Urban planning community | #theplannerlife

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: The hammer's been dropped . . . what do I do now?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Joe Iliff's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 1997
    Location
    Clowns to the left, jokers to the right
    Posts
    1,438

    The hammer's been dropped . . . what do I do now?

    Well, for the first time ever, I'm being fired from a planning job. So, I need to posit to the great throbbing brain what I do now.

    I'm applying for all kinds of jobs, public sector, private sector, whatever. What do I do when an application, or an interviewer, asks for a "reason for leaving" my current job, or "have you ever been fired"?

    I won't lie. I was fired.

    What do I say after that? Do I state that I don't agree with the reason for which I am being dismissed? I'm being dismissed before my probation period is complete, so technically, they don't need a reason. Should I mention that?

    Should I be more aggressive, showing a interviewer that I fought for my job in a difficult environment and lost, or more accepting, showing that that's the way things go and I go with the flow?

    Will this turn off anyone who learns it, shutting me out from contending for most planning jobs?

    Help.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Budgie's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Sans Souci
    Posts
    5,265
    Quote Originally posted by Joe Iliff
    [SIZE=3][FONT=Times New Roman]Should I be more aggressive, showing a interviewer that I fought for my job in a difficult environment and lost, or more accepting, showing that that's the way things go and I go with the flow?
    First of all, being honest is mandatory. When asked why you were dismissed, you should politely explain the situation and note that no formal reason was given for you dismissal. It would be nice to know specifics, but what you want to portray is that you were doing what you thought was right and that you can see your former employers point of view (assuming they had a smidgeon of a reason to terminate your employment). You don't want to come over bitter, aggressive or vindictive.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian PlannerByDay's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2002
    Location
    In the bike lane
    Posts
    1,827
    First off, BUMMER sorry to hear that and best of luck in you job search.

    Secondly, you were "Let go" not fired, that sounds friendlier.

    As far as what to tell future employers, I guess I/we need more information as to why you were let go. Us planners are masters of words (and number for that matter) we can use words and phrases to make even the bleakest facts look positive.

    Maybe you could tell them that: Once you got the job you and your employer realized that you background and exp. were not right for the job. You felt that the employer feels that you did a satisfactory job they just realized that due to cut backs and my area of expertise that the employer felt my position and background were unnecessary.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where Valley Fever Lives
    Posts
    8,277
    Blog entries
    1

    Hmmmm.....

    Quote Originally posted by Joe Iliff
    Well, for the first time ever, I'm being fired from a planning job. So, I need to posit to the great throbbing brain what I do now.

    I'm applying for all kinds of jobs, public sector, private sector, whatever. What do I do when an application, or an interviewer, asks for a "reason for leaving" my current job, or "have you ever been fired"?

    I won't lie. I was fired.

    What do I say after that? Do I state that I don't agree with the reason for which I am being dismissed? I'm being dismissed before my probation period is complete, so technically, they don't need a reason. Should I mention that?

    Should I be more aggressive, showing a interviewer that I fought for my job in a difficult environment and lost, or more accepting, showing that that's the way things go and I go with the flow?

    Will this turn off anyone who learns it, shutting me out from contending for most planning jobs?

    Help.
    If anything this experience should show a savey employer that as long as you've got the skills and can at least match up with the opposition, you may be a better bet than most. One reason is that you will work harder regardless of fault in the previous job...(this is my guess and what I would do in your position...)
    If the removal had anything to do with saving a buck, let that be known in an interview....If you have the skills, experience and education to do the work, those who interview you are already more savey than those who would discount you based on one bad experience.....So don't worry about those who overlook you....just keep thinking that they are the one's passing a great opportunity to catch you on the rebound....
    “The way of acquiescence leads to moral and spiritual suicide. The way of violence leads to bitterness in the survivors and brutality in the destroyers. But, the way of non-violence leads to redemption and the creation of the beloved community.”
    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
    - See more at: http://www.thekingcenter.org/king-ph....r7W02j3S.dpuf

  5. #5
    Gunfighter Mastiff's avatar
    Registered
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Middle of a Dusty Street
    Posts
    6,497
    Quote Originally posted by Joe Iliff
    Well, for the first time ever, I'm being fired from a planning job. So, I need to posit to the great throbbing brain what I do now.

