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Thread: Shopping Centers In Your Town

  1. #26
    Cyburbian abrowne's avatar
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    Owned by Morguard Investments, Coquitlam Centre (http://www.coquitlamcentre.com/) has undergone massive renovation within the past few years. Parking lots have been swallowed for new construction, and the mall has reworked its image so that it is now one of the premier malls in the entire greater Vancouver area. Large plush (and extrememely comfortable) chairs and couches lay about beside interior trees, with skylights regularily spaced. The new wing of the mall is designed to be open, light, and airy (hello '90/'00 architecture) while the older areas of the mall are lumber and stained glass and come off as rather fortified and secure.

    The mall's parking lots continue to topple in favour of new construction, with ground zero of Coquitlam's northeastern downtown beginning to take form beside the mall. With a light-rail link connecting to skytrain to be completed by 2010-2012, the area is really getting exciting.

    This area is quite urban, and is only expanding in density (think 35 storey towers in a municipality, Coquitlam, of about 120,000 people).

    Right. So I like that mall. It's not bad. I hate malls in general, mostly because the air is stale, but if I have to visit Coquitlam Centre it is not the end of the world.

    *incoherent Andrew after far too many hours in the studio*

  2. #27

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    LifeStyle Centers

    I enjoy visiting all the new LifeStyle Centers opening up around the country. Easton Town Center in Columbus and The Waterfront in Pittsburgh are the two I visit the most. I read in Southlake, Texas (near Dallas) a new lifestyle shopping center was built INCLUDING a new city hall and post office!

    The plus is that these mall developers are spending money on streetscape design and these developments usually include a public fountain or water feature and lots of foliage.

    The downside is that these developments do not offer a mix of residential areas (usually only upscale apartments or high end condo units) and are located far away from the town center so most people must drive to go there.

  3. #28
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by RaneyOnline View post
    I... I read in Southlake, Texas (near Dallas) a new lifestyle shopping center was built INCLUDING a new city hall and post office!

    The plus is that these mall developers are spending money on streetscape design and these developments usually include a public fountain or water feature and lots of foliage.

    The downside is that these developments do not offer a mix of residential areas (usually only upscale apartments or high end condo units) and are located far away from the town center so most people must drive to go there.
    Quite a few communities are attempting to undertake, or partner with the private sector to undertake "town center" projects which bring together civic and retail functions. This is mostly true in rapidly growing communities which may have never developed a true downtown. I have a proposal out right now to provide the master planning for one of these. It would be our first "town center," although we have done several lifestyle malls.

    Most lifestyle malls do not have residential in the mix, or for that matter, they even miss office and other non-retail employment. In my mind, these begin to get into a questionable area as to whether they really are true lifestyle malls.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  4. #29
    Cyburbian the north omaha star's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    Our mall, The Crossroads, is made to look like a Spanish Plaza inside the foot court, and a little like a downtown streetscape in the rest of it. Which is good because we donít have a real downtown.
    I've been to that mall a couple of times, while visiting the in-laws.
    I am recognizing that the voice inside my head
    is urging me to be myself but never follow someone else
    Because opinions are like voices we all have a different kind". --Q-Tip

  5. #30
    Cyburbian Hceux's avatar
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    In this town of about 50,000 people, there are two malls.

    As long as I can remember, there has always been this mall on an old highway that is no longer the main highway for the area. This mall has been a sad one. Until quite recently, it's been mostly empty except for a bank and a grocery store. And, now, parts of the mall is being converted into many offices related to disability support, such as a Canadian Hearing Society, a Brain Injury group, a hearing aid dispenser office, etc. The fact that this mall doesn't have a website is telling, I believe.

    The other mall (http://quintemall.shopping.ca/) has been changing quite a bit for the last twenty years. It was a small mall that had a movie theatre, a grocery store, and the usual combination of stores such as a bookstore, a department store, a few music stores, and etc. Now, the mall and its area has been colonized by the big box stores. The mall has become anchored by a few big box stores, like Winners (a clothing store), Sportschek (a sports store), Chapters (a bookstore), Toys R Us (a toys store), Sears home (another home furniture store). The surrounding area include the usual toppings, such as Home Depot, the Brick (a discount furniture store), a new movie theatre, Staples, a discount grocery store, Zellers, Future Shop (an electronics store), and many more. The whole street is just swarmed with droppings of big box stores.

