Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Page 1 of 6 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 142

Thread: Depression

  1. #1
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    on my 15 minute break
    Posts
    17,533

    Depression

    Anyone else here suffer from depression? Anyone know if anti-depressants actually improve the quality of one's existence?
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Greenescapist's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,169
    Gee, I guess this forum is mostly anonymous. I had about 4 years in my late teens and early twenties where things weren't right. I had some therapy and medication. The medication definitely helped in conjunction with lifestyle changes and better self-awareness.

  3. #3
    Corn Burning Fool giff57's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 1998
    Location
    On the Mother River
    Posts
    4,512
    Off and on, never got bad enough to want the drugs though. Therapy and exercise generaly works for me.
    “As soon as public service ceases to be the chief business of the citizens, and they would rather serve with their money than with their persons, the State is not far from its fall”
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Queen B's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2003
    Location
    "Somewhere in the middle"
    Posts
    3,160
    I would highly recommend excercise for mild depression and strongly recommend for bad depression. Excercise and sunshine.

    Medication absolutely works, I will refrain from getting on my soap box about all the benefits should anyone have questions, I have a degree and a 15 year career in this field so if anybody ever has questions my shingle is always up and open for discussion.
    It is all a matter of perspective!!!

  5. #5
         
    Registered
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    3,519
    I do not suffer from depression, but I have been depressed. Your queston is related to meds so I will give you my opinion. When my husband walked out I was devastated and had just had a baby (3 days old) so no telling what was going on with my head and body...I called my doctor, told her my situation and that I thought I was going to fall apart. She prescribed Prozac for me, now that takes a month to be fully effective BUT it worked for me. I quit taking it a few months later when I could think and breath normal again. I really think it got me through a very difficult situation that I could not have handled as well without.
    I believe that anti-depressants work but in many (most cases) there are other factors to depression and some type of threapy should be integrated into situation.
    I know there are many others here with much more backgrouns on this topic, this is just my experience.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally posted by giff57
    Off and on, never got bad enough to want the drugs though. Therapy and exercise generaly works for me.

    I have suffered severe depression for almost half my teenage/adult life and am presently in the midst of a 4-5 year long depression.

    I had inklings of depression as early as 12, but was for the most part generally content until I was almost age 15. From age 14 to 22 was the first major bout, with 20-21 being the absolute worst. 1985 was the worst year of my life at that point.

    Then things got better for a while by age 22. My peak in confidence was about age 24, and thereafter there was a steady erosion in self-esteem and the attending increase in depression. But nothing really bad.

    When my kids were born in 1998 and 2000 things were better for a while, but beginning in 2001, with the death of my grandfather and then my father a year later, I was once again severely depressed.

    All the way up until 2003 though, I thought things would never be as bad as 1985. But I am sad to report that 2004 has now taken the crown as the worst year ever, and so far in 2005, things are even worse.

    Now I am actually nostalgic about 1985. For as bad as things were back then, at least I had my youth.

  7. #7
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    at the neighboring pub
    Posts
    5,198
    My Dad had a bout with depression when he was "laid-off" a couple of years ago (he had a solid, well-documented age discrimination case, but he didn't pursue).

    My dad is a really proud man that had been nothing but successful during his 35-year career in banking, so it hit him pretty hard. He did the medication thing despite his hatred for doctors, which really seemed to help him out. He also kept himself constantly busy working on the honey-do list from my mom, most of which was outside. It also got him in better shape.

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  8. #8
         
    Registered
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    3,519
    Quote Originally posted by Super Amputee Cat
    I have suffered severe depression for almost half my teenage/adult life and am presently in the midst of a 4-5 year long depression.

    I had inklings of depression as early as 12, but was for the most part generally content until I was almost age 15. From age 14 to 22 was the first major bout, with 20-21 being the absolute worst. 1985 was the worst year of my life at that point.

    Then things got better for a while by age 22. My peak in confidence was about age 24, and thereafter there was a steady erosion in self-esteem and the attending increase in depression. But nothing really bad.

    When my kids were born in 1998 and 2000 things were better for a while, but beginning in 2001, with the death of my grandfather and then my father a year later, I was once again severely depressed.

    All the way up until 2003 though, I thought things would never be as bad as 1985. But I am sad to report that 2004 has now taken the crown as the worst year ever, and so far in 2005, things are even worse.

    Now I am actually nostalgic about 1985. For as bad as things were back then, at least I had my youth.
    You are obviously aware of it, do you take meds? Do you see someone? Does any of it help at all?

  9. #9
    Cyburbian GeogPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Capital Region, NY
    Posts
    1,429
    I'm getting depressed reading this...

