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Thread: Combining planning/urban design and Feng Shui practices:

  1. #1
    Cyburbian jread's avatar
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    Combining planning/urban design and Feng Shui practices:

    I doubt too many planners are into feng shui practices but it is quite interesting how it is used in the rest of the world. Anyone who has tried applying the ideas to their home usually experiences some sort of improvement, whether the beliefs are actually true or if it's just that one's environment truly does affect their mind and well-being (completely believable).

    Feng shui outside of the home environment has everything to do with the topography, design and planning of building and cities. Many Eastern cities have been designed according to feng shui guidelines such as Hong Kong (the most famous one). One would have to agree that Hong Kong is a very pleasing city with an incredible skyline.

    I think that the thought of combining feng shui with urban design and planning in the West may be an interesting thing to do. The only problem would be finding enough people living in one area who are into it

  2. #2
    Cyburbian PlannerByDay's avatar
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    Now this will be interesting.

    My mom gave me a book on this when I bought my second house. I got about 10 pages into it and dumped it.

    Way to cosmic and strange for me. I arranged my stuff for function and if there was already a nail in the wall for a picture I hung one up there, i hate putting holes in my wall.

  3. #3
    I am not that familiar with the art of Fung Shui but I have no doubt that it works. Whether that is a function of placement of objects or the faith that it will work is the question. However that doesn't really matter if YOU think it works then you will benefit. The mind is a wonderous thing.

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    Cyburbian boilerplater's avatar
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    When the British went to the Chinese looking for a coastal area on which to build a port city, the Chinese offered them the land that is now Hong Kong, since it had bad Feng Shui. The buildable land was a narrow strip between the ocean and steep slopes. The ground was rocky. But as the British started to build, the Chinese were surprised to see them doing things that "corrected" the bad Feng Shui like planting trees on steep slopes to hold the soil in place. So there is a lot of cross-cultural wisdom that has an actual scientific base in Feng Shui. In East Asian countries today, no major building is sited without first consulting a FS master.
    Adrift in a sea of beige

  5. #5
    Cyburbian jread's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by boilerplater
    When the British went to the Chinese looking for a coastal area on which to build a port city, the Chinese offered them the land that is now Hong Kong, since it had bad Feng Shui. The buildable land was a narrow strip between the ocean and steep slopes. The ground was rocky. But as the British started to build, the Chinese were surprised to see them doing things that "corrected" the bad Feng Shui like planting trees on steep slopes to hold the soil in place. So there is a lot of cross-cultural wisdom that has an actual scientific base in Feng Shui. In East Asian countries today, no major building is sited without first consulting a FS master.
    Thank you for that very interesting info

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Coragus's avatar
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    I read an article a couple years ago where a council in a city in California (I don't remember the name of the town) voted down a proposed fire hall, which everyone agreed was a needed asset to the community, because a group of activists showed up to complain about the site's feng shui. So, it is possible that it is something that could come into a planner's life, and we should therefore be aware of it.

    Having said that, from the books I've read on it, there are always simple fixes and loop holes that you can incorporate, you just have to know what they are.

    Here's a hint that I just read in a publication I read. Put a living rounded leaf plant in the eastern part of your living room and watch your income grow.

    \somewhat skeptical
    The cookies are worth the drive

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