Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 48

Thread: Street name ideas

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Kings Co., New Brunswick
    Posts
    9

    Street name ideas

    What do you who are developers or planners consider when naming streets, especially more than one at a time? Does your municipality require themes or have any other regulations? If so, what are some examples. Do you name them after nature? People you know?

  2. #2
    Cyburbian ABS's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    104
    It's probably more to do with marketing then anything...

    Developers usually name developments after whatever they destroy.
    Great mindless think alike.

    Planning my way out of wet paper bag since 2003

  3. #3
    Cyburbian natski's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2005
    Location
    In my own little bubble
    Posts
    2,564
    Its funny this post has come up today as i am currently working on a report to go up to my Council on road and park names in a new development.

    We (being Council) required the developer to chose names to represent both the aboriginal and european heritage of the site. After months of debate and discussion we have settled on names- surnames of people who got land grants in the locality and aboriginal words that represent the native flora, fauna and proposed uses of the site.

    Mind you i know a suburb near where i live that is made up of plant names and some people down the road built a street for their subdivision and got it named after them

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Mtn Woman's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2004
    Location
    deep in the Hundred Acre Wood
    Posts
    149
    A town in my area used to name roads after the local men killed in action. An interesting way to keep their memories alive. Problem is that the population is small and the same families have lived here for years so the roads have to be the FULL NAME of the deceased. Makes it interesting for the 911 dispatchers... "Was that George Smith or Harry Smith Road???"
    LOTs of families have lost multiple members in various wars, police actions, rescue missions, etc.
    Living and dreaming are two different things-but you can't do one without the other."
    -Malcolm Forbes

  5. #5

    Dead presidents

    Our East/West street names are the last names of the presidents, in order. These streets run parallel, with Washington to the North, then going Southward, Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, etc.
    Who's gonna re-invent the wheel today?

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Random Traffic Guy's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Lone Star State
    Posts
    637
    Just make it short, I hate trying to fit long names on my exhibits. Also, only one road-synonym per name. In one local development, named Park Lane Place (being located on Park Lane, good enough), their main access road was named "Park Lane Place Drive". Ugh...

  7. #7
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    in a meeting
    Posts
    8,698
    many developers in one town i worked in named streets after their kids - and someone named a street after their dog

    another town i worked in, we made the developer consult with local historical society so that the street would be named after a historic family that lived there, owned the land once, etc - i liked this method alot!

    here, it's whatever, i can't get the board interested in monitoring that, which is too bad, really -

    but the real goal is to make sure that you have a check on the street names proposed to make sure you don't have 2 streets named alike or even similar - as in blueberry lane, blueberry street - enlist your fire/police people for support of that in the name of 911

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Plus
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    De Noc
    Posts
    18,477
    AIB luckless pedestrian comment about street names and 911 --
    We have a 911 Dispatch supervisor sit in & ask for comments in subdivision review.
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Tide's avatar
    Registered
    Oct 2005
    Location
    The Gig City
    Posts
    2,664
    Quote Originally posted by JNA
    AIB luckless pedestrian comment about street names and 911 --
    We have a 911 Dispatch supervisor sit in & ask for comments in subdivision review.
    I'm on the local fire dept (volunteer) and we have a subdivision with the following names;
    Elwood,
    Cherrywood,
    Brentwood,
    Buttonwood,
    Crestwood,
    Lynnwood,
    Haywood

    Need I say more... very confusing I ALWAYS have to look at the map (was it the 3rd right or 4th?)
    @GigCityPlanner

  10. #10
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Down by Dun Ringill
    Posts
    6,126
    Blog entries
    6
    We allow developers to suggest names for their proposed roads, then the addressing coordinator checks them to see if they are acceptable (won't cause confusion to emergency service providers).
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  11. #11
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 1996
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    7,652
    Quote Originally posted by JNA
    AIB luckless pedestrian comment about street names and 911 --
    We have a 911 Dispatch supervisor sit in & ask for comments in subdivision review.
    We do the same. All street names need to be approved by Assessing and Emergency Services.
    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

  12. #12
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Section 14-12-7, 3rd PM
    Posts
    2,096
    Quote Originally posted by luckless pedestrian
    many developers in one town i worked in named streets after their kids - and someone named a street after their dog
    When I draw a plat, until the developer gives me names to put in, I put in my kids names. Almost got one recorded that way

  13. #13
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    in a meeting
    Posts
    8,698
    Quote Originally posted by savemattoon
    When I draw a plat, until the developer gives me names to put in, I put in my kids names. Almost got one recorded that way

    ooh, i like that idea....hehehehe

    your avatar is creepin' me out, i'm an arachnophobe (sp)

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Plus
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    De Noc
    Posts
    18,477
    On the front page of my fair city's newspaper:
    Picking street name not so easy
    By Jacob Bennett

    Almost every town has Main and Elm streets, but only one has streets named after Jerry Aigner's schoolteachers.

