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Thread: Planning in a resort/ski town: affordability

  1. #1
    Cyburbian plankton's avatar
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    Planning in a resort/ski town: affordability

    I was going to revitalize a previous thread on this general topic (started by michaelski last year), but I have a slightly different question to pose to the group......

    I have a strong interest in planning in a ski/resort town located west of the Rockies. I realize the "planning in a fishbowl" syndrome and other issues that make planning in these areas especially challenging/frustrating, but here's the crux of the matter:

    How would I afford to live there?

    I'm curious of your thoughts on the matter. How would one pull it off? I am married with two young children (2-1/2 yrs. & 6 weeks) and am absolutely giddy about the idea of raising my children in the likes of Ketchum, Jackson, Steamboat, etc.. but am not desirous of living in a rented one bedroom condo.

    Any western mountain cities/towns come to mind that you think are (relatively) affordable and meccas of outdoor recreation......?? Any other thoughts or comments.....??

  2. #2

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    Without incredible luck, this is a two-income, the kids are in day care proposition you are talking about, so think about that first. Your spouse probably has to be able to earn as much as you do, preferably more. If you can live with that, then:

    I am presuming you are not thinking about doing this with a long commute each way (Twin Falls to Ketchum, for example, or Glenwood to Aspen). That clearly is one option, but I will not pursue it in these comments.

    One possibility is to have a skill set strong enough to work for one of the firms, like Design Workshop, that have offices in resort communities. I think you have to have design skills to pull this off, or perhaps very advanced computer skills. Also a lot of luck.

    A second possibility is to be able to compete for a director's job in one of the major resort communities, where such a job carries a high salary. Needless to say, such jobs do not come up very often (and they can be quite stressful).

    If you are in the public sector, some places are less expensive than others, but they tend to be small places and thus have either no or very few planners, who are not necessarily well paid. You could find the lifestyle you seek in Red Lodge, for example, but there is only a part-time job to pursue.

    Overall, it may be difficult to do this without a period of time in a condo, or of a long commute.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian plankton's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Lee Nellis
    Without incredible luck, this is a two-income, the kids are in day care proposition you are talking about, so think about that first. Your spouse probably has to be able to earn as much as you do, preferably more. I am presuming you are not thinking about doing this with a long commute each way (Twin Falls to Ketchum, for example, or Glenwood to Aspen). That clearly is one option, but I will not pursue it in these comments. Overall, it may be difficult to do this without a period of time in a condo, or of a long commute.
    Pretty much sums up my thoughts -- not real intersted in living in Twin or Glenwood or Pinedale, etc. and communting to phat city. I wanna be able to live there (or closeby) if I'm gonna work there. My wife has potential to make some decent clams (she has in the past) but we have some child raising to do first. So, with lots of tradeoffs that make the proposition seem difficult, at best, to pull off with reasonable success and sanity, I am feeling pretty content where I am (for at least the rest of week.... )

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    A few years ago, they built one of those 'dream homes' in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. If I had won, I couldn't have paid the taxes on it and had no desire to move there. Most of the time, when someone wins a house, they sell it, pay the taxes, and pocket the rest. Maybe you could make it your mission to enter every contest you run across which is giving away a house. If you win and the house is in the right place, try to get a job there. If not, sell it.

    Somebody has to win such things. No, it isn't something you can "plan" on and you should still look at other solutions if you seriously want to live in a place like that, someday. But it doesn't hurt to keep dreaming -- to have your head in the clouds -- as long as you also keep your feet planted firmly on the ground.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
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    It was quite a few years ago, but I remember a planning ad for a ski resort. Something to the effect: "must have independent means to live in a high income resort community."

  6. #6
    Cyburbian plankton's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by mike gurnee
    It was quite a few years ago, but I remember a planning ad for a ski resort. Something to the effect: "must have independent means to live in a high income resort community."
    Bring your own VW Bus, perhaps.....

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Off Width's avatar
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    I guess it depends on your def of ski town..

    I recently saw an ad for a planner in Durango, CO. Not inexpensive but not yet Vail, or Telluride either...

    Plankton..check your private messages for an email from me - I'd like to talk off the board...
    NATURE WASTES SPACE
    PAVEMENT IS OUR SALVATION


    Zeroxed signs found along Pacific Coast Highway in 1990. Proudly hanging in my office ever since... ;)

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    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Quick! Look at the web site for Nederland, Colorado. They are hiring a planning director in this small town twenty minutes from Boulder and ten minutes from the Eldora ski slopes. The town is one of those places on the verge of being discovered, and could be a great place to work. The application deadline is the end of the month, though.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Off Width's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Cardinal
    Quick! Look at the web site for Nederland, Colorado. They are hiring a planning director in this small town twenty minutes from Boulder and ten minutes from the Eldora ski slopes. The town is one of those places on the verge of being discovered, and could be a great place to work. The application deadline is the end of the month, though.
    And Nederland is home to the "Frozen Dead Guy Day" celebration!

