette. It should be drunk from a fluted glass.
    Last edited by Richmond Jake; 17 Dec 2006 at 7:13 PM.
    Annoyingly insensitive

  10. #85
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by RichmondJake View post
    EDIT 2: BTW, sparking wine should not be consumed by a glass shaped from the boob of Marie Antoinette. It should be drunk from a fluted glass.
    If we have bubbly at Mom's, be prepared for a "boob" glass (geez, where did THAT comparison come from??). Of course, my dad got those for her in Venice Italy. You can live with that, right?

  11. #86
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    If we have bubbly at Mom's, be prepared for a "boob" glass (geez, where did THAT comparison come from??). Of course, my dad got those for her in Venice Italy. You can live with that, right?
    OK, but only because your dad got them. Other than that, NO...BOOB...GLASSES.





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    Annoyingly insensitive

  12. #87
         
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    I have been drinking more wine than usual lately. It snowed here a few weeks ago and my friend came over for the day because her electricity was out. so on our way back to my house we stopped off for a few bottles of wine. We drank about 4 of them . I like both red and white, I typically like a sweeter wine but have been trying lots of different kids lately....
    RJ will laugh or have somethin to say but there is a winery here in MO called St. James, my favorite wines (so far) come from there. We have a ton of wineries here, since I am not a connesouir (sp???) (yet ) I like trying the local stuff...

  13. #88

    Good Wine

    I have found some of our best wine comes from Washington State..........Yakima Valley...........Columbia Crest, Hogue, many other makers. CHile also has some good stuff. You can get a good bottle of wine for under 10 bucks tasting a lot better than some for 30+...........Oregon also has some excellent tasting wine.........I used to make beer but not for 10 yrs now...........was good stuff too!

  14. #89
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Jaxspra View post
    ....RJ will laugh or have somethin to say but there is a winery here in MO called St. James, my favorite wines (so far) come from there. We have a ton of wineries here, since I am not a connesouir (sp???) (yet ) I like trying the local stuff...
    I didn't know they could produce wine from soybeans.

  15. #90
    Cyburbian Salmissra's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Jaxspra View post
    RJ will laugh or have somethin to say but there is a winery here in MO called St. James, my favorite wines (so far) come from there. We have a ton of wineries here, since I am not a connesouir (sp???) (yet ) I like trying the local stuff...
    Actually, my parents like St. James. When they used to drive up to IL for family stuff, they would plan a stop, usually on the way home, at the winery. But since they don't go that way any more, they've had to try other labels.

    The local Texas wines are not quite it for me. But I couldn't tell you why. . .
    "We do not need any other Tutankhamun's tomb with all its treasures. We need context. We need understanding. We need knowledge of historical events to tie them together. We don't know much. Of course we know a lot, but it is context that's missing, not treasures." - Werner Herzog, in Archaeology, March/April 2011

  16. #91
    Cyburbian Planderella's avatar
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    I admit to not knowing that much about wine. I just sample until I find something I like. Last year, I discovered the Hogue brand. I drank an entire bottle of the Riesling on New Years Eve and lived to tell about it.
    "A witty woman is a treasure, a witty beauty is a power!"

  17. #92
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Very cool

    Web site on funny labels wine:

    http://www.winelabels.org/labels.htm
    "The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness."
    John Kenneth Galbraith

  18. #93
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by The One View post
    Web site on funny labels wine:

    http://www.winelabels.org/labels.htm
    Interesting to note how many of those I've drank. Sin Zin is a favorite.

  19. #94
         
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    Quote Originally posted by Salmissra View post
    Actually, my parents like St. James. When they used to drive up to IL for family stuff, they would plan a stop, usually on the way home, at the winery. But since they don't go that way any more, they've had to try other labels.

    The local Texas wines are not quite it for me. But I couldn't tell you why. . .
    Well, if you ever want me to pick a bottle up for the 'rents, let me know, I'll be happy to send it to ya!! They sell it in most of the grocery stores here....

  20. #95
    Cyburbian Greenescapist's avatar
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    One of my favorite wines which seems great for it's price is Marques de Caceres Rioja. It's a medium bodied Spanish wine and seems to go well with anything. I'm no wine expert, but I also like South American reds- Malbec, Shiraz, and most Cabernets.

  21. #96
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Wall Street and Bonuses

    And I'm only bringing some cheap bulk-produced stuff down south....

    NEW YORK - When Michael Aaron learned that Wall Street investment banks were going to be shelling out record bonuses this holiday season, the savvy wine merchant uncorked his own plan to make serious dough.

