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Thread: Anyone into boxing, kickboxing, MMA or any martial arts?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian jread's avatar
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    Anyone into boxing, kickboxing, MMA or any martial arts?

    I was in Tae Kwon Do for 4 years and made it to 1st degree black belt. Currently, I'm training in Muay Thai kickboxing and I love it! The conditioning you get from the training is great (same as boxing) and it keeps you in such good shape. I'm at local club here in Austin: http://www.vasquezacademy.com Great school with lots of talented fighters. I'm there 3 to 4 nights a week, 2 1/2 hours each night.

    Does anyone else train in any of these arts?

    Here's a pic of me in training (I'm the guy):


  2. #2
    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
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    I used to think about it, but the idea of a teacher saying "you, fight this guy!" seemed a little off-putting. I would want the one on one Mr. Miagi class instead.

    Besides, I can't even touch my toes.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian jread's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Seabishop
    I used to think about it, but the idea of a teacher saying "you, fight this guy!" seemed a little off-putting. I would want the one on one Mr. Miagi class instead.

    Besides, I can't even touch my toes.
    Ah, sparring isn't that bad. It's controlled and lighter contact. You don't just go in there and beat the crap out of each other... it's more of practicing and applying what you've learned. Plus, you wear protective gear that keeps you from getting any significant injuries. Most people are afraid to spart until they actually do it, then they can't get enough of it

    I can't touch my toes either... it's not important. You can start no matter what your physical condition is. You will get in shape over time. They don't expect you to walk in there and be "Super Keeeyaaa Champion Fighter" on the first day

  4. #4
    Cyburbian
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    Capoeira Angola. 7 years. We don't really clobber each other much. People think we need to be able to do the splits for it.. no, but you do need a flexible spine, shoulders, and wrists. But then, noone really knows what we do anyway period, so...

  5. #5
    maudit anglais
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    Quote Originally posted by jread
    Here's a pic of me in training (I'm the guy):
    Did she kick your ass?

  6. #6
    Cyburbian jread's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Tranplanner
    Did she kick your ass?
    We were training, not fighting. She's holding the thai pads for me to punch/kick. If we did spar, though, I'd have to look out because she's VERY good and quite aggressive in the ring. I've seen her put some guys into the ropes many times

  7. #7
    Cyburbian JNL's avatar
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    Seabishop - not being able to touch your toes doesn't mean you're unfit - it's about flexibility. Often guys who bulk up with big muscles end up with reduced flexibility. I couldn't touch my toes until I started doing Pilates for improved flexibility - now I can put my palms flat on the ground!

    Anyway, back on-topic, I tried kickboxing once but after 2 hours I was exhausted and my knuckles were split -ouch. Too much for a newbie! But the club was run at the university, and the instructors were volunteers, and there were heaps of new people and not enough instructors to help us out. So it was hardly ideal.

    I really liked learning to punch and kick properly to have maximum impact while avoiding injury. But I also got that from going to a tae-bo aerobics class, which suits me better, because I'm not interested in fighting other people, just fitness and self defence.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by JNL
    Seabishop - not being able to touch your toes doesn't mean you're unfit - it's about flexibility. Often guys who bulk up with big muscles end up with reduced flexibility. . .
    Yeah...that's why I'm not flexible...my huge muscles keep getting in the way.

    I didn't think sparring would be like "Fight Club" but it was more the awkwardness of it I guess. Most things that seem awkward aren't as bad once you do them.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian jread's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by JNL
    But I also got that from going to a tae-bo aerobics class, which suits me better, because I'm not interested in fighting other people, just fitness and self defence.
    I fail to see how tae-bo teaches self defense

  10. #10
    Cyburbian biscuit's avatar
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    I had two years of Tae Kwon Do during high school and really enjoyed it. I can still remember a lot of the moves, but unfortunately I've let myself go since then and probably couldn't do any of them if I tried.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Dragon's avatar
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    Iíve been busy for a while, and just caught this thread.

    I took Tae Kwon Do for around 2 years before I turned 16 and was told to get a job. I loved it, and would like to get back into it. I tore a groin muscle that set me back a lot as far as flexibility and quickness in my legs. However, some work will get me back into shape.

    I learned quickly that you get out of it what you put into it. Me practicing at home after school did a lot to further my development.

    As far as sparing goes, I was very nervous in the beginning, but after my first few bouts, I loved it. After a while, you learn what will and wonít work in a given situation. It gives you more confidence should you ever find yourself in a situation. Personally, I donít think it encourages fighting because you realize how badly you could hurt someone, and would only use it as a last resort.

    I wish I had the extra money to continue my lessons.
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  12. #12
    Cyburbian
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    Doing Tae Kwon Do now, my mentor is my six year old son who just turned brown belt. I am a yellow belt at present (only a few months in). I actually enjoy the hitting part, must have something to do with on the job frustrations - Take that you idiot applicant!!!!!
    Planning is much like acting, as my old theater professor used to say, "If you sin, sin boldly, only you know if you are ad libbing." I follow this adage almost daily.