    Aigner and his brothers decided to honor beloved teachers at the long-closed Elberfeld School by naming the streets after them at his Hornet Hills subdivision in Elberfeld, Ind. It was a moment of rare inspiration among folks who christen blacktop. He already has honored Martin Blesch, the grade school basketball coach; Jim Harbison, the high school history and social studies teacher; Dolly and Clara Hebbler; and Wilford Wheaton, the fifth-grade teacher.

    "We use lakes and trees and animals and stuff like that, and sunsets and so on and so forth," said Aigner, who with his brothers has built a handful of subdivisions in Warrick County. "It's hard to find unique names."

    Temporarily at least, Hornet Hills, named for the Elberfeld School mascot, solved a problem common to those who blaze trails to suburbia - with nearly 2,500 roads in Vanderburgh County alone, all the good names are taken. Sometimes the Vanderburgh County Area Plan Commission looks at other cities' directories for ideas, and it used to have a master list of possible names because developers often would ask for suggestions. That list is lost; it was used up anyway.

    "Trees are gone, flowers are gone," said Beverly Behme, the Vanderburgh County zoning administrator.

    Developers sometimes dig deep for ideas. A stroke of inspiration can provide names for several streets at once.

    In Newburgh, there are streets named after champion race horses: Citation and Secretariat Drives run into Ruffian Lane, all behind the Triple Crown Center.

    Evansville turned to presidents (Lincoln, Washington, Adams) and to states (Kentucky, Indiana, Virginia) and to memories of World War II (MacArthur, Roosevelt and Corregidor).

    So far, Evansville has no streets that begin with the letter X.

    Most new streets link blocks of housing developments. Private drives also have to be named if there is more than one house off the driveway or if the home is hard to see from the main road. This makes it easier for emergency officials to find the houses there.

    In Indiana, Kentucky and Illinois, either 911 or local government officials review new street names to make sure there are no duplicates or soundalikes. North, south, east, west are off-limits, Behme said. A road called North Pine Drive would be confusing if it ran east to west.

    Howard Wells and a couple of engineers from Andy Easley Civil Engineering named the roads of Mill Creek Estates after Big Ten college basketball teams. I.U. Drive came first on the south end of the community, then came Wolverine Drive. But the post office wouldn't let them name the northernmost road after Northwestern because the directions would be confusing.

    Wells' suggestion: Wildcat Pass, after the University of Kentucky nickname.

    The name hasn't caused friction with the folks on I.U. Drive.

    "They're far enough away from IU they don't cause any problems," Wells said. "We keep them separated so there's no fights."

    Some residents have fun living on streets with unusual names.

    Several people posted replies when Mike Thomas, 21, of Newburgh and his girlfriend, Jaharidan Calhoun, 21, flaunted her address on the college Web site facebook.com: "If you like beer, come to Corona Drive." Calhoun's street in Hornbrook Estates is named after the beer; it intersects with Amstel Drive, another brand of beer.

    Thomas said he has had Corona beer, but never in the apartment on the street that shares its name.

    "I've never thought about that one," he said.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Unusual street names in the Tri-State
    Slim Bottoms Road, Mount Vernon
    Calle Las Colinas
    Camel Court
    Carlsbad, Yosemite and Glacier Drives
    Robin Hood Lane intersects with Prince John Lane
    Five Dollar Road
    Golden Rule Road
    Seminary Road West
    Gun Powder Lane
    Jobes Lane
    Pirates Alley
    Little Schmuck Road
    Swinging Way
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  15. #15
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
    Registered
    Sep 2001
    Location
    skating on thin ice
    Posts
    6,958
    Quote Originally posted by mylkman
    What do you who are developers or planners consider when naming streets, especially more than one at a time? Does your municipality require themes or have any other regulations? If so, what are some examples. Do you name them after nature? People you know?
    From my NB knowledge:

    1) Make sure the sounds are acceptable in both english and french
    2) Check with your local volunteer fire departments for how roads are locally described, the "real" name may not mean much, but you don't want to cause confusion.
    3) Service NB/911 is supposed to review them all to make sure they are OK.

    Considering you are in Kings County. I can assume who you work for, if you work for a planning commission, or even a municipality, can I suggest a few names for you?
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  16. #16
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Appleton, Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,174
    Street names and addressing can be a pain in the you-know-what here, too.

    The Appleton postal area has:

    Northwood Dr
    Southwood Dr
    Eastwood Ct
    Westwood Ct
    N. Wood St

    Also:
    Partridge Ct
    Park Ridge Av

    Shawnee Ln
    Shoshone Ct

    Associated Dr
    Association Dr

    plus many other similar confusions.

    (I'd like to see a developer use names from the Lord of the Rings/Hobbit. )

    In addition to the Post Office and the police/fire people, I wouldn't mind seeing proposed new street names being run through the local pizza delivery companies. They have to find addresses fast just as or more often than some of the 911 guys do and bad addressing is a big problem for them, too.

    BTW, at least in the city, without a special exception by the city council, Appleton now limits new street names to one word of no more than 12 letters and no use of a cardinal direction and several syllables including 'wood'.

    Quote Originally posted by savemattoon
    When I draw a plat, until the developer gives me names to put in, I put in my kids names. Almost got one recorded that way
    I have often pondered having a notation of 'future street' on a plat getting through to being recorded.

