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Thread: East coast schools vs. west coast schools?

  1. #1

    East coast schools vs. west coast schools?

    Another undergrad question,

    I'm interested in planning with a concentration in land use policy. So far I have a list of five grad schools I'll probably apply to for summer/fall 2006 admissions. One of them is on the west coast... in LA.

    Are there major differences in the curriculum of a east coast school vs. a west coast school... considering my concentration is land use policy?

    My psychology is 'old urbanism,' and I'll definetly pursue a career on the east coast or an rust belt city. What I'm worried about is having an emphasis on California style developments [cough]sprawl[/cough] and little to nothing on urban infill and urban issues.

    Are my concerns legitiment?

    USC's dual Real Estate/Planning
    http://www.usc.edu/schools/sppd/prog.../mpl_mred.html

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Greenescapist's avatar
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    If you want to work on the East Coast, then why not go to school out there, too. The alumni network can always help with finding a job. Unless you get money or something go to school near where you'd like to work if you know that already.



    Quote Originally posted by OfficialPlanner
    Another undergrad question,

    I'm interested in planning with a concentration in land use policy. So far I have a list of five grad schools I'll probably apply to for summer/fall 2006 admissions. One of them is on the west coast... in LA.

    Are there major differences in the curriculum of a east coast school vs. a west coast school... considering my concentration is land use policy?

    My psychology is 'old urbanism,' and I'll definetly pursue a career on the east coast or an rust belt city. What I'm worried about is having an emphasis on California style developments [cough]sprawl[/cough] and little to nothing on urban infill and urban issues.

    Are my concerns legitiment?

    USC's dual Real Estate/Planning
    http://www.usc.edu/schools/sppd/prog.../mpl_mred.html

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Future Planner's avatar
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    Jan 2005
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    On the edge
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    Quote Originally posted by OfficialPlanner
    What I'm worried about is having an emphasis on California style developments [cough]sprawl[/cough] and little to nothing on urban infill and urban issues.
    Although we are a long way from perfection, many California laws are being rewritten to discourage sprawl, we just haven't seen results on a wide-spread scale yet. On the state level, there are at least 5 laws pertaining to smart growth with varying objectives that were introduced into the state Assembly for the 2005-2006 session. Adding to the smart growth laws in place (Govt Code 65041 as one example).
    On the local level, San Diego has done much to discourage sprawl. We have mixed-use overlay zones, and the General Plan is being rewritten to encourage "Villages" (infill development) instead of sprawling onto our remaining vacant lands. This is also the intent of the County of San Diego. San Diego also has Transit First! initiatives as well as transit oriented guidelines (TOD), established in 1994.
    So, along with a few other states perhaps Maryland, I think California will take the lead in sustainable development in the coming decades.
    Hope this helps with your decison
    Of course, this is my bias as an optimistic and idealistic graduate student!

  4. #4
    It does, thanks. What really attracted me to USC is the dual Real Estate + Planning program which can be completed in two years. That's not too bad, and its Real Estate development program is supposedly among the Top 5 in the nation, definetly one to apply for.

    The others I'm considering are MIT, Columbia, Florida State, Wagner, or Hunter.

    I'd be very pleased if I can get into any of the above. USC was the only one I was not too sure about given its west coast prespective.

  5. #5
    If you want to work on the East Coast, then why not go to school out there, too. The alumni network can always help with finding a job. Unless you get money or something go to school near where you'd like to work if you know that already.
    Thanks for the tip. I do appreciate all the insight I get from all in the Student Lounge.

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