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Thread: Louisville's Lost City of Portland (Broadband Recommended)

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    Louisville's Lost City of Portland (Broadband Recommended)

    Perhaps not really lost, but never a city....maybe "aborted city of Portland"...

    Robin Garr, host of the LouisvilleTown website, says:

    "If history had broken in just a slightly different way some 150 years ago, it's entirely possible that Louisville and Portland, Ky., could have grown into Twin Cities at the Falls of the Ohio.

    And if they had, it's entirely reasonable to assume that Portland would have become the brawling, boisterous and blue-collar sibling, very much like St. Paul to Louisville's Minneapolis or Tampa to its St. Pete."


    ..or, more likely, Salford to Louisville's Manchester.

    Portland is one of Louisvilles more unusual neighborhoods, due to its history, street plan, and even architecture.* But first, as backrounder, some geography.

    The Ohio River at Louisville gets a bit complicated, pooling, then twisting and bending itself over the "Falls of the Ohio", really a series of whitewater rapids, made even more complex by exposed rock faces at low water and islands up & downstream.



    ..and a 1766 map, made by a British expedition down the Ohio.* Probably the earliest rendition.



    ...one could shoot the rapids via three "chutes" at high water..the "Indiana Chute", "Kentucky Chute", & "Middle Shoot" , with the Indiana Chute being the most favored..the width of passages through the rocks* here was the governing width for flatboats on the river.* A special kind of river pilot, the "falls pilot" was used to navigate the rapids during steamboat days.* Yet, at low water, one had to portage, either on the Indiana or Ohio side.*

    Eventually settlement began.* First, Louisville, and forts on both sides of the river, as per this 1790s map:



    ...and, soon, other settlements, to take advantage of this break in river navigation.* Portland and Shippingport were the two Kentucky settlements that arose as ports for downriver shipping and cartage around the Falls.



    Shippingport was founded by a French settler, James Berthoud, and Portland by William Lytle.* I'm not sure if this was the same William Lytle who figured in early Cincinnati history.* There is some evidence that Lytle did have a canal around the falls in mind when he chose his town site.* The town included "Portland Proper", and a string of outlots following the portage road to Louisville (later turned into a plank road/turnpike in 1818)

    In any case, the both settlements had close trade ties with New Orleans and the French community there, and drew French settlers, including John James Audubon, famous for his bird paintings, but also, locally doing portature, such as this one of Marie Berthoud, wife of the founder of Shippingport:



    So, Portland and Shippingport developed as competing towns to Louisville.* Louisville, however, had the advantage of a better harbor on the river, and also an earlier start.* William Lytle ran into financial difficulties and his properites taken by the Bank of the United States, who subdivided the outlots (hence the local street name "Bank Street")..subdivided in time to recieve the wave of Irish immigrants that hit Louisville.* Then a canal was built around the falls on the Kentucky side, the Louisville & Portland Canal, in 1830, with locks at Shippingport.*

    The canal was built to 1820s era steamship sizes, and was obsolete by the 1850s, so there was still some demand for "forwarding & commission buisness" around the Falls, which was met by the construction of a railroad from the Portland wharf to Louisville in 1838.* The big potential boost to Portlands fortunes was inland railroad connections, as railroad terminus for Lexington.* Lexington had proposed to build a railroad to the Ohio, and wanted that railroad to terminate in Portland, bipassing rival Louisville.* If this strategy had worked Portland may have developed into the "twin city" of Louisville.* Instead, the Lexington railroad terminated at Louisville, which did become the "big city" at the Falls of the Ohio, the "Falls City".* Portland ended up annexed to Louisville in the 1850s, though it has retained a seperate identity to this day.

    Portland in the 1850s...the wharf along the Ohio, Shippingport, the canal, and the developement along the turnpike to Louisville are all visible, as is the railroad.



