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Thread: Are you prepared?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Are you prepared?

    The Boy Scout motto of “Be Prepared” is taken too far by some people known as “preppers”, but not nearly far enough by most. Instead, the average person goes about their day to day activities with total faith and reliance on the basic comforts that we have, including water, sewer, gas, electricity, shelter, and transportation.

    But every once in a while something comes along that tosses a wrench into the works. More often than not, it is weather related. Tornados, hurricanes, blizzards, floods, and other natural events all can disrupt our day to day activities, comfort, and our lives. I know that there have been many times in the past (as recent as this past Monday) where my normal comforts have been disrupted.

    How prepared are you for a natural disaster? Are you an all-out prepper or are you the opposite and if the power did not turn on you would be in trouble? Do you have a “bug out bag” or other emergency kit? What about stockpiles of food, water, and supplies? Do you have a plan in the event that you are not home and something happens and the roads are closed?
    There is no such thing as failure, only learning experiences. However, it is our choice to learn the lesson and change or not.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Vancity's avatar
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    I don't prepare in any way. The only natural disaster around here to worry about is earth quakes. They're expecting "The Big One" within the next few-hundred years (we are 100 years overdue)... and it's supposedly going to be the largest recorded earth quake in human history.

    My father is a weird sort of prepper type.. he thinks the world is going to run out of food, and so he's bought a farm, put some chickens on it, and began to grow is own vegetables, and make his own bread and alcohol.

    I don't know I just think that stuff is silly. I carry a cell-phone. That's how I prepare.

  3. #3
    OH....IO Hink's avatar
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    I think the government is going to take over so I have stock piled rocks and pitchforks. I am sure this will protect me from this invasion as well as guns and they are MUCH cheaper. I will lose of course, but at least I tried....

    Oh that and I am moving to Idaho. You know because I am more protected there from invasion.
    A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. -Douglas Adams

  4. #4
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Since I was a teen I've been plagued with the idea that at some point during my lifetime civilization as we know it would experience either a total breakdown or at least a major hiccup. I suspect this gnawing feeling is not that uncommon among folks of my generation who grew up during the Cold War and had to read books for English classes like "Alas Babylon" (a post nuclear war tale). We have some sensible precautionary things in basement for emergencies or times when the power goes out like lanterns, candles, a few gallons of water, and the canned produce from our garden, we also have a few books in our library on "roughing it" filled with helpful advice on camping/survival skills we keep around that could prove to be useful if disaster ever struck, but we haven't done much beyond that....not built any bomb shelters or stocked up on guns/ammo.

    I will confess that the idea of moving off the grid does appeal to me on several levels.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  5. #5
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    I'm more of a "deal with it when it happens" than a "prepare for it in case it happens." I do reasonable preparation for possible road emergencies.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Duke Of Dystopia's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Hink View post
    I think the government is going to take over so I have stock piled rocks and pitchforks. I am sure this will protect me from this invasion as well as guns and they are MUCH cheaper. I will lose of course, but at least I tried....

    Oh that and I am moving to Idaho. You know because I am more protected there from invasion.

    Until Yellowstone goes "MEGA VOLCANO" then your toast...er.... shortly doomed! No amount of prepping can help you then!
    I can't deliver UTOPIA, but I can create a HELL for you to LIVE in :)DoD:(

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Plus dvdneal's avatar
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    I have the usual tornado supplies downstairs, but nothing doomsdayish. Some water and blankets, but we store those downstairs anyway, and somewhere there is a flashlight and the weather warning thing. I miss Arizona, no emergency anything.
    I don't pretend to understand Brannigan's Law. I merely enforce it.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    I will confess that the idea of moving off the grid does appeal to me on several levels.
    I have also thought that too... in the UP they call them deer camps.

    I have to confess that now that I have a family, I am along the same focus as Maister. We have enough food, water, and supplies that would sustain us for a few weeks and an emergency "Kit" of clothes and supplies pre-packed into a plastic tote that we could toss into the Suburban if we had to evacuate because of pending weather emergency. My biggest concern is a blizzard or ice storm knocking out electricity in the winter. It has happened before and if they did not get it reconnected within 8 to 10 hours, we would need to head up to the in-laws or stay with friends until the power (and heat) could be turned back on.

    I also have an emergency kit in my car including a change of clothes in the event that I get stranded someplace.
    There is no such thing as failure, only learning experiences. However, it is our choice to learn the lesson and change or not.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Raf's avatar
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    I got a few flash lights, ready meals to last a day, and hand cranked ready... but really i have to fear is the "big one".Well that, and a Nuclear meltdown.
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  10. #10
    Cyburbian Coragus's avatar
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    I did two years of volunteer work for my county's Emergency Management Agency/Office of Homeland Security. Also, I'm an Eagle Scout. Believe me, I'm prepared. I keep supplies at home as well as a kit in my car with both first aid and survival gear.
    What do you mean I can't plan? My SimCity has 200,000 people with a 99% happiness rating!

