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Thread: Favorite FICTION authors

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Favorite FICTION authors

    Name one or two off-beat authors that really float your boat.

    Tim Dorsey - Florida writer. Hero is Serge, a mentally-impaired serial killer who has wonderfully inventive ways of murdering idiots (like salting a guy and leaving him staked on a FL rooftop). A whole series of Serge books, each one better than the last.

    Anne George - deceased- Birmingham, Alabama writer. Hysterically funny series of mysteries involving two sisters.

    Hey, I've found that many of my favorite authors resulted from tips from friends. This is a good way to discover new authors.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
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    Since it's Fiction, it also involves, Science Fiction... So I have to say:
    -Neal Stephenson
    -William Gibson
    -Ray Bradbury
    -Isaac Asimov
    Now, plain ol' Fiction:
    -George Orwell
    -Dan Brown
    .... That's what comes to mind right now.
    Of course you can't tell I prefer sci-fi.

  3. #3
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
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    Hands down, Clive Cussler.

    Also enjoy Tom Clancy.
    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Quote Originally posted by NHPlanner
    Hands down, Clive Cussler.
    Also enjoy Tom Clancy.
    Ditto.
    Wished I kept copy of 1st printing of Hunt for Red October from Naval Institure Press, 1984.
    Oddball
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    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
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  5. #5
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    Here is my list.

    I own just about every book these authors have ever written and in some cases multiple copies.

    In no particular order

    Spider Robinson - met him, own a signed copy of one his books, stood in line for 2 hours to get it
    Phillip Jose Farmer - own signed copy of book
    Kurt Vonnegut - own signed silk screen of his
    Tom Wolfe - signed copy, saw a reading
    Robert Heinlein - Trying to get a signed copy of his work, but they cost $$$
    Frederick Pohl
    Tom Robbins
    Douglas Coupland - missed his reading this week as I was at an MBA presentation, d'oh
    Hunter S Thompson - maybe fictional, maybe not.
    Mordecai Richler
    Phillip K. Dick
    Maurice Sendak

    Graphic Novels

    Will Eisner - RIP
    Art Spiegelman
    Peter Bagge - own a page
    Bob Fingerman - own a page
    Dave Sim - custom art work /signed copy
    Adrian Tomine
    Daniel Clowes
    Frank Miller

    There are probbaly more in each category, but can't think of them right now
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  6. #6
    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
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    Off-beat fiction? Charles Darwin comes to mind. (It's a Kansas and Georgia thing.)

  7. #7
    Alice Munro, Richard Ford, Jorge Luis Borges. Munro can be offbeat, with short stories that take place in different decades or even centuries, but her writing is very crisp and controlled, almost like Henry James or Jane Austen. Ford is more straightforward but a fantastic storyteller, and Borges is, well, wondrous. No one like him, although Calvino is similar in a lot of ways.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    Mark Twain is numero uno in my book(s). Larry McMurtry spins a good yarn. John Irving. Herman Wouk, too. Harper Lee, though she wrote just that one extraordinary book (To Kill A Mockingbird).
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally posted by SkeLeton
    Since it's Fiction, it also involves, Science Fiction... So I have to say:
    -Neal Stephenson
    -William Gibson
    -Ray Bradbury
    -Isaac Asimov
    Now, plain ol' Fiction:
    -George Orwell
    -Dan Brown
    .... That's what comes to mind right now.
    Of course you can't tell I prefer sci-fi.
    Dittos on William Gibson. I loved Pattern Recognition (see the books thread). I also enjoyed Snowcrash but have not yet gotten up the nerve to tackle Neal Stephenson's gigantic new, intimidating trilogy. (I don't really enjoy his libertarian world view very much).

    Some of my other favorites:

    A problematical writer, but China Mieville has created an awesome, spectacular "steampunk" (cyberpunk with steam technology, biological manipulation, and "magic" in his New Crobruzon trilogy. Perdido Street Station is a great read for city planners, despite its manifest flaws in plotting and structure. Warning: he is a bit of a Marxist (Economics PhD), so the glories of the working class and the perfideous doings of Capitalists are a big part of his world view.

    James Lee Burke: Lyrical, fantastic detective stories set in Louisiana's Cajun Country. He also has written a few set in his other home, Montana. Southerners: you gotta read In the Electric Mists with Confederate Ghosts. Transcends the limitations of the genre!

    Ian Rankin: fantastic police procedurals set in Edinburgh, Scotland. Quite gloomy, but quite excellent!

    Stephen King I really enjoyed the Dark Tower series.

    Carl Hiaasen (not sure of the spelling) hillarious send-ups of Florida development politics. I even enjoyed his little environmental fable for youth, Hoot

    Loren D. Estleman's Amos Walker private eye novels. Awesome hardboiled tough guy series set in Detroit.

    Brian Stableford: The Werewolves of London trilogy was a fantastic scenario about the nature of reality and morality-the protagonist beings. a race of creatures existing somehow in the spaces between reality-were a fascinating creation.

    Edit: Reading donk's list, I have to add Philip K. Dick to my list, too.

  10. #10
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by mike gurnee
    Off-beat fiction? Charles Darwin comes to mind. (It's a Kansas and Georgia thing.)
    Or how about Matthew, Mark, Luke and John; great fiction writers each of them....it's a Darwin thing.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Coragus's avatar
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    BKM - Dead on target on the Dark Tower series. Man, those 7 books have affected me so much that I've redefined aspects of my spirituality because of them.

    Other than that, I have two authors to mention. I don't read much fiction, so my choices are limited.