    A 1850s view towards Portland and Sand Island from Indiana:



    And a late 1850s map, showing how Louisville in relation to Portland. By this time the L&N railroad had been built, which really was the economic driver for Louisville after the decline of steamboat traffic



    The Louisville & Portland canal was enlarged in 1870, effectively ending any need to tranship freight, and the Kentucky & Indiana Terminal (K&IT) Bridge was built in the 1880s, connecting Louisville with the east side of New Albany.* This was the first bridge to permit vehicles to cross as well as trains.*



    By the 1930s Louisville had grown up around Portland, which became a blue-collar, mostly Irish enclave in Louisvilles West End...sort of the "Bridgeport" or "Irish Channel" of Louisville. ..seperated from the city by industry & the K&IT RR grade elevations and sorting yards.* Remarkably, Shippingport still existed, too, though partially washed away by Ohio floods.* The 1937 Flood was the coup de grace for Shippingport, which was finally abandoned.* The flood also led to the construction of the levee & floodwall, which cut Portland off from the river (orange line in map below) and resulted in the removal of about half of "Portland Proper".*



    The construction of I-64 followed the levee in the 1960s/early 70s.

    Yet there is renewed interest in old Portland, as it is apparently a great archeological site.* The streets and wharf are still there as are the foundations of the old houses, shops, and inns, thus an "archeological park" has been proposed to reconnect Portland with the river



    Now, for a brief pix tour of this unusual neighborhood....

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    First, whats left of the Falls of the Ohio, looking at the "Indiana Chute"...the railroad bridge was the first across the Ohio at Louisville, and was designed to permit steamboats to pass under to use the chutes...



    Heading towards Portland we look back at downtown Louisville.* The vacant area in front used to be a notrious slum, "Bug Alley".


    Passing through an industrial area


    ..the streets begin to angle off Louisvilles grid as you enter Portland


    Nelligan Hall, a relic of Portlands' Irish past.* Louisville had as much or more Irish immigration as German and this was one of the three historical Irish neighborhoods.* Portland was the original home of St. Xavier, one of Louisville's Catholic high schools. "Portland Irish": the neighborhood had (still has) a rough reputation.


    Portland neighborhood shots.* Quite a bit of Italianate here, and also the frame bldg w. the metal roof is very "Louisville".




    Oddly enough, Louisville does not have a historical musuem, but Portland does...the Portland Museum is built around the old 'Beech Grove' house.* This is probably one of the very few neighborhood-specific musuems in the US.* *I have not visited due to the inconvenient hours.

    ...I think its geared mostly to school kids on field trips.

    More neighborhood shots...there are small buisness scattered around.






    And a good example of a "camelback" shotgun house..the second floor on the rear is the camelback. Urban legend has it that these where built so as to avoid taxes...the one story front meant the house would be taxed as one rather than two storys.* Not true, but a nice story.* Pretty typical later Louisville version details, too: the hip roof & rough cut stone columns on the porch.*



    The shotgun houseform is really a New Orleans specialty (supposedly originally from Hati, which was also a French colony), and this may have been the first neighborhood they appeared in in Louisville due to the local commercial connections with New Oreleans.* A carribean houseform in the Ohio Valley...

    Note the green chimney on the house to the right. Perhaps he got a deal from Shaheens Department Store across the street, who seemed to be using alot of green on that wall sign.* That Irish connection again....

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    On to the oldest part of Portland, "Portland Proper".*

    Notre Dame du Port...the present church dates from the 1870s.




    On the churchyard, some surving wharf chains


    The streets in this part of Portland are very wide, permitting perpendicular-to-the-curb parking, but are that way to permit easy movement and turning of horse and wagon teams working the wharf and Falls cargo transhipment trade.



    Close-ups of some of the oldest houses in Portland, and Louisville.*




    Though gone, from old illustrations the Portland wharf looked alot like the riverfronts in modern Ripley or Augusta.

    The Squire Jacob Earick house.* Supposedly the oldest in Portland, and one of the oldest in Louisville.* The house sits on a rise, sort of an artificial levee, and would have commanded a fine view of the river.* Urban legend has it that some of the interior supports were from a ship that wrecked at the Falls.*



    Unfortunatly it looks like a past attempt at restoration failed, and the house appears to be collapsing.