    Frozen Dead Guy
    Frequently Asked Questions

    Who is Grandpa Bredo?
    Bredo Morstoel (pronounced “Bread-dough More-stul”) was a Director of Parks and Recreation in Baerum County, Norway for over 30 years. He was born in Isfjorden, Romstel in western Norway on February 28, 1900. His marriage to Anna in the 1920’s created a family with two children. After his retirement in 1967, Bredo enjoyed his hobbies of painting, fishing, cross-country skiing, and hiking in the mountains. His daughter Aud rescued him with CPR after a heart attack in 1975, but he eventually died of heart failure during a nap at the family’s mountain retreat in Norway on November 6, 1989.

    Is he really dead?
    Yes. His heart stopped. He was deceased long before he was frozen for cryonic storage.

    Who froze him and why?
    Bredo’s grandson Trygve Bauge believes in cryonics. This is the science of using ultra-cold temperatures to preserve human life. It is a speculative technology that presumes medicine will someday be able to cure the disease that caused the death of the person who was frozen. At this time, technology and medicine have not advanced to the stage of determining how to reanimate the frozen bodies or how to heal them.

    How was he frozen?
    Grandpa was originally packed in dry ice at an undertaker’s in Norway, then shipped to the Trans Time facility in Oakland, California, where he moved from dry ice to the superior liquid nitrogen for nearly four years. He now rests in his original steel coffin, which is packed tightly in dry ice in an insulated wooden box stored in a Tuff Shed above Nederland, Colorado.

    Did Grandpa Bredo want this?
    No one knows. He died before Trygve could discuss it with him. Both Trygve and his mother, Grandpa Bredo’s daughter Aud, plan to be placed in cryonic suspension after their deaths.

    Who takes care of him?
    “The Ice Man” is Bo Shaffer of Delta Technogroup, Inc. He has been packing Bredo in dry ice since 1995. Every 4-5 weeks, Bo drives to Denver and hauls nearly a ton of dry ice up to the shed in Nederland. He takes his responsibility very seriously. Even though Grandpa was once dead, he is now considered to be in suspended animation, giving him the possibility that he may someday live again. This places The Ice Man in the precarious position of protecting Bredo’s opportunity for reanimation.

    Who pays for this?
    Bredo’s daughter Aud Morstoel and grandson Trygve Bauge have invested significant sums to maintain Grandpa. They are grateful for the donated Tuff Shed set up by volunteers in 1995 in response to publicity from FOX Radio and for other volunteer work provided by individuals locally. The ice and its delivery cost them over $700 a month. This is in addition to maintaining the property, the shed, and the accompanying disaster-proof house with their magnificent views of the Continental Divide.

    How long has he been here?
    Grandpa Bredo moved to Nederland from a cryonics facility in California in December, 1993.

    Isn’t that illegal?
    When Town officials learned of the situation in 1994, they passed an emergency ordinance to make it illegal to keep dead human or animal bodies or parts on one’s property. Laws can’t be passed after the fact, so Bredo was “grandfathered” in.

    Why is Grandpa in Nederland?
    His grandson Trygve lived in Boulder since 1980 and his family had driven through Nederland (with Grandpa) in 1982. Trygve and his mother Aud bought the property in Nederland in the early 1990’s with a vision to build a cryonics facility to serve numerous clients. Shortly after moving Grandpa to the metal shed (the first phase of what was to be a multi-unit underground facility) in December of 1993, Trygve was deported back to Norway due to an expired visa and his mother Aud was evicted from the house which had no plumbing or electricity. Also on an expired visa, Aud returned to her homeland, leaving Grandpa in the shed.

    Why is there a Frozen Dead Guy Days® Festival?
    The Town of Nederland was swarmed with international attention when the news of Grandpa was first revealed in 1994. News media from around the world descended on the tiny town to follow the unfolding story of how the Grandpa situation would be resolved. It put Nederland on the map. The flurry of activity subsided, and eight years later, in 2002, the Nederland Area Chamber of Commerce decided it was time to reanimate the story of Grandpa and help its downtown enjoy a lively weekend in the quiet months of winter. Grandson Trygve calls it “Cryonics’ First Mardi Gras”. The international attention has resumed as major media from around the world cover this unique winter festival each year.
    NATURE WASTES SPACE
    PAVEMENT IS OUR SALVATION


    Zeroxed signs found along Pacific Coast Highway in 1990. Proudly hanging in my office ever since... ;)

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