    Mike

  17. #17
    Cyburbian jmello's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Clayobyrne, CB
    Posts
    2,581
    Quote Originally posted by mylkman
    What do you who are developers or planners consider when naming streets, especially more than one at a time? Does your municipality require themes or have any other regulations? If so, what are some examples. Do you name them after nature? People you know?
    Quite a few municipalities in Massachusetts require all new streets to be named after local veterans killed in action.

  18. #18
    Cyburbian Random Traffic Guy's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Lone Star State
    Posts
    637
    Quote Originally posted by mgk920
    (I'd like to see a developer use names from the Lord of the Rings/Hobbit. )
    An equestrian-opriented development I've worked on had one of the streets as "Glamdring Trail"... I would not want to describe that over the phone often. But it was mixed with a bunch of castle- and knight-related names, nothing else Tolkien. I don't mind a good theme, especially if it has some local connection.

  19. #19
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    in a meeting
    Posts
    8,698
    Quote Originally posted by jmello
    Quite a few municipalities in Massachusetts require all new streets to be named after local veterans killed in action.
    that's a nice idea too -

    but since the town I work for here in Maine held a special town meeting to formally oppose the war in Iraq, we'd find a way to politicize that -

  20. #20
    Cyburbian Iron Ring's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2005
    Location
    In the "Interior".
    Posts
    90
    Quote Originally posted by mgk920
    I'd like to see a developer use names from the Lord of the Rings/Hobbit.
    I used to live near a neighbourhood with street names like:
    Sherwood, Archer, Robin Hood, Nottingham, Marianne, Little John, even a Friar Tuck.

    There's certainly lots of interesting stuff to choose from in LOR and it can't be any worse than more tree names!

    ps actually these are all in Kings County mylkman

  21. #21
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    9,327
    This Bear may be just a fake city planner (King of Amish Sim City) but when working on my plats I often have to stop and think about what I want to name by streets. My technique? I keep a couple state gazetteers handy, pop them open to a random page, and pick out a name of a city, county, landmark, hill, river, stream, lake, etc.

    Example:

    My Michigan Gazetteer is in my hands right now. Open it up, randomly. Pick a name in the center of the page.....Churchill Road.

    Easy.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  22. #22
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Appleton, Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,174
    Quote Originally posted by Bear Up North
    This Bear may be just a fake city planner (King of Amish Sim City) but when working on my plats I often have to stop and think about what I want to name by streets. My technique? I keep a couple state gazetteers handy, pop them open to a random page, and pick out a name of a city, county, landmark, hill, river, stream, lake, etc.

    Example:

    My Michigan Gazetteer is in my hands right now. Open it up, randomly. Pick a name in the center of the page.....Churchill Road.

    Easy.

    Bear
    I would also think that the local phone book would contain a treasure trove of potential street names, and the bigger the metro area, the more potential names to pick from.

    Mike

  23. #23
    Cyburbian Otis's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Upper left edge
    Posts
    4,055
    Our north-south streets are required to corrspond to a specific set on names, in alphabetical oreder from west to east, starting with Anchor and going through Zephyr. They have nautical themes. The east-west are numbered. The city is divided into four quandrants, NW, NE, SW, SE. We adopted the rules for 911 response.

    A problem develops because topography, coupled with past development practice, requires discontinuous streets, so NE Oar Avenue may be in several individual segments. Developers hate it when I tell them Happy Fuzzy Puppy Lane is going to be named NE 51st Street.

  24. #24
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
    Registered
    May 2005
    Location
    The Fox Valley
    Posts
    4,820
    Blog entries
    1
    In one of my Amish Sim Cities, I tend to use themes.

    Such as:
    Indian tribes
    Common American first names
    Preisidents
    Kinds of trees
    Kinds of birds
    Names relating to U.S. landforms
    Wild animals
    Cities in Iowa
    Cities in Ohio
    Cities in Virginia
    Cities in Minnesota
    Cities in Canada
    Suburbs of Los Angeles
    Suburbs of Miami/W. Palm
    Suburbs of Phoenix
    Midwestern cities
    American capitals
    Words relating to farming
    The Great Lakes
    U.S. Rivers
    Prestigious universities
    Random U.S. suburbs
    Chicago suburbs
    Towns in my favorite vacation spot
    Golfing-related words

    I also use Excel to make a database of my streets to prevent duplicates.
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
    -Steven Tyler

  25. #25
    Member
    Registered
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Kings Co., New Brunswick
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally posted by Iron Ring
    ps actually these are all in Kings County mylkman
    Gondola Point (Well, Quispamsis, )

+ Reply to thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

More at Cyburbia

  1. A few ideas I have
    Design, Space, and Place
    Replies: 1
    Last post: 09 Sep 2013, 7:28 PM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last post: 09 Nov 2012, 2:51 PM
  3. Replies: 7
    Last post: 12 Sep 2005, 2:05 PM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last post: 15 Sep 2004, 2:29 PM
  5. They want my ideas!!!
    Make No Small Plans
    Replies: 21
    Last post: 30 Dec 2003, 2:32 PM