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Plus
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    The American Red Cross message is that you should have a 72 hr kit -
    http://www.redcross.org/flash/brr/En...t-contents.asp

    Also consider including a change of clothes.


    In our area our natural hazards include flooding, tornadoes, and earthquakes, oh my.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
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    I keep a spare necktie and dress shirt in my desk at work in case I have a lunchtime disaster.
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

  13. #13
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    At first I read this thread as "are you peppered?" Not sure what that was going to be about, but now I see the light.

    We camp a lot and I do some solo backcountry camping and so we have a good array of shelters, water purifiers, stoves, and other survival gear. We even have three boats (a canoe and two kayaks) for when the flooding starts.

    I am also kind of into the DIY realm of some of this camping stuff and there is an interesting overlap between the survivalist folks and the ultra-lightweight backpacking folks. As a result, I have stumbled into some pretty interesting forums populated by folks preparing for the Zombie Apocalypse. There are some pretty interesting people out there.
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  14. #14
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by wahday View post
    There are some pretty interesting people out there.
    Oh is there ever. The people who own the land across the road from my buddy's camp in central Michigan are all out preppers... I have not met them in person, but my buddy said that they bought a couple metal shipping containers, buried them several feet in the ground and made a sectioned bunker. One time when he was up there deer hunting, we was able to see them coming and going with those 250 gallon water tanks, what looked like a wood stove, and all sorts of building materials. There are also no trespassing signs and evidence what what could be traps set up past their gate.

    For a few years, he would try to be nice to them and say hi, but they would hardly respond, always remained very secretive, and my buddy is positive that they had tried to bury a waterline from the creek at the south end of his property up to their property. He has found two 500 foot spools PEX on his property along with shovels, and have even called the police, but there is no evidence that it was that neighbor because it was never completed.

    I am surprised that no one said that they have a rotating stockpile of beer... or wine as in RJ's case.
    There is no such thing as failure, only learning experiences. However, it is our choice to learn the lesson and change or not.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    I have plenty of water on hand, because I keep several gallons at all times to fill the fish tank. My kitchen cabinets are full of food. My garage has plenty of camping supplies and a couple camping propane tanks.

    I live in a neighborhood with a lots of old people. I figure in the event of a natural disaster they will be easy pickings for any additional supplies I may need.

    So i guess I am sort of prepared. I have a plan at least.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  16. #16
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
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    I don't really have an emergency kit per se. Often, weather does throw a wrench in the works. Snowstorms, ice storms, blizzards, power outages (usually storm related or heat related), and floods seem to be the things that typically affect the area I live, keeping people homebound for a day or two. I typically have enough food and blankets and clothing and things to do in the house at any one time to tide me over a few days. I also have a battery-powered weather radio. But yeah, beyond five days or so, I don't know... The food and water supply would certainly run low.

    The most significant widespread event to affect the Chicago area in the last 20 years (as far as stranding everyone at home) was probably the Groundhog Day blizzard of 2011, where everyone was stuck at home for several days and it took quite awhile to fully clear the roads and open businesses again. Even so, it was really only 2 or 3 days before it was safe to go out again. With the exception of highly localized events like fires, tornadoes, and floods (where a small portion of the regional population could find their homes destroyed and will need help from loved ones, neighbors, their insurance companies, and the government), I really can't think of something that our area is susceptible to that would leave people stranded at home en masse without supplies for a period of time longer than 3 days. If there was a major nuclear attack or something of that sort, that's something that you really can't prepare for in my mind. I mean, let's be honest, everyone is gonna be fucked.

    I have guns and some ammo to protect myself and my property and hunt for food if necessary. But probably for only so long. I don't have a stockpile like some people, nor do I have assault weapons.
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
    -Steven Tyler

  17. #17
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    We have an evacuation box in the garage, with duck tape, plastic sheeting, can opener, hatchet, plastic utensils, etc.

    Also two camp stoves with propane, plenty of flashlights and camping lanterns and batteries, a tent and other related camping supplies, and carriers/crates for all the pets.

    We ramp up the bottled water purchases during hurricane season, keep plenty of non-perishable foods, charcoal and starter for the grill, and have a least a couple cans of gas in the garage.

    The biggie is the whole house generator, which will power the house for 3-5 days, depending on what we unplug for the duration.

    Other than keeping the cars filled with gas if a storm is approaching, and getting some extra cash and pet food, we're about as ready as we can be.

  18. #18
    Cyburbian jsk1983's avatar
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    Not expecting a natural disaster here in Chicago anytime soon so no. The worst we have is a big snowstorm every once in awhile but even that isn't that bad if you don't need to go anywhere.