    The owner, Squire Earick....

    ....was a local magistrate as well as foundryman, and the cellar of the house was supposedly used as a jail.

    Portland streetscape


    The rise overlooking the river was a favored location for these italianate villas & townhouses, some build by steamboat captains.









    ..and one Federal rowhouse.


    Also, this part of Portland has a collection of early shotgun houses






    The Portland Cemetary is a bit of greenspace in the neighborhood, as well as the resting place of early Portlanders




    Another bit of neighborhood greenspace is the US Marine Hospital grounds, surrouned by a maginficent iron fence




    And the corner posts have a neat crossed-anchor-and-caduceus decorative device, with a "US" monogram below, worked into what looks like an acorn form.


    Deisgned by Robert Mills and built in 1851, the US Marine Hospital was one of seven built along the "western waters" to house ill boatmen.* This is the only one left, and as such was on the National Trusts 11 Most Endangered List because, as you can see, it is falling apart.


    The hospital had balconies so the boatmen could watch the passing river traffic on the Portland Canal while they recovered.


    ...the balconies have interesting decorative iron railings


    And, finally, back to the river.* A view of the modern Louisville and Portland canal from the levee, looking back towards Louisville...


  4. #4
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    Thank-you! I enjoyed this. The historical marker also lists Bishop Flaget; my dad and uncles attended the school named for him. His family lived in West End; my mom lived in Shively; I'll have to see how Portland fits in, and will for sure visit next time I'm in town.

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    Interesting area, although it did depress me. A few areas seemed quite bleak, although it might just be the grey weather rubbing off.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally posted by abrowne
    Interesting area, although it did depress me. A few areas seemed quite bleak, although it might just be the grey weather rubbing off.
    Portland is indeed a bit depressing but it has great bones and fabulous potential. Once (if?) the economic engine heats up, it has the possibility of becoming a destination neighborhood much like the Cherokee Triangle or Old Louisville. And yes, spring has a way of making it a little more palatable visually.

    One small quibble, Trinity Moses -- the K&ITRR bridge you show is actually a replacement bridge. The original was built in 1886. The present bridge was built 1912. It does have two outboard traffic lanes but they are currently closed. Mayor Abramson and the mayors in southern Indiana are working with the K&ITRR to reopen the traffic lanes to pedestrians and cyclists in order to link Louisville's greenway with those under construction on the Indiana side and then back again over the Big Four bridge in Jeffersonville.

    These pictures look recent -- when were you here?
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    Quote Originally posted by Gedunker
    Portland is indeed a bit depressing but it has great bones and fabulous potential. Once (if?) the economic engine heats up, it has the possibility of becoming a destination neighborhood much like the Cherokee Triangle or Old Louisville. And yes, spring has a way of making it a little more palatable visually.

    One small quibble, Trinity Moses -- the K&ITRR bridge you show is actually a replacement bridge. The original was built in 1886. The present bridge was built 1912. It does have two outboard traffic lanes but they are currently closed. Mayor Abramson and the mayors in southern Indiana are working with the K&ITRR to reopen the traffic lanes to pedestrians and cyclists in order to link Louisville's greenway with those under construction on the Indiana side and then back again over the Big Four bridge in Jeffersonville.

    These pictures look recent -- when were you here?
    I was in Louisville two or three weeks ago...

    Thanks a bunch for the remarks,,,,and for that correction on the age of the K&IT Bridge. I think the bridge in my first pix, the one across the Falls, was also rebuilt, though I wonder if both rebuilds used the existing piers? I do recall driving across the K&IT while in high school back in the 1970s..that was quite an experience due to the narrow, steel grate roadways and lack of proper gaurdrails between the roadway and river.

    Portland...I doubt it will ever become as fashionable as Old Louisville or Cherokee Triangle. This isn't a big villa district, really, & one of the appeals of those neighborhoods is the impressive architecture combined w. amenities like Cherokee Park or Central Park. The appeall of Portland is more "historical", sort of like Butchertown.