  13. #13
    I took up Ninjitzu - yes, from the term Ninja- it teaches the basic principles of Tae Kwon Do, however uses more leg action. Kick boxing is a great compliment to this.
    And, not only is it a great work out, and for a woman, It has helped me with my self confidence when I am out running in the hood- I can take down any guy, at any height or weight, with little effort.

  14. #14
    Cyburbian JNL's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by jread
    I fail to see how tae-bo teaches self defense
    You are right, they are different. What I didn't explain, because I wanted to be quick, was that I went to a fitness class for a while that was a hybrid of tae-bo and self-defence. It was a lot of fun. I've never actually done tae-bo.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian Hceux's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by JusticeZero
    Capoeira Angola. 7 years. We don't really clobber each other much. People think we need to be able to do the splits for it.. no, but you do need a flexible spine, shoulders, and wrists. But then, noone really knows what we do anyway period, so...
    Last summer, I came across a video of some dudes doing capoeira. It's impressive stuff, I must say. How do you as a beginner get into it?? Is it very common? Or is it rare and a challenge to find classes in this?

  16. #16
    Cyburbian
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    It's rare but it exists in all of it's various forms and you can find some form of it (usually flashy and not terribly high quality) in a lot of major cities. I stumbled across some discussion on it online and found out one of the people discussing was in Anchorage, called him up and talked, met in a park and did some moves. Turned it into a weekly thing for a bit. It picked up momentum and we got other people teaching for a bit as his contacts moved from place to place, wandered in and took over when appropriate, then I went off to school and stumbled across it there pretty much by accident (but I knew what to look for) and studied under one teacher, then transferred over to their colleague in the same city and trained with them until I graduated from college. I keep in touch with him regularly and work on things, and stand in for him running a class as a monitor.
    So no, it's not like there's a brighly lit studio in the phone book where you can sign up (if there is, it's a rule it's going to be pricy and not necessarily good), the most highly visible studio I trained in had a letter size, slightly faded laminated black and white sign taped to the door under the fliers for the kung fu classes. It's all about networking and the like for the most part.

  17. #17
    I did Aiuchi jui-jitsu for 3 years while a student - I gave up on grading after my third as I felt that I didn't take the art seriously enough and that as I was only studying for 8 months out of 12, I wasn't good enough. I got to orange belt, 3 tags, but continued to train and often helped out with the white-belts and yellow-belts. I guess because the sensei felt they wouldn't be too intimidated training with me. I've also studied t'ai chi (for about a year) and fencing (for about 2). I enjoyed all of them, but none of them were quite right for me. If I ever end up near a capoiera or gracey/brazilian jui-jitsu place, I think I'll have a go, just to try it. I'm currently wondering about a tae-kwon-do club and a jeet-kune-do (sp?) club near me.
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  18. #18
    Cyburbian Man With a Plan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Seabishop
    Yeah...that's why I'm not flexible...my huge muscles keep getting in the way.

    I didn't think sparring would be like "Fight Club" but it was more the awkwardness of it I guess. Most things that seem awkward aren't as bad once you do them.
    I found an old picture of Seabishop "speaking" with a professor and myself when we were in planning school. If I remember correctly he wasn't exactly awkward about sparring back then.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Cobra Kai.jpg  

  19. #19
    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Man With a Plan
    I found an old picture of Seabishop "speaking" with a professor and myself when we were in planning school. If I remember correctly he wasn't exactly awkward about sparring back then.
    I got your "paradigm" right here Dr. Smarty Pants!

    Really, I'm a black belt of love not combat.

  20. #20
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
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    since soccer for adults doesn't seem to exist in America's Home Town i've begun to search for exercise alternatives. i've always been interested in martial arts. i even took one semester of judo in college. i've looked around and there seem to be a few dojos in town.

    have any of you started martial arts later in life?

    what should i be looking for in a dojo? what should i expect to pay?
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  21. #21
    Cyburbian cch's avatar
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    The only martial art I ever took was T'ai Chi at the YMCA . But my husband is very much into Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and he goes to this place www.teamcurran.com. His instructor is the 9th rated no-holds-barred fighter in the world in his weight class, and he just signed on to do some Pride Fighting in Japan. My husband is still a white belt, but he tapped out a purple belt last week, cause he has a lot of books and videos that he studies from at home. He worked up to a brown belt in Judo before I ever met him, and he went to his current school for several months before our daughter was born, but just now got back into it.

    He's taught me a lot of self defense stuff, cause with Jiu Jitsu it doesn't matter how big you are, and being on the ground on your back actually puts you at an advantage. All the best MMA and no-holds-barred fighters use it.

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