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Thread: new approach in prison design

  1. #1

    new approach in prison design

    hi guys,
    got anything about prison design? like a new design approach, maybe eco-friendly kinda approach...or something like visitor-friendly...or anything.

    i'm limited to checking out old dilapidated prison/city jails /penitentiaries locally, nothing much out of them except problems of overcrowing, etc...which is why i'm looking into this as a possible arch'l research.

    i'd appreciate any suggestion, comment or even a crazy idea...

    Thanks.:army

  2. #2
    Cyburbian GeogPlanner's avatar
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    i'm partial to the neo-dungeon movement...a rebirth of the dark, dank medival dungeon with parking in the rear to accomidate cars.

    rack optional.
    Information necessitating a change of design will be conveyed to the designer after and only after the design is complete. (Often called the 'Now They Tell Us' Law) - Fyfe's First Law of Revision

    We don't believe in planners and deciders making the decisions on behalf of Americans. -- George W. Bush , Scranton, PA -- 09/06/2000

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    GeogPlanner has an interesting approach. Air space might otherwise be used for property tax-paying development (most likely industrial) is wasted on prisons. House them underground. The more constant temperature of an underground location could reduce heating and cooling costs. For the most part, cells don't have windows anyway. You could develop the above ground portion of the site for other uses. I do agree, though, put the parking in the rear.

    The full dungeon approach - multiple prisoners chained to the wall, torture, etc. has merit in that it allows more opportunities to socialize with other prisoners and the guards. Rats can make a good pet for the prisoners. But These are more sociological issues than planning ones.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Jeff's avatar
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    I myself prefer the models without cable TV and weightlifting equipment.

    I am also more in favor of the iron/steel/cement architectural design as opposed to the neo traditional vinyl siding and OSB board.


  5. #5
    Cyburbian Runner's avatar
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    ten,

    I don't think that we are capable of giving good advise on this topic from here in the USofA. We have too many lawyers and too many prisoners "rights" to ever be effective in this field...


    Take for example the killer of the little girl on the loose in California right now. When he gets caught we will force him to live in a fully air conditioned and heated facility with full medical and dental care including cosmetic surgery as desired, provide a full college education, cable TV, religious services, meals prepared as he prefers (if he wants crunchy peanut butter he will be provided that too), and if he does not want to work he will not have to... After all, he has "rights"

    Rrrrrrrrr, sorry rant...

    Seems to me the French had some good eco-friendly prisons at one time, maybe in French Guiana...
    Cheers,
    UrbanRunner
    :)
    _____________________________
    WWJJD
    "What Would Jane Jacobs Do?"

  6. #6

    underground

    Originally posted by Michael Stumpf
    House them underground. The more constant temperature of an underground location could reduce heating and cooling costs. For the most part, cells don't have windows anyway.
    The full dungeon approach - multiple prisoners chained to the wall, torture, etc. has merit in that it allows more opportunities to socialize with other prisoners and the guards. Rats can make a good pet for the prisoners. But These are more sociological issues than planning ones.
    you got radical ideas...i like it. i was also thinking of the dungeon-inspired approach too, but it seems "too punishing" (i need to define this, i know) rather than "rehabilitating" criminals..and the socializing aspect would be challenging...hmmm.

    yep. maybe its enough that they be confined to a "dug in" 25 ft deep or-so-complex, with maximum security cells dug even deeper underground with "just enough" air passage from ducts or something like it...? what do you think? is it possible?

    thanks! your ideas triggered my brainwaves to the max. i'll try to beef -up this idea...keep them coming...

  7. #7
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    The idea of punishing is interesting. Paraphrasing what Lazarus Long said "if its not cruel and unusual, then its not punishment"

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