    I'm applying for all kinds of jobs, public sector, private sector, whatever. What do I do when an application, or an interviewer, asks for a "reason for leaving" my current job, or "have you ever been fired"?

    I won't lie. I was fired.

    What do I say after that? Do I state that I don't agree with the reason for which I am being dismissed? I'm being dismissed before my probation period is complete, so technically, they don't need a reason. Should I mention that?

    Should I be more aggressive, showing a interviewer that I fought for my job in a difficult environment and lost, or more accepting, showing that that's the way things go and I go with the flow?

    Will this turn off anyone who learns it, shutting me out from contending for most planning jobs?

    Help.

    They gave you no reason? If not... Do you think you know the reason?

    Even a letter from your boss/mayor/adminostrator explaining that you simply weren't right for the position because ________________, will help you quite a bit.

    Second, how long were you at the job? If it's a short enough time frame, leave it off the resume.

    Lastly, will they let you "quit"? If you forgo the unemployment, most employers will choose to allow you that much. Then you can simply explain to prospective employers that you and the management had "fundamental disagreements" on how planning should be implemented, and therefore, the place was not right for you.

    Good luck, Bud...
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    C'mon and get me you twist of fate
    I'm standing right here Mr. Destiny
    If you want to talk well then I'll relate
    If you don't so what cause you don't scare me

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Trail Nazi's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Encroaching on something
    Posts
    2,744
    I am so sorry to hear about your job. However, it is not that bad. I would say that things just did not work out. Technically, you are not fired when you are let go during the probationary period because you were not "hired" in the sense of the word. I would ask if you could turn in a resignation letter first prior to them letting you go. Then you don't have to deal with that strangeness of what to put down.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Cheese State
    Posts
    10,075
    The public sector is political, and most directors know that very well. When I was an undergrad in public administration, I was told more than once to expect to be fired or asked to leave a position. I was rescued from that situation myself a year ago when the business community strongly came to my defense. Once before, I left a company after disagreeing with management over what I considered a matter of ethics. I now use that to my advantage in an interview, using it to tell them that I have high standards and won't be corrupted.

    Use your experience the same way. Explain that you had a fundemental disagreement with management, or that the political situation was hostile, or whatever. Let the story tell something of your character. But save that story for the interview. You do not have room for that on an application, and it is too easy for something like that to look like you were let go because you did not do the work. It is fair enough to state that you left due to a disagreement with management.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  8. #8
    Mod Gedunker's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2003
    Location
    The Wonderland Way
    Posts
    10,115
    Sorry to hear the news Joe: hope it wasn't anything about, you know, slacking and what not...

    Keep this in mind along with what others have already said: your most recent employer will not say anything bad about you if they are contacted by a prospective employer, or they risk serious ramifications if you find out about it.

    Good luck in the interim. Keep your head up and feel free to bouce other questions off the Trobbing Brian(tm).
    Not valid without corporate seal

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Joe Iliff's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 1997
    Location
    Clowns to the left, jokers to the right
    Posts
    1,438

    Responses

    It would be nice to know specifics . . .
    Do you think you know the reason?
    The stated reason is that my site plan review skills aren't up to the department's standard. From my point of view, the standard is unreasonable and no one without years of experience working for the department can meet it. Without being immodest, [/modesty] I'm a pretty damn good planner who does a very good job reviewing site plans. [modesty] I don't think it's reasonable to expect me (as a planner II with 0 experience in this city) to replicate the performance of a senior planner with four years of experience here.
    If the removal had anything to do with saving a buck . . .
    No. That wasn't a factor, as far as I know.
    Even a letter from your boss/mayor/adminostrator explaining that you simply weren't right for the position because ________________, will help you quite a bit.
    My boss has indicated he'll give me a good recommendation. Has lots of good things to say about my customer service, long range planning, and mapping skills. Just not "what they hired me for". I've listed him as a reference on my resume.
    Technically, you are not fired when you are let go during the probationary period because you were not "hired" in the sense of the word.
    That's a great idea! I'd not thought of that! Thanks!
    I would ask if you could turn in a resignation letter first prior to them letting you go.

