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Thread: Best schools for new urbanism?

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    Best schools for new urbanism?

    this is a very informative forum and I have thouroughly enjoyed reading of your diverse experiences. What would you say are the best schools for new urbanist/smart growth internhships|education?

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    Quote Originally posted by afcunningham33
    this is a very informative forum and I have thouroughly enjoyed reading of your diverse experiences. What would you say are the best schools for new urbanist/smart growth internhships|education?
    Rutgers announces on their website that they teach Urban Design using the principles of New Urbanism

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    Asolutely. A difficulty with Rutgers is that it is on the edge of the "orange blob" of NYC. I'd like a school more smackdab in the middle of a city and its opportunities.

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    Quote Originally posted by afcunningham33
    Asolutely. A difficulty with Rutgers is that it is on the edge of the "orange blob" of NYC. I'd like a school more smackdab in the middle of a city and its opportunities.
    I live right outside New Brunswick and plan on attending Rutgers for graduate school, not because I could live at home and save a fortune but because my fascination with the revitalization of New Brunswick had probably the biggest impact on my deciding to study urban planning. New Brunswick is probably one of the best places to study urban planning due to the amount of new investment going into the city - i'm talking billions of dollars. There are probably five or six major construction projects going on right now - from a hotel/convention center to a new police station for Rutgers. Plus, it is only 45 minutes on the train to New York (a new train station is being built too)

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    rutgers

    Quote Originally posted by afcunningham33
    Asolutely. A difficulty with Rutgers is that it is on the edge of the "orange blob" of NYC. I'd like a school more smackdab in the middle of a city and its opportunities.
    rutgers yes is in metropolitan nyc, but new brunswick is a diverse, vibrant, dense small city. plus, jersey has a lot of transit-oriented development projects around some of their rail station towns which could be models for the future for infill, regional, and smart growth. i'm not sure at all how strong their UP program gets you into new urbanist stuff, theoretically or in practice in jersey.

    i would assume berkeley is the strongest for professors with interests and courses that talk about or put new urbanism into practice (since that's where the concept of new urbanism began?).

    i feel the same way though - need to be in a large city for grad school.

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    Virginia Tech's Alexandria annex has a strong planning program. Peter Katz is on the faculty and teaches courses in New Urbanism and Form Based Codes. The campus is in the middle of Alexandria's Old Town section, and also houses architecture and landscape design programs.

    http://www.nvc.vt.edu/uap/index.asp

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    Quote Originally posted by bross
    I live right outside New Brunswick and plan on attending Rutgers for graduate school, not because I could live at home and save a fortune but because my fascination with the revitalization of New Brunswick had probably the biggest impact on my deciding to study urban planning. New Brunswick is probably one of the best places to study urban planning due to the amount of new investment going into the city - i'm talking billions of dollars. There are probably five or six major construction projects going on right now - from a hotel/convention center to a new police station for Rutgers. Plus, it is only 45 minutes on the train to New York (a new train station is being built too)
    Thanks! I've heard great things about NJ Transit. I got into Rutgers, so it is on the table. They have done powerful studies there on the costs of sprawl. I may look at them with new eyes.

    How tied into the New /york metro area are they, and how much of an edge city is New Brunswick becoming?

    Quote Originally posted by LPA
    Virginia Tech's Alexandria annex has a strong planning program. Peter Katz is on the faculty and teaches courses in New Urbanism and Form Based Codes. The campus is in the middle of Alexandria's Old Town section, and also houses architecture and landscape design programs.

    http://www.nvc.vt.edu/uap/index.asp
    Plus they've got the Lang.

    Still waiting to hear from them. Would you say that you could get a self contained education in planning there, or are trips to Blacksburg required?

    I'm about to read Katz's book in this next round of library books. Exciting.
    Last edited by NHPlanner; 31 Jul 2006 at 2:13 PM.

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    Quote Originally posted by afcunningham33
    Plus they've got the Lang.

