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Thread: Cyburbia's thoughts on "bad" weather.

  1. #26

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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess
    There is absolutely nothing wrong with 80 degree Christmases.

    We don't get much winter precipitation here, so we hardly have any cold, gray days, and that's fine by me.
    Ah, but its the double 90 Julys that got me (90 degrees+90% humidity)

  2. #27
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis
    It is called MICHIGAN.

    I live here because I like the snow. In parts of the Keweenaw Peninsula in the Upper Peninsula will get as much as 400 inches of snow each year. It is also the same on the east side of lake Erie in NY.

    I like weather that changes. Warm (BUT NOT HOT) summers, crisp cold fall mornings that warm up to 40s or 50s during the day with sun shine, Cold Sharp winters with more snow than we know what to do with. Spring... I like the flowers, but everything else sucks.
    Everything Ski says, except not sure about "everything else sucks".

    Bear Looking For Mittens, Not Kittens
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  3. #28
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
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    Midwest winter's sure are.. gray. And I agree with BKM, Gedunker, where are you seeing all those other colors? In the winter, white capped mounds of plowed black dirt, ditches filled dirt dusted drifts, and gray skies are the norm.

    I love the El Guapo wrath of god storms. I love chasing them. I love them chasing me. I couldn't leave the midwest and it's wild weather.
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

  4. #29

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    Well, before I sound too much like a California booster, I have to admit that there is one really big negative California climate feature: wildfires. You should have seen the "air" yesterday-big wildfire north of here. And, with the late fall off-shore winds (our version of the dreaded Santa Ana), all the smoke is being pushed down to Solano County and the Bay Area.

    Plus, I love San Francisco-but not when it's 90 degrees. SF STINKS when its hot. All that density+all those corner vegetable and meat markets (Chinatown is LOVELY on a hot day)

  5. #30
    Cyburbian ludes98's avatar
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    I like living in an oven. I can't recall hearing anyone say that they like 115F weather, but I certainly find that easier to handle than -10F. Winters here are more like colder climate falls. 50F-60F highs 30F-40F lows. Not unlike my recent trip to the NE US. I would rather live in Flagstaff where it is cooler and pretty but wildfires and employment compensation levels keep that from happening.

  6. #31
    Cyburbian nerudite's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by The One
    Often I find myself wondering what it would be like in Inuvik during winter....or Churchill in February!
    Hey, Inuvik has a planner job opening. Check it out!

  7. #32
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ludes98
    I like living in an oven. I can't recall hearing anyone say that they like 115F weather, but I certainly find that easier to handle than -10F. Winters here are more like colder climate falls. 50F-60F highs 30F-40F lows. Not unlike my recent trip to the NE US. I would rather live in Flagstaff where it is cooler and pretty but wildfires and employment compensation levels keep that from happening.
    We had a planner that moved the Scottsdale because he loved the HOT weather. Personally I think you both are crazy. Think about this, in -15f, you can stay warm and adjust your body temp by layering clothes. In 115F, you could be completely naked and still be hot.

    Plus the cold helps preserve you longer....
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  8. #33
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ludes98
    I like living in an oven. I can't recall hearing anyone say that they like 115F weather, but I certainly find that easier to handle than -10F. Winters here are more like colder climate falls. 50F-60F highs 30F-40F lows. Not unlike my recent trip to the NE US. I would rather live in Flagstaff where it is cooler and pretty but wildfires and employment compensation levels keep that from happening.
    I can't say that I LIKE it as hot as 115F but I have lived in the Mojave and there is a lot to that "it's not the heat, it's the humidity" thing. I can take the desert southwest better than Georgia these days.

    I really hate cold weather. But I also really hate getting sunburns from going out to my car. I liked Richland, Washington and went to the pool there a LOT when we lived at a nice apartment complex with a hot tub next to the pool. It was far enough north to not hate my skin and the hot tub allowed us to warm up in between.

    Nothing worse than being cold-hating person with a Northern European complexion: There are few places in the world where I am not miserable about some aspect of the climate.

  9. #34
    Cyburbian nerudite's avatar
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    I have found that I like snow... but that I hate cold. And when I mean cold... I mean COLD! I can easily take temperatures down to let's say -15C (+5F)... and that's with the windchill. Add wind or drop the temperature from there, and I hate it. Actually wind at any temperature pretty much sucks.

    That being said, this is the first time in my life that I've had four whole seasons and I kind of like it. I like to see the passing of time in nature instead of just on a calendar. Growing up in L.A., it was summer all the time (with the exception of two months of fall) and then living in the Pac NW, it felt like fall all the time (with the exception of two months of summer). I just wish that our winter here wasn't six to eight months long... that's a bit much. Luckily there is only about two months of it that I absolutely can't stand.

    Quote Originally posted by Michele Zone
    I really hate cold weather. But I also really hate getting sunburns from going out to my car. I liked Richland, Washington and went to the pool there a LOT when we lived at a nice apartment complex with a hot tub next to the pool. It was far enough north to not hate my skin and the hot tub allowed us to warm up in between.
    Be careful of how far north you go though. I thought when I moved up here that the sun would be no big deal, since I grew up in L.A. and everything. But I burn way worse here because of the thinner ozone layer. Our UV index is much higher than I would have ever thought prior to moving here. Crazy, eh?