    I am happy to see that most of the houses in the older part of Portland are actually in pretty good condition, and are being kept up, with exception of that Earick house. Oddly enough that one is owned by the Portland Museum, which got a grant to remodel it. It doesnt seem like much work has been done?

    Yet, the thing that I think is really interesting is that proposed archeological park..tho I suspect it is too expensive and "blue sky" to ever really happen.

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    News

    Quote Originally posted by Trinity Moses
    I was in Louisville two or three weeks ago...

    Thanks a bunch for the remarks,,,,and for that correction on the age of the K&IT Bridge. I think the bridge in my first pix, the one across the Falls, was also rebuilt, though I wonder if both rebuilds used the existing piers? I do recall driving across the K&IT while in high school back in the 1970s..that was quite an experience due to the narrow, steel grate roadways and lack of proper gaurdrails between the roadway and river.

    Portland...I doubt it will ever become as fashionable as Old Louisville or Cherokee Triangle. This isn't a big villa district, really, & one of the appeals of those neighborhoods is the impressive architecture combined w. amenities like Cherokee Park or Central Park. The appeall of Portland is more "historical", sort of like Butchertown.

    I am happy to see that most of the houses in the older part of Portland are actually in pretty good condition, and are being kept up, with exception of that Earick house. Oddly enough that one is owned by the Portland Museum, which got a grant to remodel it. It doesnt seem like much work has been done?

    Yet, the thing that I think is really interesting is that proposed archeological park..tho I suspect it is too expensive and "blue sky" to ever really happen.

    First off, thank you for visiting Portland. I am a resident and a volunteer for the Portland Museum. So many things on this site are true, but there are things going on to put Portland back "on the map". The Squire Earick house is being restored. Dating has to take place first and it is a continual process. I can tell you that it is a Timber Frame structure and that areas have been added on. The Musuem wants to make sure that this house is as close to original as possible. So this will be a long project. The house is sound. The wallpaper and paint is also being studied to see when they might have been popular. The house is thought to have been built between 1811 and 1820, they are slowly finding out more each week.
    For the rest of Portland. There are many activities taking place to make Portland a destination site. The Wharf Park has money set aside. Metro Louisville is in charge of how soon, although those of us in the community would love to see it done by our 200th Bithday in 2011. For all of those who visit and are concerned there are many people in Portland who are working together to make sure that our future is bright.

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    I enjoyed this thread. The pictorial tour is great! I think it's absolutely true that a sunny day makes Portland look 10 times more welcoming. It is a bleak area and carries a stigma in Louisville as a less than great area. It is so close to downtown Louisville, and when you head west into Portland, things get run down pretty quickly. There are some beautiful homes and streets in Portland and some hideous ones. I think it will take a lot for much more than a few blocks of Portland to become a Cherokee Triangle. It needs help! I love looking at the old Marine hospital when I drive by on I-64. It's so stately and antebellum looking. What's going on with the locks down there?

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    Thanks

    The photos of Portland are wonderful! I made my first visit there this past September, another nice, less "bleak" season. My great-grandfather lived in the neighborhood with his family from around 1890 to around 1910 or so, after moving from Henry Co., KY, and before moving up to Detroit's car factories. (He worked as a blacksmith at the Whiteside Bakery on Broadway.) I was able to find their old home/apartment building on No. 29th St. The area struck me as gritty but with a lot of potential. The location is great. I hope to visit again this summer.

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    Amazing. Someone shoudl reconvert that Marine Hospital to habitation (loft apartments anyone?)

    Why oh why is it that the beat up neighborhoods in the US are usually the most characterful and charming?

    TM, what's the economy in Lousville like? This could be a nice project for an NU developer
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  12. #12
    Luca: The economy in Louisville is pretty stable. Housing costs have risen but not in the range of major metros on the coasts or in the sunbelt. Generally, the city and its metro area remain very affordable.

