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Thread: Urban design at University of Maryland

  1. #1

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    Urban design at University of Maryland

    Hello,

    I am hoping to go back to graduate school in the fall of 2006 for my MUP. I am most interested in schools that are design oriented, rather than policy oriented. I live in the Washington, D.C. area and would like to stay in the area. Since the closest school is the University of Maryland, I would love to hear what people think of the program. After searching through some of the old threads, Maryland is not a program that seems to be discussed a lot. Maryland does have a concentration in Urban Design, and the Planning school is located in the school of architecture, but would any of you recommend Maryland as a school to study Urban Design at? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member JLA's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maryt44
    Hello,

    I am hoping to go back to graduate school in the fall of 2006 for my MUP. I am most interested in schools that are design oriented, rather than policy oriented. I live in the Washington, D.C. area and would like to stay in the area. Since the closest school is the University of Maryland, I would love to hear what people think of the program. After searching through some of the old threads, Maryland is not a program that seems to be discussed a lot. Maryland does have a concentration in Urban Design, and the Planning school is located in the school of architecture, but would any of you recommend Maryland as a school to study Urban Design at? Thanks.
    Another option in the DC area:

    http://www.waac.vt.edu/

    http://www.nvc.vt.edu/uap/index.asp

  3. #3
         
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    DC area urban design programs

    I thought urban design was restricted to the architecture students at Maryland, but I could be wrong. I know the architecture program at Maryland is behind the times, but the school just got a new dean and the program should only improve.

    UPenn, a couple hours from DC, has an interdisciplinary urban design program. UVA has an urbanism certificate program.

  4. #4

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    University of Maryland

    Quote Originally posted by rmulrew
    I thought urban design was restricted to the architecture students at Maryland, but I could be wrong. I know the architecture program at Maryland is behind the times, but the school just got a new dean and the program should only improve.

    UPenn, a couple hours from DC, has an interdisciplinary urban design program. UVA has an urbanism certificate program.

    Thanks. Planning students can concentrate in Urban Design at Maryland. UVA requires 2 years experience working in a field related to the planning, development, conservation and renewal of the city. Also, UVA doesn't look like a design heavy school.

    Maryland looked like a good option because I could get in state tuition. I'm starting not feeling too confident about Maryland's program however. It just seems that no one on this site has gone there or thinks that highly of the program. UPenn would be a great scool and I will definitely apply, but one thing I have noticed when reading previous postings is not to get too far into debt for graduate school. However, since I have no background in Planning, BA from Syracuse in Political Science and History, I would realy like to go to the school where I can learn the most.

    Thanks for your help and if anyone has any other opinion on the University of Maryland or any other design oreiented school on the east coast, it would be greatly appreciated.

  5. #5
         
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    Someone recently told me you only live once, so apply to the school/program you feel you can get the most out of. Check out MIT's website. They have a design oriented planning program. If you're willing to go into alot of debt, check out the GSD (Harvard)--the most design oriented planning program. If you're curious, the studio work is on the website. Georgia Tech has an urban design concentration, but I don't know much about it. Tech has a good work-study program and excellent job placement. They usually have a spring open house, which you might want to attend. If you're willing to move to California, Berkeley is a good choice.
    Many schools offer a Master of Urban Desingn (MUD, MAUD, etc.) only as a post-professional degree, which I don't think you want. And some schools like the GSD require a degree in architecture or landscape architecture for the MAUD.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally posted by rmulrew
    Someone recently told me you only live once, so apply to the school/program you feel you can get the most out of. Check out MIT's website. They have a design oriented planning program. If you're willing to go into alot of debt, check out the GSD (Harvard)--the most design oriented planning program. If you're curious, the studio work is on the website. Georgia Tech has an urban design concentration, but I don't know much about it. Tech has a good work-study program and excellent job placement. They usually have a spring open house, which you might want to attend. If you're willing to move to California, Berkeley is a good choice.
    Many schools offer a Master of Urban Desingn (MUD, MAUD, etc.) only as a post-professional degree, which I don't think you want. And some schools like the GSD require a degree in architecture or landscape architecture for the MAUD.

    Thanks again. I will definitely look into all of those programs. I've noticed that a lot of the Ivy league programs are design-oriented. If I do go to a school out of the DC area, how hard would it be to get a job in the DC area after I graduate. Do you feel it is important to go to school where you want to work? I know it helps, but is it absolutely necessary? Also, do you know if Cornell's program is design oriented? I'm orginally from the Syracuse area so I wouldn't mind going close to home. I'm not even totally sure I could get in but I would be willing to try. Thanks.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
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    They have a certificate in Urban Design.

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