    The location of this area is located next to the 401, which is the main highway for the area. Additionally, two major highways that connect the town with the countryside are close to this mall area. I believe that this mall now serve a large area including the town.

  6. #31
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
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    In my neck of the woods, there seems to be lifestyle centers popping up like crazy. The largest in Illinois is Algonquin Commons (http://www.shopatalgonquincommons.com), only about 10 minutes from me, which was built about three years ago and has about 85 stores and restaurants. It generates over a million dollars in sales tax a year. Across the street (or 6-lane thoroughfare, if you will), the Algonquin Galleria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algonquin_Galleria) is being developed. It is supposed to have over 100 stores and restaurants eventually, but so far, there's only a few furniture stores, a Best Buy, and a Brunswick Zone under construction. Build-out could take 5-7 years.

    There's also the Esplanade of Algonquin (http://www.esplanadeofalgonquin.com), which will fit the traditional "lifestyle center" definition better. It's supposed to have several three-story buildings, with a mix of apartments, offices, and ground-level retail. In the front of the center will be restaurants, located on outlots.

    Concern was made that these outdoor malls along Randall Road would put Spring Hill Mall, an enclosed mall in West Dundee with over 100 stores, a food court, and five anchors out of business, but that has not happened. This mall was built in 1980, and has five department stores, which are all quite healthy. A revitilization project added fountains and gardents in the middle of the mall, along with a Barnes & Noble and Steve & Barry's. A new Home Depot was also built on the mall's outskirts. The surrounding retail stores are a little shaky, though. This mall's survival is likely due to continued residential growth in the area and the fact that it is the only enclosed mall in the area.

    An outlet mall in Huntley along I-90 features about 40 stores. It went down the tubes fairly quickly, after being built in 1994. But due to the rapid growth in the area, it is back on the upswing. A revitalization project a couple years ago also helped.

    Woodfield Mall, one of the top 10 largest malls in North America, is located 45 minutes from me, and is healthy as ever. The whole area around that mall continues to see immense commercial growth.
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
    -Steven Tyler

  7. #32

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    Mt.Vernon, Illinois

    I grew up in Mt.Vernon, Illinois. It has a dying downtown and a large stip mall downtown that has been vacant for years. I'm not sure what it would take to turn this community around because it seems to have all the right assets but very slow growth.

    The community is too small to attract a large developer but I know that a "NEW DOWNTOWN" could be created from the strip mall. Enstead of a LIFESTYLE CENTER filled with upscale stores...a retail/entertainment/living unit could be built with fountains and landscaping while tucking the parking behind.

    The potential is there but how to attract a developer?

  8. #33
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Say Goodnight, Southwyck

    It appears that Toledo's Southwyck Mall will finally kick the bucket. There are only a few stores that remain open. Years ago it was a destination mall, big crowds, jammed during the holiday season, three big anchor stores. The death bell is finally sounding because health inspectors have found severe mold in the area where the big Montgomery Ward anchor is now boarded-up.

    A successful developer has been in negotiations with the owners of the property. He wants to tear the 1970s structure down and replace it with a boulevard and small retail strips. It is a decent location, very close to the Ohio Turnpike (I-80/I-90) and a demographic that is relatively middle income. If you do a Google Map of Toledo, it is on Reynolds Road, just north of Heatherdowns Boulevard, on the western edge of the city.

    Bear
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  9. #34
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Southwyck Now Dead

    Yesterday was the final day for what was once a premier and popular shopping destination in Toledo, OH.....Southwyck (Shopping) Mall. Only two stores were open in the last few days. Quite a few folks went to the mall on the final day, just to walk the mall, take a few pictures. Of course, the local news media was also at Southwyck.

    As mentioned many posts ago, back in the 1970s (when "the mall" was king), Toledo had the following.....

    Southwyck Mall
    Franklin Park Mall
    North Towne Mall
    Woodville Mall
    Greenwood Mall

    Southwyck = dead. North Towne = dead for years. Greenwood = dead for years.

    Woodville Mall (the only mall on the east side of the Maumee River) is struggling. Franklin Park, now known as Westfield Franklin Park, continues to expand. It is the only truly regional shopping mall in Metro Toledo.

