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Thread: I have a question for the resident landscape gurus-

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Habanero's avatar
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    I have a question for the resident landscape gurus-

    So, we got the sprinklers installed (by someone else, decided not to take that on) and installed most of the landscaping. Now we have a problem of a different sort- standing water where the dogs have run the ground down.

    Do I fill in the worn down area so the water all flows as it once did or will that cause more problems? None of the water is coming anywhere near the house, it's out towards the middle of the yard, but I'd like to not have a lake when it rains (and amazingly enough it's ben raining for the past two days out here).
    When Jesus said "love your enemies", he probably didn't mean kill them.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Is this a draingage issue? Or maybe a broken pipe?

    If it is draingage and grading then, filling the area in or digging a trough to drain the standing water to a lower part of yard would work.

    If there is low pressure coming from the sprinkler heads, it could be a broken pipe. PM me for more information on that or call the company that installed it and have them fix the break.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Habanero's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN
    Is this a draingage issue? Or maybe a broken pipe?

    If it is draingage and grading then, filling the area in or digging a trough to drain the standing water to a lower part of yard would work.

    If there is low pressure coming from the sprinkler heads, it could be a broken pipe. PM me for more information on that or call the company that installed it and have them fix the break.

    It's just drainage, our sprinklers have been off for the "winter" season out here. So far it's been a really wet "winter" in AZ so even when I think I may need to turn the drip system on it ends up raining.

    We've gotten a few inches in the last 24 hours and it's all just standing in the backyard.

    Thanks for the help, the lay of our backyard (before the dogs) used to have a natural grade to it to allow the water to get out to the street, but now that we've got three dogs that like to play in this area it's about 6 inches lower than the rest of the yard and everything pools there.

    Ugh, now I have to go find dirt. Where would one find dirt cheap?
    When Jesus said "love your enemies", he probably didn't mean kill them.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian boilerplater's avatar
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    How big are these dogs, to lower the grade 6 inches? Is it a heavy clay soil? Once it gets compacted, its difficult to get water infiltration. You could till it and add some organic matter to the soil to make it percolate better. Also, agricultural gypsum can be used to break up clay. It breaks the chemical bond that holds the clay particles together. If you can overcome the compaction, grass should have a better chance surviving there. Are you using one of those xeriscape grasses, like buffalo grass?

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Habanero's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by boilerplater
    How big are these dogs, to lower the grade 6 inches? Is it a heavy clay soil? Once it gets compacted, its difficult to get water infiltration. You could till it and add some organic matter to the soil to make it percolate better. Also, agricultural gypsum can be used to break up clay. It breaks the chemical bond that holds the clay particles together. If you can overcome the compaction, grass should have a better chance surviving there. Are you using one of those xeriscape grasses, like buffalo grass?
    The weimaraners are about 75-80 each and the boxer is a trim 60. It's the "grab @$$" area, and after 7 months it's been worn down. It is mostly clay too, so after it gets compacted it's hard to get anything through it. I guess the only thing we can do now is re-till the area and add more gypsum? Could I just throw some in the our lake and hope for the best?

    The grass we used is some sort of hybrid that uses hardly any water for the "norms" out here but is supposed to withstand the torture of three large dogs. So far, it did okay, but it's dormant for the winter and we didn't overseed so we've just got brown grass for now.
    When Jesus said "love your enemies", he probably didn't mean kill them.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
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    The thing is, you can fix the problem all you want, but if the dogs continue to play there, the problem will recur. I read once about dogs making a hard path around a fence perimeter. I think the recommendation was to put down pea gravel where the dogs like to run. I don't know if that's your solution. Those dogs do need to run and play, and you don't want a pile of gravel in the middle of the yard. Just my thoughts.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    If you dig out those areas a little bit, put down a vermiculite and peat moss mix, then use some time of durable athletic type grass seed mix, it should help to limit the problem. Also make sure that you thatch your lawn significantly in the spring, and early fall to prevent grass from matting up.
    If you want different results in your life, you need to do different things than you have done in the past. Change is that simple.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis
    If you dig out those areas a little bit, put down a vermiculite and peat moss mix, then use some time of durable athletic type grass seed mix, it should help to limit the problem. Also make sure that you thatch your lawn significantly in the spring, and early fall to prevent grass from matting up.
    This is in AZ, I hope they don't have grass.

    Edit: Oops! missed your above statement, Hab! Sorry Skis! (adjusts glasses)
    Last edited by boiker; 04 Jan 2005 at 6:08 PM.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Habanero's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by boiker
    This is in AZ, I hope they don't have grass.
    small amount for the pups, but otherwise we've got rock.

    My only other idea was the build this area back up and then extend the patio out with flagstone and eliminate the area. But, I am a little nervous thinking of dealing with concrete. It scares me.

    At least if we extended the patio they could run right out the back door and mess the yard up, they'd have to run around a little first.
    When Jesus said "love your enemies", he probably didn't mean kill them.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian boilerplater's avatar
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    Throw some gypsum in the lake? Might work a little. If you can give up on grass there alltogether, you could dump a load of organic mulch on it. That would also add organic matter to the soil as it breaks down and eventually yield better infiltration.

    You just don't picture Arizona as a place where people get standing water problems. Is this common?

  11. #11
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by boilerplater
    Throw some gypsum in the lake? Might work a little. If you can give up on grass there alltogether, you could dump a load of organic mulch on it. That would also add organic matter to the soil as it breaks down and eventually yield better infiltration.

    You just don't picture Arizona as a place where people get standing water problems. Is this common?
    Yes. Most Phoenix area slab construction doesn't pay alot of attention to site slopes and grading. Rough grading leaves alot of low areas in most subdivisions that love to puddle. Also this recent rain storm has dumped almost 2" in some areas. That is alot of water for the desert to absorb. The Sedona area has had some serious flooding and the oak creek canyon has collapsed and had mudslides in some areas.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian
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    Hmmm I'm no landscape architect but maybe you could use that erroded spot for something else, and try to grow grass somewhere else if possible; also if your pups are destructive to the lawn, you could make them a gravel patio in where they can be as desctructive as they wish. I've seen that solution several times in houses with lots of dogs.

    I hope I was helpful

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