    He paid for a double-page advertisement in The New York Times, boasting a rare Methuselah-sized bottle of 1995 Dom Perignon. The price tag — $14,950.
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16287715/

  22. #97
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by RichmondJake View post
    And I'm only bringing some cheap bulk-produced stuff down south....



    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16287715/
    Yeah, my bill at the liquor store today was $64; and I'm sure we'll add to that over the weekend.....

  23. #98
    Cyburbian Cal_Planner's avatar
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    I am a snob when it comes to Chardonnay, but one of my favorites is rumored to be gone by January, so order up!

    Rombauer Vineyards
    2005 Carneros Chardonnay
    Retail Price: 29.75

    Rombauer Vineyards' 2005 Carneros Chardonnay is a rich wine with layers of tropical fruit, peaches and pears. The fruit opens up into creamy textures of apples and pears that glide across the palate. Hints of citrus and light oak tones highlight the wine's lingering finish.

    Release Date: August 2006
    Composition:
    - 100% Barrel Fermented and Aged
    - 100% Carneros Appellation
    - 100% Chardonnay
    Brix at Harvest: 25.3
    Alcohol: 14.4%

    3522 Silverado Trail Saint Helena, California 94574 ~ Telephone (800) 622.2206 ~ www.rombauervineyards.com
    Cheers!

  24. #99
    Cyburbian Cal_Planner's avatar
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    I had an interesting experience the other night.

    I was at a very nice resturant in the Bay Area. You would think they would know what the heck they were doing when it comes to wine, given the dinner prices, but that was not the case.

    My friends and I brought in a bottle of the Rombauer Chardonnay referenced above. We paid the corkage fee and the waiter poured the white wine into a Bordeaux glass (a glass typically used for full bodied red wines).

    we didn't fuss....

    After the bottle of Chardonnary was finished, we opened a second bottle of wine (a Pinot Noir) that we had also brought with us (paying a second corkage fee). This time the waiter poured our red wine into a white wine glass with a short bowl.

    I took a sip of the red wine in the white wine glass; ick!

    I then poured the red wine into the Bordeaux glass, and voila! So much better!!!!

    Has anyone else experienced this?


    This "phenomenon" is a known fact, but until you experience it, I don't think you can appreciate it.

    From Wikipedia:

    Wine glasses made of fused or cut glass will often interfere with the flavor of the wine, as well as creating a rough, thick lip, from which it is not as pleasurable to drink. Blown glass results in a better vessel, with a thinner lip, and is usually acceptable for casual wine drinkers. High quality wine glasses are made of crystal, which is porous and helps to aerate the wine. Crystal glasses also produce a better ringing sound when toasting. Wine glasses are generally not coloured or frosted as this would impede the appreciation of its colour.

    Shapes

    The shape of the glass is also very important, as it concentrates the aroma (or bouquet) to emphasise the varietal's characteristic. The shape of the glass also directs the wine itself into the best area of the mouth from the varietal. In general the opening of the glass is not wider than the widest part of the bowl.

    The stem of a glass is an important feature as it provides a way to hold the glass without warming the wine from body heat. It also prevents fingerprints from smearing the glass, and makes the glass easier to swirl. Except for the wine connoisseur, wine glasses can be divided into three types: red wine glasses, white wine glasses and champagne flutes.

    Red wine glasses

    Glasses for red wine are characterized by their rounder, wider bowl, which gives the wine a chance to breathe. Since most reds are meant to be consumed at room temperature, the wider bowl also allows the wine to cool more quickly after hand contact has warmed it. Red wine glasses can have particular styles of their own, such as:

    * Bordeaux glass: Tall with a wide bowl, and is designed for full bodied red wines like Cabernet and Merlot as it directs wine to the back of the mouth.
    * Burgundy glass: Larger than the Bordeaux glass, it has a larger bowl to accumulate aromas of more delicate red wines such as Pinot Noir. This style of glass directs wine to the tip of the tongue.

    White wine glasses

    White wine glasses are generally narrower, although not as narrow as champagne flutes, with somewhat straight or tulip-shaped sides. The narrowness of the white wine glass allows the chilled wine to retain its temperature for two reasons;

    1. The reduced surface area of the glass (in comparison to red wine glasses) means less air circulating around the glass and warming the wine.
    2. The smaller bowl of the glass means less contact between the hand and the glass, and so body heat does not transfer as easily to the wine.
    Cheers!

  25. #100
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Woo Hoo!!!

    My new wine rack was delivered. It holds almost everything I own. And I appreciate that it came pre-assembled.

    (I know, the walls in the utility need painting.)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Wine rack.jpg  

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