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Thread: Bounded Metropolis?

  1. #1
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    Bounded Metropolis?

    I'm looking for examples of cities that have a clearly defined boundary (phyiscal or legal or combination of both) between the urbanized area and the surrounding agricultural and natural environment.

    Portland, Oregon comes to mind. Anybody have other suggestions?

  2. #2
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by jbresner
    I'm looking for examples of cities that have a clearly defined boundary (phyiscal or legal or combination of both) between the urbanized area and the surrounding agricultural and natural environment.

    Portland, Oregon comes to mind. Anybody have other suggestions?
    IMHO, despite a growth rate that is light-years beyond '3rd World' level, the Las Vegas, NV metro area has the 'cleanest' urban/rural interfaces of all in the USA. Simply put, if you don't have a municipal water main, you don't develop there.

    Also, due to its mountanous surroundings, I would think that Anchorage, AK has a pretty well defined urban/rural interface.

    Mike

  3. #3
    Cyburbian drucee's avatar
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    A lot of French cities have developed this way. Saint-Malo is a really strong example: as you travel along the main road between Saint-Malo and Cancale, the landscape is completely agricultural right up to the red "Saint-Malo" sign that marks the city limits. Immediately over that sign, right behind Jacques Cartier's ancestral cottage, Limoilou, begins suburban development--condos and 1980s-vintage detached homes. A few other cities share this pattern: Quimper and Fougères, for example. Perhaps Tucson is the US city that could best match up.

    Chicago and New York, on the other hand, have a really fuzzy rural/urban boundary. Commuter subdivisions in places such as Warrenville and Lake in the Hills (not to mention the old canal towns of Channahon and Minooka) brush up against farms and prairies. Although they are a somewhat artificial creation, the forest preserves all over the Chicago suburbs give the impression of spotty development even in relatively close-in places like Arlington Heights, Winnetka, and Orland Park. In the New York area, the urban/suburban frontier is approaching Orange County, the gateway to the Borscht Belt approximately 45 to 70 miles northwest of Manhattan. High-density housing developments are taking over communities like Monroe, formerly a farm town, but being settled by increasing numbers of people with jobs in New York and Hassidic Jews moving in from Brooklyn. The result is something like Saint-Leonard or Blainville in the middle of a forested region full of summer bungalow colonies (often now used as permanent homes) and day camps.

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    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Nobody has mentioned Boulder? The Blue Line and Area III, along with Parks and Open Space, has created a pretty stark contrast between city and country.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

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    Cyburbian the north omaha star's avatar
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    Montgomery County, MD (DC suburb) has an Ag Preserve. It's located in the extreme north and west sections of the County.
    I am recognizing that the voice inside my head
    is urging me to be myself but never follow someone else
    Because opinions are like voices we all have a different kind". --Q-Tip

  6. #6
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Cardinal
    Nobody has mentioned Boulder? The Blue Line and Area III, along with Parks and Open Space, has created a pretty stark contrast between city and country.
    The problem that I note with Boulder is that the city's enforced/owned green (brown?) belt is mostly an artificial thing, as right beyond it is the faceless sprawl of outer suburban Denver as well as the places where those Bounderites who cannot afford to live in the city, nor study there and live in student housing, have to call home. The city does not have the units inside of the belt to house everyone in the area who wants to live there.

    I look upon the Boulder green belt area as parkland and not truly 'rural' land (the mountainous area west of the city is an obvious exception).

    Mike

  7. #7
    Cyburbian H's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by jbresner
    I'm looking for examples of cities that have a clearly defined boundary (phyiscal or legal or combination of both) between the urbanized area and the surrounding agricultural and natural environment.
    Miami FL and the Redlands ag district to the west (inbetween the city and the glades).

    There is a boundry line drawn on the map.

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