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Thread: new photos: MONTREAL in september

  1. #1

    new photos: MONTREAL in september

    salut! ça va bien?

    boulevard st-joseph.



    rue st-denis.







    rue de belleville.



    rue pontiac!



    petite maison insolite.





    manifestant anti-sémite à mcgill, accosté par des contre manifestants.



    des graffitis!





    après-midi su' la ste-cat'.





    notre ami est de retour.



    la rue peel.



    retour à la ste-catherine.







    boul. RL.



    ESCAPADE À ST-HENRI!





























































    fini avec st-henri, oké? ben astheure j'pogne l'métro pis je rentre à la maison.

    ...

    en descendant de l'autobus, je remarque la tinte brune des arbres, l'odeur faible de la fumée de bois. l'air frais me chatouille légèrement. l'automne s'approche.





    ...

    centre-ville, vendredi. ciel lourd. crépuscule perpetuel.























    ...

    balade sur le plateau, la fin de semaine dernière.































    merci. bye!

  2. #2
    Cyburbian drucee's avatar
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    Once again, great photos, Christopher. I live in Chicago, but I'm a frequent visitor to Montréal and am quite familiar with all the places you've photographed. When I look at the shots of a crowded Sainte-Catherine or a hopping Saint-Denis in early fall, I can hear "La manifestation" by Les Cowboys Fringants or "Comme une étoile" by Kain on CKOI-FM, or the "Bouge les fesses" of Radio Énergie blasting out of the ubiquitous Golfs, Corollas, and Volvos that the people of this city seem to love. I look at the bars on the Plateau and I can taste Blanche de Chambly beer and perhaps moules-frites as well. I can also hear the softly spoken, though lively French of the young people on the streets, perhaps peppered with an occasional "ostie de crisse de..."

    That's my Montréal, and you captured it perfectly. I'm going to perhaps stir something up and say Montréal is North America's most unique city. But what about New Orleans, you ask? Or San Francisco? The charms of the Vieux Carré and the City by the Bay notwithstanding, the people there still speak the dominant language of the continent, listen to the same Clear Channel radio stations, and watch Survivor with the rest of us. Montréal has a culture all its own, made all the stronger by its steadfast opposition to the 800-pound gorilla of languages. The language difference makes the Montréal culture, although extremely welcoming, almost unknown to its neighbors. In Montréal, Top 40 radio plays not only Britney, Christina, and Avril (even the English-language playlists of Montréal radio stations are closer to their European French counterparts, with certain songs hitting the top of the charts in Montréal and Paris, but never in Toronto or New York), but also the strange mix of folk, rock, and pop known as Québécois pop. Singers like Éric Lapointe are household names in most of Montréal, although one would be hard pressed to find a music shop in Vancouver, Toronto, or even nearby Burlington, Vermont that carries any of his CDs. TV series such as La petite vie are watched by so many people that one would think they were giving away free money, but few others around the world have even heard of it. Montréal has its celebrated local poets, writers, and journalists (I'll take an irate Pierre Foglia over Andy Rooney any day of the week). and a unique architectural style, whose most distinguishing characteristic is the use of a brown brick (see the very first photo) that just hasn't seemed to make it over to the States (although my apartment building is that color). That's not to mention the bright red brick used in most central-city neighborhoods, the brightly colored roofs of Square Saint-Louis, the Soviet-style office buildings downtown (Hôtel Le Germain, on rue Mansfield, is a prime example), the almost Parisian streetscapes of Vieux-Montréal, and the hard contemporary middle-class homes of Boucherville, Blainville, and Brossard.

    I've always felt that there's no city as un-generic as Montréal. Indeed, its bilingualism has a lot to do with that characterization, but Montréal's got the culture to back up the novelty of the language.

  3. #3
    you're right that the bilingualism has a huge amount to do with montreal's unique character. if it were entirely french, it would be a provincial outpost like quebec city. its strength stems from the fact that it is diverse, multicultural city like many others, but one that operates on two lingustic and cultural planes. a lot of its charm also comes from the tension that comes from having two dominant languages. not the overt political tension, of course, which is polarizing and destructive, but an underlying cultural tension. it breeds creativity.

  4. #4
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Chris: a reminder to change your e-mail address in your profile. You've got subscriptions turned on for this thread, and e-mail that would notmally be sent to you is instead bouncing to me. Thanks!

    Must ... visit ... Montreal. The urbanity you've captured on film (or pixels, as the case may be) seems to combine the contemporary built environment of North America with the cosmopolitan nature and street animation of Europe.

    I'm surprised the city has gotten so little attention in the US; instead, it's all about Toronto and Vancouver. Montreal seemed at the forefront in the late 1960s and 1970s -- Expo 1967, the Metro, the Expos, the opening of Mirabal Airport. After the 1976 Olympics, the area became quiet in a way; we didn't hear much about the city, good, bad or otherwise.

    Can the street preacher be arrested because his sign isn't en Francias?
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  5. #5
    well, freedom of speech is a constitutionally guaranteed right. the guy could only be arrested if his sign broke hate laws by inciting violence against a certain group (ie, "kill the jews").

    i'm also surprised that montreal isn't held up as a shining example of how good cities work. it has the highest per-capita transit ridership on the continent (just slightly higher than new york and toronto), one of the lowest car ownership rates and one of the highest densities. it's also very diverse and, as you can see, vibrant.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Very nice photos of Montreal. I have not been there for years and must go and see family before I am disowned. I love the urban feel it has and the bilingualism is unmatched. I think that the languages (as well as the VERY eclectic mix of cultures) make it a very unique and cool city. Great pics, can;t wait to go there now that I'm in a planning mindset.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  7. #7
    Thanks for the photos!

    Duelling posters... that's too funny.

    Quote Originally posted by christopher dewolf
    i'm also surprised that montreal isn't held up as a shining example of how good cities work. it has the highest per-capita transit ridership on the continent (just slightly higher than new york and toronto), one of the lowest car ownership rates and one of the highest densities. it's also very diverse and, as you can see, vibrant.
    That's somewhat surprising to me, as I was actually impressed by how full of cars the place appeared to be in these photos. What variety of transit do they have?

    But what do I know... I've never been there. It is definitely high on my list of places to visit.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Alaithea
    That's somewhat surprising to me, as I was actually impressed by how full of cars the place appeared to be in these photos. What variety of transit do they have?

    But what do I know... I've never been there. It is definitely high on my list of places to visit.
    I think it is sort of an "optical illusion": you see a "lot" of cars becuase so many are parked along the street. Why? I would imagine it is due to a lack of parking. What I see is that cars are a lower priority and are given less room than in most cities -- less pavement to drive on, less pavement to park on -- and it makes the cars they do have crowd into what little space they are allotted.

    At least, that is what it looks like to me (I lived in Europe for a bit -- Europe looks more like that).

  9. #9
    montreal is a big city -- 3.5 million people -- so naturally it's going to have a lot of cars. but it also has a large metro and bus network that carries more than a million riders per day. this city also has one of the largest taxi fleets in north america, with 200 residents per licenced cab (compared to 359 in boston and 418 in chicago).

    all of this combined makes for a city that is very easy to live in without a car.

    in response to alaithea, there is a combination of bus, metro (subway) and commuter rail.

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