Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Cost of historic rehab guidelines? ?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Sep 2004
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    112

    Cost of historic rehab guidelines? ?

    How much more does the sec. of the interior's historic design standards cost than conventional rehab? Are their grants (not loans!) available?

    The situation is that I am in the program design phase of creating a acquistion, rehab, and affordable housing re-sale program in a soon to be listed historic district. It would be advantageous to be able to designate the building historic. . . but I don't know if it's worth the trouble. By boss thinks it will slow down the process, increase the costs, etc. . .however I believe that it will also attract more people to an area with very low home ownership and perceived 'ills'.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,691
    Quote Originally posted by planner99
    How much more does the sec. of the interior's historic design standards cost than conventional rehab? Are their grants (not loans!) available?

    The situation is that I am in the program design phase of creating a acquistion, rehab, and affordable housing re-sale program in a soon to be listed historic district. It would be advantageous to be able to designate the building historic. . . but I don't know if it's worth the trouble. By boss thinks it will slow down the process, increase the costs, etc. . .however I believe that it will also attract more people to an area with very low home ownership and perceived 'ills'.

    Thanks!
    If I'm understanding the issue. . . If the district will be historic then you don't have to apply to get the building considered "historic" - it would be considered a "contributing structure to a historic district."

  3. #3
    There is a 20% federal tax credit available for a "Certified Rehabilitation" of historic structures so long as the rehabilitation costs exceed the "adjusted basis" of the building (basically value of current improvement minus value of land equals adjusted basis). The state and national park service verify eligibility and compliance. Call your state historic preservation officer (shpo) for more info and PM me and I'll get some more info from/for you.

    What is better: quality or quickness?
    On pitching to Stan Musial:
    "Once he timed your fastball, your infielders were in jeopardy."
    Warren Spahn

  4. #4
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Sep 2004
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    112
    Quote Originally posted by Seabishop
    If I'm understanding the issue. . . If the district will be historic then you don't have to apply to get the building considered "historic" - it would be considered a "contributing structure to a historic district."
    Sorry about the confusion Seabishop, either way the distirct is being created. The decision is whether we rehab these homes as per local building code, or we rehab them to the historic guidelines. . .

    Our primary goal is to provide low income households with homeownership opportunities not historic preservation, SO I was trying to get an idea how much more the historic rehab would cost.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by planner?; 22 Sep 2004 at 8:17 PM.

  5. #5
    Member Wulf9's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Near the Geysers
    Posts
    922
    You can design a preservation program that doesn't cost much more or any more than normal construction. The key is that each repair you do must follow the SOI standards, but you only repair the things that need repair. For example, when you reroof, use an appropriate roof. When your window leaks, fix the window (rather than letting the window salesman sell you vinyl all around).

    A good way to do this is to prepare a historic preservation program whenever some rehab needs to be done. The program identifies what to keep, what to replace, what to repair, and how to repair or replace.

    We did this in Monterey CA with a lot of success. We also had an exceptional incentive program that (in my opinion) more than compensated for any real or opportunity costs of being historic.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian SW MI Planner's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,173
    If your using federal/state fund for the rehabilitation, you still have to go through section 106 with your state historic preservation office. You may not have a choice in the matter. They may not let you use siding, replacement windows, etc. Give them a call - they will be a great help. And, always include them from the beginning.

    I think if you *do* have a choice, I think you should still try to preserve the building to your best ability, but take into consideration care and maintenace and the people you are going to be serving. If it is for elderly, maybe siding is best.

  7. #7

    Cost of historic rehab guidelines? ?

    If the area is going to become an historic district then I would go ahead and take advantage of the 20% Federal Tax Credit Incentives and rehab the property right (i.e. follow the sec' of interior standards). If you could couple that w/ some kind of affordable housing financial incentive then the project should be successful financially speaking; plus, by keeping the character of the historic building(s) you will not take away from the overall significance and appearance of the surrounding neighborhood. Of course, it would be possible to buy cheaper products that will get you your end result for a reduced cost, but it would not be worth it visually and socially/culturally. I've seen a lot of bad rehab projects over the years, some of them for low-income housing, and they do leave a bad mark on the community.

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Using tax abatement and/or TIF for housing rehab
    Economic and Community Development
    Replies: 7
    Last post: 01 Nov 2011, 5:37 PM
  2. Rehab and asbestos
    Environmental Planning
    Replies: 1
    Last post: 12 May 2008, 10:17 PM
  3. Cost/benefits of local historic districts
    Economic and Community Development
    Replies: 11
    Last post: 21 Jul 2006, 2:41 AM
  4. Historic district guidelines
    Design, Space, and Place
    Replies: 2
    Last post: 21 Jan 2000, 1:24 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last post: 02 May 1997, 12:40 PM