    Well, as I said the hammer's been dropped. It's water under the bridge (or it is water over the dam?), but since I left my previous job in January without having another job lined up, would leaving a second one have made me seem too flighty, bouncing from one job to another every six months? Would leaving by choice with nothing else lined up seem worse or better than not having my probationary period end with permanent employment?

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Tom R's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Akron
    Posts
    2,255

    da boot

    Quote Originally posted by Budgie
    First of all, being honest is mandatory.
    I couldn't agree more.
    I was fired from my last job though my situation was different. My position was classified (under civil service protection, thus they needed a reason to can me) but, a new administration came in and changed my job to unclassified and the day that became official was the day they called me upstaires and handed me a letter.

    Anyone that has been in planning for any length of time knows that people come and go a lot either voluntarily or otherwise. Be honest and if there was a skill lacking or other specific problem with your performance, it would help if you took a class or in some way made an effort to correct the problem. If it was a misfit between you and your past job, explain it IF ASKED. Sell your positive aspects and don't hide but don't emphasize any shortcommings.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where Valley Fever Lives
    Posts
    8,277
    Blog entries
    1

    Long Range Planner

    Sounds like you may enjoy long range planning anyway.....not everyone has to get stuck as a "processor" (aka current planning).
    “The way of acquiescence leads to moral and spiritual suicide. The way of violence leads to bitterness in the survivors and brutality in the destroyers. But, the way of non-violence leads to redemption and the creation of the beloved community.”
    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
    - See more at: http://www.thekingcenter.org/king-ph....r7W02j3S.dpuf

  12. #12
    Cyburbian Salmissra's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    5,312
    Quote Originally posted by Joe Iliff
    [
    Well, as I said the hammer's been dropped. It's water under the bridge (or it is water over the dam?), but since I left my previous job in January without having another job lined up, would leaving a second one have made me seem too flighty, bouncing from one job to another every six months? Would leaving by choice with nothing else lined up seem worse or better than not having my probationary period end with permanent employment?
    Well, Joe, I've been in your shoes, and at the same city! If asked, state honestly that the position was not a right fit for you. That's what I did when interviewing afterwards. If asked for more specifics, I stated that the job description I was given and evaluated on, was not the job I was asked to do once hired.

    If you leave R****tt off your resume, there will be a 10 month gap to explain. And there might turn up some unanswered questions, since the planning world is pretty small, and someone else might mention to the interviewer that "oh, I thought he was working in R****tt", or something along those lines. I say leave it on the resume, and explain the short term issue honestly - not a right fit, plus political issues, and you're set.

    Of course, you could just chuck it all and go back to school full time. That would explain a very large gap in employment!
    "We do not need any other Tutankhamun's tomb with all its treasures. We need context. We need understanding. We need knowledge of historical events to tie them together. We don't know much. Of course we know a lot, but it is context that's missing, not treasures." - Werner Herzog, in Archaeology, March/April 2011

  13. #13
    Gunfighter Mastiff's avatar
    Registered
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Middle of a Dusty Street
    Posts
    6,497
    My boss has indicated he'll give me a good recommendation. Has lots of good things to say about my customer service, long range planning, and mapping skills. Just not "what they hired me for". I've listed him as a reference on my resume.

    Nope, that's perfect. Even if you were let go... they still liked your work. If I were hiring, it wouldn't influence my decision a bit. A letter is golden, and if you have to fill out an app for a new job, don't put "fired" or "terminated", put something in there like "see attached letter".

    No one can fault you for not being a good fit at a new job. That's one of the reasons they have probationary periods. See if he'll write you just a short letter stating what he told you.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    C'mon and get me you twist of fate
    I'm standing right here Mr. Destiny
    If you want to talk well then I'll relate
    If you don't so what cause you don't scare me

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 8
    Last post: 30 Oct 2013, 4:42 PM
  2. Oops! I dropped it! Now what?
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 24
    Last post: 31 Oct 2010, 11:19 AM
  3. Replies: 23
    Last post: 23 Oct 2009, 9:04 AM