  19. #19
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Raf View post
    I got a few flash lights, ready meals to last a day, and hand cranked ready... but really i have to fear is the "big one".Well that, and a Nuclear meltdown.
    It's not like the geologists and geophysicists have a web site that can post a forecast..."OK folks, all indications are we are going to experience a major seismic event in 3-1/2 to 4 days. Don't try and ride this one out. Get your shit together and head for Utah." But we can someday hope....(bet the folks in Utah don't have the same hope that a bunch of Californians aren't showing up to avoid a damaging earthquake).
    Annoyingly insensitive

  20. #20
    Cyburbian Rygor's avatar
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    Arizona is pretty well immune from natural disasters. No earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, tsunamis, etc. to speak of. Only the occasional summer dust storm, which is generally harmless and lasts only an hour at most.

    All I have for preparation is a cell phone and "The Zombie Survial Guide". I know where my flashlights/candles are. That's pretty much all I need.
    "When life gives you lemons, just say 'No thanks'." - Henry Rollins

  21. #21
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
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    I'm an Eagle Scout as well (it actually seems like I encounter a lot of them in the planning profession along with the Girl Scout Gold Award). My two year stint working for a state disaster recovery agency further cemented that. I consider myself very prepared for a natural disaster of any kind except for an earthquake. One of the big things I emphasize is having duplicates of all critical documents available at a second location (passports, deeds, vehicle titles, pet information insurance docs, medical stuff, bank info, etc.) as well as a recent video of home contents. I do a walk through video of the house every six months or after a major purchase of some kind and burn it to a DVD. I keep that stuff in a locked drawer at my office and my wife also keeps a copy at her office. I didn't start doing that until a friend of mine had his house burglarized and he had issues with his insurance. I've got enough food in the pantry that doesn't require cooking/refrigeration to last about 3-4 days, although I have a camping stove. I keep two cases of bottled water in the garage.

    I've got a pretty decent emergency kit in both cars along with a blanket & jumper cables.

    For things like nuke attacks & similar apocalypse scenarios, I just don't see the point because there is so little you can reasonably control or prepare for.

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  22. #22
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Quote Originally posted by Coragus View post
    I did two years of volunteer work for my county's Emergency Management Agency/Office of Homeland Security. Also, I'm an Eagle Scout. .
    Quote Originally posted by Suburb Repairman View post
    I'm an Eagle Scout as well (it actually seems like I encounter a lot of them in the planning profession along with the Girl Scout Gold Award). My two year stint working for a state disaster recovery agency further cemented that. .
    I am also an Eagle Scout who still volunteers for my county's EMA (Former Firefighter/EMT, gone through CERT training and ARC disaster training)

  23. #23
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    I have a bag packed with clothing, tarp, knife, gun, food, fire starters, etc. for 2-3 days. This usually stays in the upstairs closet until winter, when it goes into the back of the car in case I get stranded someplace. I could survive for a long time in my own house, given my gardening and canning, and all of the resources I have for backpacking (tents, water filters, etc.). I should probably get a small generator to run the pump for my well, then I would not have to dip into my wine cellar. The dogs could drink the water in my backyard pond.

    Our greatest threats are a tornado, which does not cause issues of survival after the storm passes, and power outages that would mainly be associated with winter storms. I have a whole lot of firewood to burn to keep warm. The big challenge would be a collapse of civilization, but then, that would be a challenge no matter what.

    Anybody watch "Doomsday Castle"? I had to watch an episode when I had a dog sleeping on me and could not reach the remote. This nutcase family is building a castle to protect them in the event civilization collapses. They are acting like it is impregnable, but it is really just a concrete block house that anybody could knock down in about ten minutes. The end of civilization does not mean that people will not have access to a bulldozer, or for that matter, weapons from the local National Guard armory.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  24. #24
    Cyburbian Big Owl's avatar
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    I too am a Eagle Scout. I am prepared for most reasonable situations, as i have supplies for 3-5 days. I have read some post-apocalyptic end of modern living type books and I find them fascinating; however, I don't at this time see that the scenarios that they describe are realistic enough to inspire me to become a prepper. Of course preppers would say when they become eminent, it's too late. I guess, I am lucky to have a prepper friend that has given me and my family an open invite to his bug out location.

    On a side note, my wife accused me of being a prepper recently. I like to target shot and in doing so can shoot through a couple hundred rounds in an afternoon. Before this most recent ammo shortage, I would just head to the gun shop to buy ammo on the way to the range. At least around my parts, ammo for my 22 has been scarce and the place that have it limits what you can purchase; so I have been buying a box here or there when i find it. Well at the same time, I haven't been to the range to shoot up what I purchased so I unknowingly amassed 1200 rounds. Once I realized it, I stopped but then my wife became aware. She was concerned that I became a closet prepper. Ironically, she told her sister, who told her husband. The next time they visited he offered to give me 2,500 rounds and explained that he got nervous when he got below 3500 rounds in a particular caliber for any of his guns. I refused his offer and my wife didn't say anything else my miniscule accumulation of ammo.

  25. #25
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    If the power went out, and we couldn't leave our house, we have enough stuff to last at least a week.
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

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