Dateline: July 29, 2002

Planning in the Periodicals

A roundup of current online magazine articles that explore planning history and issues, sometimes with a global flavor:

-- Fast Company magazine --
The Italian village of Colletta di Castelbianco, dating back to the 13th century, was on the verge of extinction, says Fast Company magazine, until it got a new design and the Internet
helped bring it back to life. "Colletta's ancient dwellings were barely visible when land surveyor Alessandro Pampirio and two colleagues stumbled upon the village during a
Sunday stroll back in 1991," says the article, "La Dolce Vita, Internet Style." Today, underneath the village, "a 10-mile network of fiber optics and copper delivers a level of connectivity
that the largest Italian cities would envy. Each home in Colletta has an Internet line, an ISDN port that supports videophone and videoconferencing services, a radiophone for use
around the village, and cable for video-on-demand and interactive TV."

Read the article: http://www.fastcompany.com/online/61/italy.html


-- D-Lib Magazine --
From 1867 through 1970, writes the librarian-author, "the Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps documented the rise of American cities, and their block-by-block detail has assured their
popularity and importance to modern-day researchers. ... Aside from the intended audience of insurance companies, the maps have been of value to genealogists, demographers,
environmentalists, urban planners, historians, and laypersons, and it is no surprise that attempts have been made in recent years to digitize the maps." The article discusses
technical issues, copyright, and past abortive attempts to make the maps available digitally, and the portion of the collection made available online by the University of Utah.

Read the article: http://www.dlib.org/dlib/july02/arli...7arlitsch.html

See some maps already online: http://www.lib.utah.edu/digital/sanborn/


-- Smithsonian magazine --
The remains of human-fashioned pyramids in the Supe Valley of Peru suggest that civilization emerged in the Americas 1,000 years earlier than experts believed. The article says
compelling new evidence indicates that the six earth-and-rock mounds are "the remains of a city that flourished nearly 5,000 years ago. If true, it would be the oldest urban center in
the Americas and among the most ancient in all the world." Seven striking photographs of the site illustrate the brief article in Smithsonian's August issue.

Read the article: http://www.smithsonianmag.si.edu/smi...g02/caral.html

-- Metropolis Magazine --
Urbanist Michael Sorkin surveys the planned communities springing up in India, from a "spiritualist community" called Auroville to New Oroville, New Oroville, "a 500-acre 'branded
community offering a coveted international lifestyle.' New Oroville is ultimately to provide housing, production, community, and recreational facilities for 12,000 to 15,000 employees
and family members. The entire village is being constructed of spray-formed monolithic concrete domes. Organized as apartments, houses, and workspaces, each will include
abundant modern technology as well as a private back garden." In Auroville, things are different. The charter reads: "Auroville belongs to nobody in particular. Auroville belongs to
humanity as a whole. ... To live in Auroville, one must be a willing servitor of the Divine Consciousness."

Read the article: http://www.metropolismag.com/html/co...ind/index.html

Visit the Auroville website: http://www.auroville.org/

-- Inc magazine --
In "America's Favorite Hometown Businesses," Inc. magazine celebrates the "charming, idiosyncratic, and lovable" businesses that Main Street still has a monopoly on. From
Feathers, a bird shop in Marlborough, Massachusetts, to C.C. Filson luggage in Seattle, the short articles by writers, entertainers, and "influential people" are paeans to the
anti-Wal-Marts of Main Street, USA - some still kicking, others of blessed memory.

Read the article: http://www.inc.com/magazine/20020701/24375.html

Dateline is based on reports from Internet sources and public and private organizations. For more information, contact sources mentioned in the news item. If you have
suggestions or corrections for Dateline, contact Ralph Jassen at mailto:rjassen@planning.org or Cynthia Cheski at mailto:ccheski@planning.org.