    The issue with Portland is that it is located in that "zone in transition", e.g., it's not downtown, and it's not a residential enclave removed from downtown. To some extent Portland is also burdened with a number of major factories (either in it or nearby) that have given investors some pause. Still, I think there are developers that see the opportunities and will take the risks when the time and economy are right.

    It's great to see Metro Louisville becoming engaged with Portland. There have been lots of neighborhood organizations struggling to keep it afloat. I do have great hopes for a Portland renaissance.

    Slightly OT: a barge broke loose on the Ohio River yesterday (1-26-06) careened over the spillway and slammed into several of the K&ITRR bridge's pilings. It is still lodged there as I write, possibly leaking diesel fuel and liquid asphalt into the Ohio. Coast Guard and Corps of Engineers personnel are watching closely, in fear that the 80' long barge breaks and heads downriver toward the I-64 bridge. I could smell diesel fumes outside my house this a.m.
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    moving to Portland

    Hello to all,
    I enjoyed these pictures. They give me a preview as I plan to purchase property in this area for my self and relocate sometime next year. The area reminds me a little bit of Golden Hill in San Diego. When driving through one block is just beautiful and the next your saying "oh my gawd.. quick lock the doors. Golden Hill by the way has continually improved, more and more homes are being restored. Maybe I'm naive,, but I see Portland as having a chance at getting "back on the map"

    Quote Originally posted by MaryT
    First off, thank you for visiting Portland. I am a resident and a volunteer for the Portland Museum. So many things on this site are true, but there are things going on to put Portland back "on the map". The Squire Earick house is being restored. Dating has to take place first and it is a continual process. I can tell you that it is a Timber Frame structure and that areas have been added on. The Musuem wants to make sure that this house is as close to original as possible. So this will be a long project. The house is sound. The wallpaper and paint is also being studied to see when they might have been popular. The house is thought to have been built between 1811 and 1820, they are slowly finding out more each week.
    For the rest of Portland. There are many activities taking place to make Portland a destination site. The Wharf Park has money set aside. Metro Louisville is in charge of how soon, although those of us in the community would love to see it done by our 200th Bithday in 2011. For all of those who visit and are concerned there are many people in Portland who are working together to make sure that our future is bright.

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    Update for Portland

    Just some update information about Portland.

    The Marine Hospital is being restored--paint has been removed from the bricks and a cupola has been placed. the smock stack has been removed. It will become a visitors center.
    The locks are being expanded lots of activity there.
    Portland was designated a Preserve America Neighborhood in April--the museum received a grant to design and implement three heritage trails.
    A preservation alliance has been formed.
    Concerning the Wharf Park--the design called for a entrance to be created at the the foot of 33rd or 34th Streets, but this requires cutting through the levee (floodwall) at a price of about six million dollars--so other alternatives are being explored. Archeological digs this summer uncovered a "out house" , well and cistern. Along with a large foundation. There was some theory that it may be Jim Porters Coffee House, but more information is needed before it can be stated as fact.
    The barge has been removed and everything looks okay.
    Sparkplug--hope you find Portland to your liking.

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    Marine Hospital update

    I read on BusinessFirst that the Marine Hospital in Portland might form a partnership with the Univeristy of Louisville....this sounds positive!!
    read the article here:

    http://louisville.bizjournals.com/louisville/stories/2007/03/26/story8.html?i=76317&b=1174881600^1436452

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    I love this thread! I am from louisville and was totally uninformed on this area. I currently live in the suburbs and have been researching moving back into the city. I have been looking into the Butchertown and Clifton areas, which are enjoying a revitalization currently. The city is really on an upswing, and I would love to see it expand into the Portland area. I confess I knew nothing about the rich history of Portland, I thought the Irish were in the highlands and while of course I knew about Flaget, I didnt know St X was from that area. Thanks for the info!