    Metro Toledo now has a pair of "lifestyle centers", one that just cut their ribbon late last year and one that has been open for a couple years.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  10. #35
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    The dinky little mall here is hemorraging with the opening of a "destination" place on the beach side. The mall has the one-story version of the dept stores (translate= the petite dept is about 12 x 20 in any given store....). Stores are closing weekly. Can't blame them.

    In my hometown of Orlando:

    the first mall, Colonial Plaza, with its 5 story Jordan Marsh dept store, went down years ago and is now big box heaven.

    Number 2, Winter Park Mall, same fate tho' redeveloped as a "destination" (I'm getting to hate that term), restaurants, specialty retail, movies, etc.

    Altamonte Mall, number 3, still thriving.

    Most of the rest, built in the last 15 years, still going strong, even with the arrival of the Mall at Millenia with high-end retailers. Maybe because Millenia is south of town by the tourist corridors, and most locals won't drive the distance.

    I remember '75 when I went to New England to college and my fellow dorm-mates were astonished: "You have malls in Florida? Really? You don't go to NYC every year to buy clothes?" Made you want to slap people silly.

  11. #36
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    Moderator note:
    Thread closed.
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  12. #37
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    Moderator note:
    Threead reopened.


    Bear, this is a late response, I know, but was one of the last stores that remained open a sneaker store?
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  13. #38
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    Moderator note:
    Thread reopened.


    Bear, this is a late response, I know, but was one of the last stores that remained open a sneaker store?
    Sorry, Dan, not sure exactly what stores lasted until the end. I was in Southwyck Mall about a year before it expired, shopping at a Kay Jewelers. The only reason I went there is because I knew the Kay was just a few feet from one of the entrances. EZ in / EZ out. Heh heh heh.....
    _____

    Metro Toledo's two "lifestyle centers" continue to survive. Not sure, but The Shops At Fallen Timbers could be in dire straits. Last year I went to a bookstore at this center and it was really quiet.....and it was a Saturday! The more upscale Levis Commons appears to be busy when I go by (not often). The developer was struggling to fill the other portions of his planned development.

    Bear
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  14. #39
    Cyburbian Otis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    Moderator note:
    Thread closed.
    Ah, a preventive thread closure. I'm impressed.

  15. #40
    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    Moderator note:
    Thread reopened.


    Bear, this is a late response, I know, but was one of the last stores that remained open a sneaker store?
    Southwyck Mall closed around June 30, 2008. The last remaining stores at the beginning of 2008 were:

    Lady Foot Locker
    Kids Foot Locker
    USA Nails
    World Nails
    Style Trends
    Champs
    Deb
    GNC
    Kay Jewelers
    Bath & Body Works
    Victoria’s Secret
    Abba Airbrush

    I was there the last day it was open. Lady Foot Locker, Victoria's Secret and most of the others had closed by that point. Only Deb and GNC and perhaps one or two other stores were open on that last day.

    One of the songs playing in the mall that day was the Beatles "The Long and Winding Road"

  16. #41
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
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    Speaking of dead malls, there's one near me that appears to be clinging to life.

    I just stopped by Charlestowne Mall recently in St. Charles, IL (a far west suburb of Chicago) and that mall is not doing too hot. Right now, they have about a 70% vacancy rate, with only about 30-40 stores operating, down from a peak of about 100. The sad thing is that the mall is not that old...it was built in 1991, meaning it's only 20 years old, but was really only relevant for about 10 or 15 years.

    Currently, the anchor tenants, Kohl's, Carson Pirie Scott, and Von Maur seemed to be alright, but Sears just closed down after negotiations broke down with the mall's new owner. I was actually there on the 2nd to last day they were in business (just a few weeks ago)...it was weird seeing a store like that pretty much empty. Additionally, the mall has a movie theater, mini golf place, and junior anchor Famous Footwear. Not sure how well the movie theater does. However, there are only about 20-30 smaller stores remaining in the interior of the mall. Pretty much all that remains are standards like American Eagle, Victorias Secret, Bath & Body Works, Claires, Radio Shack, Kay Jewelers, Payless, Regis Hairstyles, Lenscrafters, GNC, Gymboree, Limited, Christopher Banks, Deb Shop, a nail salon, a newstand store, a few accessory stores, a handful of food places, and a couple cell phone stores. But this is a far cry from the regional mall it used to be, with 100 stores.

