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Thread: ASB College Neighborhoods... College Design!

  1. #1
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    ASB College Neighborhoods... College Design!

    I just about everyone here has been on a college campus, and typically they are designed a bit different than the rest of the community and neighborhood.

    What are some of the better campus designs that you have seen, and have you ever worked on a design plan for a college?

    (post pictures and/or links)

  2. #2
    Cyburbian H's avatar
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    UCF (where my little bro goes) is designed with circles and strategically placed parking garages, so it is a short walk to everything on a big campus.

    Here is the master plan:

    http://www.fp.ucf.edu/mp2000dev/Maps...GN_revised.jpg

  3. #3
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    The newer side of the University of Northern Colorado, I have dubbed the Univ. of Moscow, for its simpictic communistic architecture. THE ONE may agree with me on this one, as he knows. The new side was constructed in the 70s? I think as well as the student center whose architecture and interior elements look like something out of 1972.

    The old side was cool, lots of older buildings, large trees, and small parks to hang out in. My favorite side to spend a hour throwing the baseball or football while waiting for the next class.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

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    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Ding Ding Ding....

    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN
    The newer side of the University of Northern Colorado, I have dubbed the Univ. of Moscow, for its simpictic communistic architecture. THE ONE may agree with me on this one, as he knows. The new side was constructed in the 70s? I think as well as the student center whose architecture and interior elements look like something out of 1972.

    The old side was cool, lots of older buildings, large trees, and small parks to hang out in. My favorite side to spend a hour throwing the baseball or football while waiting for the next class.
    Exactly why I refused to attend the University unless I could be placed in Snyder Hall...corner room at the cross roads of it all.....(god what a great two years there....) It does matter that the place you stay in has character and feels right....that institutionalized CRAP on the new campus (70's & 80's) with concrete walls and drab architecture creates an oppressive environment. The only two buildings worth a damn over there are the library and Candelaria Hall....the UC is ok....At least UNC had the common decency to build the new dorm in a "similar" architecture to Snyder Hall, since it is directly across the street....

    All you have to do is take one look at the campus map to know where to live:
    http://www.unco.edu/uncmap/
    It could be much worse....you could have to live on campus at Western State College (Good place to go to school for skiing at Crested Butte )

    Brown University back in the early 90's was not much to look at either.....visiting my cousin at the student/Frat slums....(nice 3 story homes in trashed neighborhoods)

    One of my favorite campus locations anywhere in the world is:
    College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor Maine
    http://www.coa.edu/
    "The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness."
    John Kenneth Galbraith

  5. #5
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by The One
    Exactly why I refused to attend the University unless I could be placed in Snyder Hall...corner room at the cross roads of it all.....(god what a great two years there....) It does matter that the place you stay in has character and feels right....that institutionalized CRAP on the new campus (70's & 80's) with concrete walls and drab architecture creates an oppressive environment. The only two buildings worth a damn over there are the library and Candelaria Hall....the UC is ok....At least UNC had the common decency to build the new dorm in a "similar" architecture to Snyder Hall, since it is directly across the street....
    I lived on the "Moscow" side in Harrision for a year. Lots of parties, but a downer environment in which to live. I chose off campus for the next two years in the trashed neighborhoods had a better time there than anything. Until the car break ins and gun shots....
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Greenescapist's avatar
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    I'm really interested in planning for university campuses and how they affect the surronding city/region. Right now I work part-time for the campus planning department for the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I'd like to continue doing something like this when I'm done school in May.

    About campuses... I've done a lot of research into schools that have good transportation demand management programs--- which I think is one of the keys to having a nice campus environment and not mucking up the surronding city with tons of cars, lots and garages.

    The most respected for TDM seem to be UW-Madison, UC-Boulder, Cornell, University of Washington and Stanford.

    Campuses that I have seen and really like are Princeton, Boston College, University of Washington, Harvard. For a being in a big city, NYU was pretty cool. I like UW-Madison for its nice natural setting and the city of Madison itself, but a lot of the buildings are ugly and jumbled together. UC-Berkeley had a nice natural setting, too, but the same building jumble.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Rumpy Tunanator's avatar
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    Worst designed college expansion (and a land selling scheme, as well as an attempt by the voting Alumni to shelter their kids from the city) is the University of Buffalo's North Campus out in Swampherst or Crapherst, you decide. Looks like something out of the Cold War Era. Don't want those students to protest you know. I could get into the reasons of why and how this happened, but that is another story that maybe someone else would like to dabble in. Come on U.B. Students or Graduates, I'm waiting
    A guy once told me, "Do not have any attachments, do not have anything in your life you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you spot the heat around the corner."


    Neil McCauley (Robert DeNiro): Heat 1995

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    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    I'll second that....

    Quote Originally posted by Greenescapist
    I'm really interested in planning for university campuses and how they affect the surronding city/region. Right now I work part-time for the campus planning department for the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I'd like to continue doing something like this when I'm done school in May.

    About campuses... I've done a lot of research into schools that have good transportation demand management programs--- which I think is one of the keys to having a nice campus environment and not mucking up the surronding city with tons of cars, lots and garages.