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    Gas Prices Good News for Portland

    I believe that the unfortunate circumstances of high fuel prices will accelerate the interest and redevelopment of Portland and other neighborhoods surrounding the CBD. As suburban neighborhood housing values drop with the rise in gas prices, neighborhoods like the Highlands near downtown are seeing increases in home values and interest in redevelopment. So much so, that in the case of the Highlands, due to rising home values, adjacent neighborhoods such as Germantown are reaping the rewards of the spillover effect. Once Louisville figures out how to negate the physical or at least psychological barrier that the 9th street exit has on West Louisville, the Portland neighborhood should see a real rebirth moving west from 9th street.

    Hopefully this will also bring about a renewed interest in streetcar and lightrail initiatives in the city. Louisville has a great framework to build from. If we could increase densities and advance transit oriented design, Louisville (including the Portland Neighborhood) could become one of the most walkable and vibrant mid-size cities in the US.

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    Portland

    I lived in Portland in 1950 to1965 and I graduated from Flaget High School.Thanks for the pictures,, they brought back memories.One of the pictures was my Grandfather's house for over 50 years and I ran around with a kid who lived next door to the Marine Hospital.Regan closed all Sea Faring Men's Hospitals when he was in office.Thanks again..... PS : Portland was has safe as anyplace in the Country,,,my sister and I walked everywhere at a young age and they had a trolley system.

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    Quote Originally posted by wcsmithiii View post
    I lived in Portland in 1950 to1965 and I graduated from Flaget High School.Thanks for the pictures,, they brought back memories.One of the pictures was my Grandfather's house for over 50 years and I ran around with a kid who lived next door to the Marine Hospital.Regan closed all Sea Faring Men's Hospitals when he was in office.Thanks again..... PS : Portland was has safe as anyplace in the Country,,,my sister and I walked everywhere at a young age and they had a trolley system.
    My dad graduated from Flaget in 1952, and an uncle graduated from there a few years later.

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    My Dad grew up in that neighborhood in the 1940s and 1950s

    Help! I desperately want to find pictures / video from the 1940s & 1950s of some specific places in Portland Ky. If you have some, please contact me. My dad fell in love with music listening to a guy he calls "Blind Jimmy" play ragtime on the piano at Redman Hall while his mom played Bingo there. He bought balloons at Black's Dry Goods and got his hair cut at Jesse's Barber Shop. He went to Our Lady School from 1947 to 1956 and St X after that. He saw Moon's cleaners burn down. And he also lived on Rudd Ave.
    I need the material to make a video storie of my dad. You can see some of what I have finished on YouTube. Just search for Willie Bibb.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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    What a wonderful thread!

    Just discovered this site this morning.

    I grew up in Portland. I lived right across the street from the "Old Marine Hospital" (as we called it). We moved from there in the mid-60s, as our home was one that the city bought in order to build I-64 through there.

    My grandparents lived just a block down the street and owned/operated a bakery that made Zimmerman's Fried Pies--long before Hostess started making pies. Their house was also bought by the city due to the I-64 construction project. They moved just a couple of blocks away to a 3-story red brick house at Portland and 23rd Streets, catty cornered from the hospital. There they opened a new bakery in the garage/building in back of the house and made doughnuts that my grandfather sold in the neighborhood out of the back of his pick-up truck.

    When we moved from Portland, we relocated in the West End, but when I was about 14, I spent some of my summers doing volunteer work at the Marine Hospital. I still remember playing on the grounds of the Hospital, making clover chains and whiling away the hours (before our move). My sisters and I also spent a great deal of time playing in Lannon Park which was out behind our house.

    We all attended Dolfinger Elementary until our relocation.

    I also would love to find pictures of the area, prior to the construction of I-64, which would be late-fifties to the mid-sixties.

    Wow, it's been great reminiscing about all of this. I ended up joining the Air Force and completing a military career, but before that happened, I spent a short while living in an apartment on the second floor of my grandparents home at 23rd and Portland, when my parents elected to move across the river to Sellersburg. I was 18/19 at the time.

    If anyone out there reading this thread has any luck locating pictures of the area, please give me a shout!