    The mall is still nice on the inside, looks brand new, and very clean. But the vacancies and gated-up tenant spaces and lack of people there make for a very strange combination.

    I think the mall's death knell was the 2002 opening of Geneva Commons, an 80-store lifestyle center that has many more upscale retailers that are more popular and appropriate for the area, considering its mostly wealthy demographics. In addition, there are other regional malls that are only 20 minutes away, such as Spring Hill Mall (Carpentersville/Dundee), Fox Valley Mall (Aurora/Naperville), and Stratford Square (Bloomingdale) that seem to be better at pulling customers in thanks to their larger trade areas and more diverse demographics.
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
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  17. #42
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    Welcome to Ithaca.

    Ithaca is dramatically under-retailed, especially considering the huge amount of disposable income here (Cornell and IC students and professors, spin-off ventures).

    Ithaca Mall, in suburban Lansing, is a throwback to the 1980s. It's a typical small-town mall that as seen better days, but isn't likely to be shuttered anytime soon. Anchoring it are a single-story mini-Sears, a single-story mini-Bon-Ton, and a fairly normal Target. The space that used to house J.C. Penny is now occupied by Dick's Sporting Goods, Best Buy, and a soon-to-be-closing Borders. Meh,

    Along Elmira Road, in the City of Ithaca, is an unremarkable assortment of big-box retailers; Wal-Mart, Lowe's, Home Depot, Kohl's, Barnes & Noble, Bed Bath and Beyond, Staples, Tractor Supply, Wegmans, Tops, auto dealers, and a few strip plazas with the usual nail salons and barber shops. The strip isn't what I'd call tacky, but it doesn't have that uber-planned feel like what one would expect out of The Most Enlightened Town in the United States either. The Elmira Strip is about a mile and a half long, and it's the only strip in town.

    The most unusual retail/commercial center in town is probably the Dewitt Mall in downtown Ithaca, an adaptive reuse project that was formerly an old elementary school. Ithacans tend to like their surroundings on the organic side, not too well manicured, and Dewitt Mall reflects that. It's home to an assortment of businesses owned by ex-hippies, including the iconic Moosewood Restaurant. Lots of the "men with long hair and women with short hair" crowd there. Downtown Ithaca is fairly healthy, with many old-guard businesses remaining (independent jewelery stores, men's clothing stores, and the like), but there's a few vacant storefronts along the Commons. The only chain stores downtown are Urban Outfitters and Ten Thousand Villages. Downtown also has two hotels (Holiday Inn and Hilton), a movie theater, and a good number of restaurants. Downtown Ithaca also has seven head glass shops. Seven.

    Ithaca actually has two busy in-town pedestrian-oriented shopping districts; the old downtown "down the hill", and Collegetown, catering to Cornell students, a few blocks and about 300' up to the east. Collegetown is quite the active place when school is in session. It's also VERY VERY urban; first floor retail, several floors of housing above, and almost no off-street surface parking,

    For "real shopping", Ithacans make road trips to Elmira, Syracuse, Rochester, or Buffalo. Ithaca does not have a Macy's.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  18. #43
    Cyburbian Rygor's avatar
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    As Ithaca falls, so falls Ithaca Falls.
    "When life gives you lemons, just say 'No thanks'." - Henry Rollins

  19. #44
    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    Great news on the shopping front in Jamestown today. Supposedly, TJ Maxx, Michael's, and Pet Smart are moving into the redeveloped Lakewood Town Center by the fall. We really don't have comparable stores locally, so this should complement our small-town mall very nicely and give locals less reason to drive all the way into Erie, PA to shop. YEEHAW!!!

  20. #45
    Cyburbian jsk1983's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Linda_D View post
    Great news on the shopping front in Jamestown today. Supposedly, TJ Maxx, Michael's, and Pet Smart are moving into the redeveloped Lakewood Town Center by the fall. We really don't have comparable stores locally, so this should complement our small-town mall very nicely and give locals less reason to drive all the way into Erie, PA to shop. YEEHAW!!!
    But no Macy's?

  21. #46
    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by jsk1983 View post
    But no Macy's?
    Macy's??? We don't even have a Target. Jamestown is the kind of place where lots of people shop at Tractor Supply regularly, myself included.

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