  10. #35
    Cyburbian pandersen's avatar
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    I've been to Inuvik in June - a beautiful drive up there from Manitoba. A wonderful place to visit, but a hell of a place to live. The early part of June is a great time to visit - the bugs aren't out yet and neither are the RV crowd.

    Coming from S. Ontario, I'm used to cold humid winters with varying amounts of wet snow. By contrast, I prefer the cold continental climate of Manitoba (up above N. Dakota). We get a fair bit of snow out here, but it usually is dry and blowing rather than wet and messy. I do have to admit, however, that some on certain days, that minus 40 temperatures become a bit trying.

    Ah well, I'm looking forward to being able to crank up the thermostat on my new high efficiency gas furnace this winter. No more freezing to death for this planner.

  11. #36
    Cyburbian ludes98's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN
    Think about this, in -15f, you can stay warm and adjust your body temp by layering clothes. In 115F, you could be completely naked and still be hot.
    True, but because of the heat, I am rarely required to wear a tie and a suit is for interviews or a funeral!

  12. #37
    Quote Originally posted by boiker
    Midwest winter's sure are.. gray. And I agree with BKM, Gedunker, where are you seeing all those other colors? In the winter, white capped mounds of plowed black dirt, ditches filled dirt dusted drifts, and gray skies are the norm.
    I turned off I-70 west at Richmond Indiana and took state road 35 northwest to Muncie. I'd gone down to Miami of Ohio at Oxford (sweet campus!) and was headed back to BSU. It was late afternoon in mid-February 1989 and the sky was laden with snow clouds -- thick, puffy, bellowing clouds of all different colors of gray. Just before sunset the clouds parted and these brilliant shafts of gold illuminated the fields, then the pinks, purples, oranges and golds as they closed again. The fields were the black and brown of rich chernozem soils, and there were pale gold cornstalks from fields that were allowed to go fallow. There's not much to see in Economy, Indiana but farmland and the occasional browns-and-blacks of rusting farm tractors parked near a fading red barn.

    Maybe I just saw it differently because I was born and raised in the city and the farm was not my stomping grounds.
    On pitching to Stan Musial:
    "Once he timed your fastball, your infielders were in jeopardy."
    Warren Spahn

  13. #38
    Cyburbian plankton's avatar
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    Mmmmm......bad weather.

    Love it. The more the better. We get pounded with winter storms here on the Oregon coast and it is great, especially experiencing it from within an old growth forest propped up on a headland with a view of the surf below.

    I definitely miss the snow, though, and the four seasons (grew up in Detroit).

    I think my favorite climate resides somewhere in the intermountain west.

    An erupting volcano counts as bad weather, doesn't it?

  14. #39
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by donk
    While not quite Inuvik Kugluktuk, Nunavut is hiring right now. $65 000 plus $16 000 in Northern living credit (non taxable income). If I did not need light I'd consider it, if you are going to live in the boonies, it might as well be the real boonies.
    Off-topic:
    I've thought about applying for that one. With Swedish roots and a fondness for freezing cold weather and fleece, it might be a great opportunity. Then again, I don't speak Inuit (yet--it's one of the preferred skills listed).

    So, obviously, give me cold weather and rainy weather and snowy weather any day. Hot weather, humid or not, just doesn't do it for me.
    I don't dream. I plan.

  15. #40
    Cyburbian PlannerByDay's avatar
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    Like many others here I too am a 4 seasons kinda guy. I do get a little sick of the gray cloudy days in the middle of winter. Being that my office is in the basement I can easily go 5 days in a row (monday - Friday) only seeing 5 hour or less of sunlight. (dark when I get to work. 1 hours of sunlight at lunch and dark when I get outta worK.

    Right now the lack of light does not really bother me but I know it will when I get older

  16. #41
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Plannerbabs
    Off-topic:
    I've thought about applying for that one. With Swedish roots and a fondness for freezing cold weather and fleece, it might be a great opportunity. Then again, I don't speak Inuit (yet--it's one of the preferred skills listed).

    So, obviously, give me cold weather and rainy weather and snowy weather any day. Hot weather, humid or not, just doesn't do it for me.

    If decide to apply, let me know, the guy that left is a friend of a friend and can probably get you some tips. He said it was a great expereince, that has lead to much greeener pastures(still in the far north)

    As for speaking inuit, not a lot of people do and I doubt they have words for Zoning and land subdivision.
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  17. #42
    Cyburbian Rumpy Tunanator's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis
    I live here because I like the snow. In parts of the Keweenaw Peninsula in the Upper Peninsula will get as much as 400 inches of snow each year. It is also the same on the east side of lake Erie in NY.
    What crack are you smoking ? Last time I checked, we did not get 400" of snow per season over here. Avg. is 80", more in ski country.
    A guy once told me, "Do not have any attachments, do not have anything in your life you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you spot the heat around the corner."


    Neil McCauley (Robert DeNiro): Heat 1995

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