    The most respected for TDM seem to be UW-Madison, UC-Boulder, Cornell, University of Washington and Stanford.

    Campuses that I have seen and really like are Princeton, Boston College, University of Washington, Harvard. For a being in a big city, NYU was pretty cool. I like UW-Madison for its nice natural setting and the city of Madison itself, but a lot of the buildings are ugly and jumbled together. UC-Berkeley had a nice natural setting, too, but the same building jumble.
    I would agree abou the Stanford and Princeton Campus descriptions.....they are both sweet.....Funny kind of payback by the "nerds", in that they get the best of everything later in life, but man do they pay for it in high school.....ha ha ha....

    The UC Boulder campus is nice and continues to improve, with the exception of those god awful towers erected in the late 70's early 80's..... My dad was at Kittredge Hall in the 60's and waxes nostalgic everytime he drives by the place....

    Swarthmore college is supposedly FANTASTIC.....didn't get a chance to visit my cousin there....plus, how good can they be...they don't even have a geography or planning department.....ha ha ha.... Same with Williams College....where my other cousin went.....ha ha ha...Anyone been to these elitist schools?
    "The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness."
    John Kenneth Galbraith

  9. #9
    Cyburbian
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    One town, many universes

    I went to Harvard for undergrad. Coming from Baltimore, I was amazed at both the beauty and the vibrancy of Harvard Square when I first visited as a junior in high school.
    Over the course of the four years, the dynamism of the square was quite interesting to observe. High end retail, pubs, and chain resteraunts are being pushed out by excessively high commercial rents. Structure departed my freshman year and the space it once occupied remained vacant until this fall; a consignment shop now fills the space. Abercrombie & Fitch left this past summer; a new branch of Citizens Bank, which currently has a branch two blocks away on the same street, will take over that space. Among the other casualties of commercial rent increases gone wild are Chilis, Rock Bottom Bar, and the world famous House of Blues. What's even more troubling is how there are multiple stores from the same chain in Harvard Square. For instance, in the square there are 2 CVS stores, 3 Au Bon Pain stores, at least 2 Crate and Barrel stores, and I don't even know how many Starbucks coffee shops. And the proliferation of Harvard Square bank branches startles me. But even with all the name changes, all the new storefronts, the vibrant nature of the square remains intact and the beauty of its neo-Georgian aesthetic continues to haunt me.
    I am currently pursuing my masters in planning at MIT, and though MIT is technically only two subway stops away, visually, its a whole other universe. Most of MIT's buildings are drab concrete inside and out. The west campus while more diversified in building material, is decidedly ugly with all buildings pushed to the sides of centrally oriented but underused athletic fields, overused tennis courts, and a parking lot. Overall, MIT's moribund campus architecture and planning mirrors the depressed character of human interaction on the campus. I move to an off-campus apartment in Harvard Square in December.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Achernar's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by schristmas
    What's even more troubling is how there are multiple stores from the same chain in Harvard Square. For instance, in the square there are 2 CVS stores, 3 Au Bon Pain stores, at least 2 Crate and Barrel stores, and I don't even know how many Starbucks coffee shops.
    Psh, only four (if you count the one on Broadway and the one up Mass Ave). And you forgot the three Dunkin Donuts.
    And the proliferation of Harvard Square bank branches startles me. But even with all the name changes, all the new storefronts, the vibrant nature of the square remains intact and the beauty of its neo-Georgian aesthetic continues to haunt me.
    I am currently pursuing my masters in planning at MIT, and though MIT is technically only two subway stops away, visually, its a whole other universe. Most of MIT's buildings are drab concrete inside and out. The west campus while more diversified in building material, is decidedly ugly with all buildings pushed to the sides of centrally oriented but underused athletic fields, overused tennis courts, and a parking lot. Overall, MIT's moribund campus architecture and planning mirrors the depressed character of human interaction on the campus. I move to an off-campus apartment in Harvard Square in December.
    Well it's not really fair to compare the MIT campus with the Harvard-area business district. Central Square is much more downtown to Harvard Square's uptown, but it's hardly a bad place (despite two 7-11s). Certainly fewer tourist-oriented businesses.

    Kendall Square is horrible, though. It's dead by 7PM, isn't it?

  11. #11
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by Achernar
    Well it's not really fair to compare the MIT campus with the Harvard-area business district. Central Square is much more downtown to Harvard Square's uptown, but it's hardly a bad place (despite two 7-11s). Certainly fewer tourist-oriented businesses.

    Kendall Square is horrible, though. It's dead by 7PM, isn't it?
    But that's my issue: While Harvard's campus and business district for the most part coalesce in an interesting, inviting way creating a vibrant atmosphere, MIT cuts itself off from Cambridge, creating a depressing vacuum. MIT's layout makes pedestrian travel a laborious chore, especially since hideous architectural mishaps scar the campus. I reside in Tang Hall, next to Westgate; its a 15-20 minute walk to Mass Ave, where all of my classes are as well as everything else I need. And yes Kendall Square is horrible. MIT is a failure in placemaking and consistently ranks in student polls as one of the worst college campuses in America

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