    Marion Zimmer Bradley - I have only read Mist of Avalon, but that alone is enough to put her in my fiction Hall of Fame.

    Timothy Zahn - He wrote the only (for my money) good Star Wars-related books, which were his Heir to the Empire trilogy.
    Back home just in time for hockey season!

  12. #12
    Cyburbian Trail Nazi's avatar
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    I really like Diana Gabaldon (the Outlander series), Charlaine Harris (the Southern Vampire series), and Karen Marie Moning (the Highlander series). I also like Tom Clancy, John Grisham, and Robert Ludlum.

  13. #13
    Cyburbian ludes98's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Coragus
    Timothy Zahn - He wrote the only (for my money) good Star Wars-related books, which were his Heir to the Empire trilogy.
    His second trilogy (Hand of Thrawn) was disappointing to me. Did you read the Han Solo Trilogy? AC Crispin did a nice job.

    I have been reading George RR Martin's Fire and Ice series. It is phenomenal. I donít like waiting years between books, but they are all 900 pages and worth the wait.

    I like Lincoln Child and Douglas Preston.. They did The Relic, good book craptastic movie. Reliquary was ok as a follow-up, but not great. Mount Dragon was another good book they did.

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Budgie's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by SkeLeton
    -Ray Bradbury
    -Isaac Asimov
    Yes
    Yes
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    George Elliot
    Anthony Burgess
    Leo Tolstoy
    John Steinbeck
    "And all this terrible change had come about because he had ceased to believe himself and had taken to believing others. " - Leo Tolstoy

  15. #15
    Cyburbian dobopoq's avatar
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    Fyodor Dostoevsky
    Jack Kerouac
    Albert Camus
    "The current American way of life is founded not just on motor transportation but on the religion of the motorcar, and the sacrifices that people are prepared to make for this religion stand outside the realm of rational criticism." -Lewis Mumford

  16. #16
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    John D. Voelker (aka Robert Traver)
    Dan Brown
    Hemmingway

    That is the short list.
    Invest in the things today, that provide the returns tomorrow.

  17. #17

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    Can I throw in the following as well:

    Glen Cook-I'm really enjoying the Black Company series. A band of mercenaries holding together despite all the odds! Not deep or profound, really, but very "human."

    Peter Straub-His lost boy...lost girl duo was quite interesting. Especially the latest book, whose title escapes me. Hard to describe, but superb horror fiction.

    Editing my previous thread: I am softening to the libertarian world view, especially as we are bombarded with messages to unthinkingly OBEY!

  18. #18
    Cyburbian Greenescapist's avatar
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    I like John Steinbeck, Vladimir Nabokov, Paul Bowles, Garcia Marquez, Dostoyevsky- the psychological novel type of thing. I've always found that I enjoy individual books better than an author's whole work. I am not motivated to read all of Orwell's work just because I loved 1984, for whatever reason.

  19. #19
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Nevada Barr for her Anna Pigeon series
    http://www.nevadabarr.com/
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  20. #20

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    Am a big fan of Iain Banks books' - he writes Iain Banks for contemporary fiction, and Iain M Banks for Science Fiction.

    I'm not normally a massive sci-fi fan, but I enjoy his ones a lot. My favourite contemporary title of his is 'Complicity'.

    Also regularly enjoy Ian Rankin books. They're based around the Detective Rebus, who is a bit of an anti-hero. All set in the darker side of Edinburgh - highly recommended.

  21. #21
    Cyburbian nerudite's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Greenescapist
    I like John Steinbeck, Vladimir Nabokov, Paul Bowles, Garcia Marquez, Dostoyevsky- the psychological novel type of thing.
    Very similar with me, even like the same authors.

    I'll add: Naguib Mahfouz, Thomas Wolfe, Faulkner, Kerouac

  22. #22
    Cyburbian Plus Whose Yur Planner's avatar
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    Regular Fiction-Clive Cussler, Nevada Barr
    Sci-Fi-Larry Niven-known space series as well as Ringworld Trilogy
    Douglas Adams-Hitchhiker's series

  23. #23
    Cyburbian Plus Salmissra's avatar
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    I'd add Judith Tarr (but not her White Horse series). I really like her historical fiction, and her science fiction ain't too shabby, either.
    David Eddings (and his wife Leigh) for the Belgariad and Malloeran series. The new series - The Dreamers - only has the first 2 books out now.
    Ed McBain (the old 87th Precinct novels) were my first adult (ie non Nancy Drew/Hardy Boys, non Agatha Christie) mysteries.

    I'm trying to remember the author of a series that my sister introduced me to. I think her name is Candace Robb. It's the Owen Archer mystery series - set in England.

    That's all that pops into my head right now.
    "We do not need any other Tutankhamun's tomb with all its treasures. We need context. We need understanding. We need knowledge of historical events to tie them together. We don't know much. Of course we know a lot, but it is context that's missing, not treasures." - Werner Herzog, in Archaeology, March/April 2011

  24. #24

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    Quote Originally posted by noj

    Also regularly enjoy Ian Rankin books. They're based around the Detective Rebus, who is a bit of an anti-hero. All set in the darker side of Edinburgh - highly recommended.
    Excellent.

  25. #25
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by JNA
    Nevada Barr for her Anna Pigeon series
    http://www.nevadabarr.com/
    Yep, and along those same lines Marcia Muller, Elizabeth George, P.D. James, J.A. Jance, Sue Grafton, Janet Evanovich, and Sara Paretsky

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