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    Wishful Dreaming

    I also grew up in Portland and was brainwashed into the "Proud to be From Portland" mindset, but all I see is those who can afford to get out of Portland...GET OUT. The whole neighborhood is full of run down buildings and houses and is infested by drugs, poverty and crime. Granted, it would be wonderful for Portland to "rise from the dead" but it will not happen in this decade nor the next unless an investor comes in and buys up many of the condemned homes (that the poor people still live in) displace those poor people, and make Portland an extension of downtown Louisville. Otherwise, Portland will continue to be the oozing open wound on Louisville's landscape.

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    One misperception of the area is the thought that it ends at the expressway, which is an artificial boundary. Actually, original Portland ends at 39th Street, I know because I own the house at that corner, which was right on the original boundary line, and was built between 1840-1850, and my lot was part of the original plat done by Lytle in 1812.

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    I grew up in Parkland and one of my brother's best friends was Jack Zimmerman. Jack spent a lot of time at our house and hardly ever showed up without a bag of Zimmerman's Fried Pies. I remember eating them around a bonfire while sledding in Irquois Park. The chocolate were my favorite.

    Quote Originally posted by awordqueen View post
    Just discovered this site this morning.

    I grew up in Portland. I lived right across the street from the "Old Marine Hospital" (as we called it). We moved from there in the mid-60s, as our home was one that the city bought in order to build I-64 through there.

    My grandparents lived just a block down the street and owned/operated a bakery that made Zimmerman's Fried Pies--long before Hostess started making pies. Their house was also bought by the city due to the I-64 construction project. They moved just a couple of blocks away to a 3-story red brick house at Portland and 23rd Streets, catty cornered from the hospital. There they opened a new bakery in the garage/building in back of the house and made doughnuts that my grandfather sold in the neighborhood out of the back of his pick-up truck.

    When we moved from Portland, we relocated in the West End, but when I was about 14, I spent some of my summers doing volunteer work at the Marine Hospital. I still remember playing on the grounds of the Hospital, making clover chains and whiling away the hours (before our move). My sisters and I also spent a great deal of time playing in Lannon Park which was out behind our house.

    We all attended Dolfinger Elementary until our relocation.

    I also would love to find pictures of the area, prior to the construction of I-64, which would be late-fifties to the mid-sixties.

    Wow, it's been great reminiscing about all of this. I ended up joining the Air Force and completing a military career, but before that happened, I spent a short while living in an apartment on the second floor of my grandparents home at 23rd and Portland, when my parents elected to move across the river to Sellersburg. I was 18/19 at the time.

    If anyone out there reading this thread has any luck locating pictures of the area, please give me a shout!

  25. #25

    Zimmerman's Fried pies

    My family bought Zimmerman's Fried Pie Co from Jack's dad. Who I knew only as Mr.Zimmerman. Jack and his two sisters lived with their dad and next store to their dad. I remember the chickens they had in their yard behind the bakery. I don't remember any fencing between the house and the bakery so the chicken's came right up to the doors.
    They all trained my family on the production process...I only remember going to Janet and Judy's house once, it seemed so big. I think the time frame was mid 1960's thru 1970.
    My mother and my siblings loved making,eating and delivering the pies. Mr Zimmerman was a very patient man (he had to be dealing with newbies to the bakery business)
    In 1972 we moved to California and soon after the business was closed down. Years later my parents donated the building and land it sat on to a charity. I haven't been back to see it for years.
    It was actually on Lytle Street. The Zimmerman's house faced on 23rd.St I believe.
    One block down the street was a small market that sold chicken salad, big red that we purchased every day for our lunch. Of course we topped the sandwich off with
    a hot fried pie right out of the fryer that "Red" had glazed earlier......Red was a person who finished off the pies after we produced them on a maple top table. I remember him going into the back room where he would gather spider webs to use on his skin if he got spattered with oil from the fryer....Wow such memories. Every part of the process was done by hand. Not anymore...

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