    Still waiting to hear from them. [RED]Would you say that you could get a self contained education in planning there, or are trips to Blacksburg required?[/RED]

    I'm about to read Katz's book in this next round of library books. Exciting.
    Trips to Blacksburg are available but not required. Intermittently, a class will be taught in part (never in whole) by teleconference from the mother ship, but between Lang and Chris Nelson we've got stronger faculty up here anyway.

    Nelson's quite the innovator as far as curriculum goes, and there are a lot of resources available for those who take advantage. One of the best features of the campus is the GIS lab, which was just upgraded to ArcGIS 9, and comes with very complete data layers for some local jurisdictions. There are also good research opportunities with the Metropolitan Institute, and some top-tier planning and research firms in the area to intern with. Also, very little politics in the classroom, which is a good and useful thing.

    Downside (my opinion): faculty is top quality, but small and has some outside commitments, while the student body is growing fast. They're properly focused on maintaining and expanding course offerings (and the offerings are very good!), but some housekeeping-type stuff falls through the cracks. For example, nobody really has time for student advising. It's a fine environment for someone who charts their own course and takes advantage of the resources that are made available, but rough for those who need a lot of handholding.

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    Quote Originally posted by LPA
    Trips to Blacksburg are available but not required. Intermittently, a class will be taught in part (never in whole) by teleconference from the mother ship, but between Lang and Chris Nelson we've got stronger faculty up here anyway.

    Nelson's quite the innovator as far as curriculum goes, and there are a lot of resources available for those who take advantage. One of the best features of the campus is the GIS lab, which was just upgraded to ArcGIS 9, and comes with very complete data layers for some local jurisdictions. There are also good research opportunities with the Metropolitan Institute, and some top-tier planning and research firms in the area to intern with. Also, very little politics in the classroom, which is a good and useful thing.

    Downside (my opinion): faculty is top quality, but small and has some outside commitments, while the student body is growing fast. They're properly focused on maintaining and expanding course offerings (and the offerings are very good!), but some housekeeping-type stuff falls through the cracks. For example, nobody really has time for student advising. It's a fine environment for someone who charts their own course and takes advantage of the resources that are made available, but rough for those who need a lot of handholding.
    How is ther relationnship with local gov'ts, design agencies (louis Berger, RTKL etc.) and places like ULI, CFTE, or APTA? I've talked with people at these place and really liked what they had going.

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    Quote Originally posted by afcunningham33
    How is ther relationnship with local gov'ts, design agencies (louis Berger, RTKL etc.) and places like ULI, CFTE, or APTA? I've talked with people at these place and really liked what they had going.
    Don't really know the inside details, but the faculty (esp. Lang) know or have worked with people at many of those places, including all the big name thinktanks. There's also a lot of consulting, expert witnessing etc. going on, so my impression is that they're all very widely connected and aware of what's going on out in the world.

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    Quote Originally posted by afcunningham33
    Thanks! I've heard great things about NJ Transit. I got into Rutgers, so it is on the table. They have done powerful studies there on the costs of sprawl. I may look at them with new eyes.

    How tied into the New /york metro area are they, and how much of an edge city is New Brunswick becoming?
    They are very tied into the New York Metro area. New Brunswick is right off the turnpike, so without traffic you could get to New York in probably 35 minutes and see the skyline in about 15. In fact, many people live in New Brunswick and take the train to Manhattan for work. Although New Jersey is trying hard to develop an identity of its own away from New York City, they are realizing that its better to try and lure those in the city to the other side of the river, as seen with Hoboken, Jersey City and Newark. New Brunswick is no exception.

    I'd say New Brunswick has edge city characteristics but I wouldn't class it as such. In fact, New brunswick is trying heavily to attract the yuppie crowd and have built and continue to build high-end townhouses and apartment buildings which has led to an increase in upscale restaurants, cafes, clubs, etc. New Brunswick is also finally bringing students downtown with the construction of new dorms on the main artery in the city.

    All I can say is that New Brunswick, which used to be notorious for crime is transforming with the help of Johnson and Johnson, Rutgers, and UMDNJ. Also a few years ago Bloustein School of Planning and policy moved into a $42 million dollar building, so the program is defiantely on the rise.

    Check out www.devco.org for more on New Brunswick redevelopment.

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