    I was in a real low about 3 years ago after splitting up with my fiancee. I've been diagnosed with some PTSD and have bouts of associated depression. A doc suggested meds but I didn't care for them. Found that I can control it better on my own...know the signs and triggers and how to adjust.
    Information necessitating a change of design will be conveyed to the designer after and only after the design is complete. (Often called the 'Now They Tell Us' Law) - Fyfe's First Law of Revision

    We don't believe in planners and deciders making the decisions on behalf of Americans. -- George W. Bush , Scranton, PA -- 09/06/2000

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
    Registered
    Sep 1999
    Location
    400 miles from Orlando
    Posts
    13,743
    I've been on a number of different anti-anxiety meds over the last 4-5 years and none of them worked, or worked but made me extremely ill. About 2 months ago, my doctor prescribed something new and I could feel positive changes within a week or so. It's so good to find something that works; anxiety can be just as crippling as depression, and often is treated with the same meds.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian boilerplater's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Heaven or Las Vegas
    Posts
    916
    Yes, the meds work. Definately made my life more enjoyable. If you want to read about why they work, see "Listening to Prozac".
    The most annoying thing about depression is how other people percieve it, as it is common to get depressed over a disappointing life event or personal failing. People ask "Why are you depressed?" You don't ask someone with leukemia why they have the disease. When you understand depression as a disease, treating it as such becomes a different matter than trying to change the circumstances that you or others believe are causing it. Everyone faces disappointments, friends and relatives pass on, but some are more affected by it. I really envy those who are happy most of the time. Its a matter of brain chemistry.
    Adrift in a sea of beige

  12. #12
    Cyburbian abrowne's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    1,584
    Medication is interesting... they all play with neurotransmitters. Thing is, we're still not entirely sure which of them to poke at. Tricyclic antidepressants inhibit reuptake of norepinephrine, but as a side effect they also elevate levels of seratonin. MAO inhibitors inhibit the enzyme that breaks down norepinephrine, but these can be very serious and dangerous (side effects incude death). SSRI's, like Prozac, focus only on seratonin.

    As far as I know the medical profession right now treats norepinephrine as the mechanism of depression, but the idea that seratonin is involved is gaining credence as well. Prozac has gotten a bad wrap in the last while because of its status as a bit of a society-drug that is not necessarily prescribed appropriately, but it is effective nonetheless, in most cases.

    The main thing to watch out for is to make sure your doctor is giving you responsible doses, titrating, trying to find a balance. You do not want to become reliant on these medications.

  13. #13

    Registered
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Solano County, California
    Posts
    6,468
    There is a tendency towards depression in the male side of my family. My father-definitely. My brother-definitely-although he seems to be now snapping out of it. Myself-I tend to the gloomy and passive and solitary.

    Should these personality traits be medicalized as depression? I don't know. (NOte: I'm not denying that there are cases where depression should be treated. Only questioning whether all cases of gloomyness should be)

  14. #14
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2001
    Location
    West Valley, AZ
    Posts
    3,894
    Quote Originally posted by boilerplater
    Yes, the meds work. Definately made my life more enjoyable. If you want to read about why they work, see "Listening to Prozac".
    The most annoying thing about depression is how other people percieve it, as it is common to get depressed over a disappointing life event or personal failing. People ask "Why are you depressed?" You don't ask someone with leukemia why they have the disease. When you understand depression as a disease, treating it as such becomes a different matter than trying to change the circumstances that you or others believe are causing it. Everyone faces disappointments, friends and relatives pass on, but some are more affected by it. I really envy those who are happy most of the time. Its a matter of brain chemistry.
    Also, a lot of depression is not really caused by loss. It's just a malaise; an unmotivated feeling; pointlessness to everything. I was talking with my doc about the last year of events and the noticable weight loss that occured and he confidently diagnosed me as having mild depression. That rocked my world. I was the last person to expect to be depressed. After hearing of the symptoms, the diagnosis, etc. Everyone gets depressed from time to time. Some can overcome it by setting goals and achieving those goals, some needs meds, some just need to talk to someone.
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian Jen's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    1,455
    I ws just talking to a friend today, who started buying St Johnswort for her husband and he really says it work to lighten the depression. I don't know if he is clinically depressed or just prone to gloomy moods or whatever but my friend says it works and has even bought a childrens version for her son who was prone to explosive tantrums at 9 yo and she says it is working wonders.

    Your Mileage may vary (YMMV)of course!

  16. #16
    Cyburbian boilerplater's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Heaven or Las Vegas
    Posts
    916
    Should these personality traits be medicalized as depression? I don't know. (NOte: I'm not denying that there are cases where depression should be treated. Only questioning whether all cases of gloomyness should be)
    Apparently there has been a lot of discussion of this in the psychiatric community. In "Listening to Prozac", the author devotes a chapter to what they call "cosmetic psychopharmacology". Just like out society pushes people to have cosmetic surgery, it pushes them to make their personalities as appealing as possible. Superficial? yeah, and with a tendency to making people more bland. Robert Smith made a career of being gloomy, but it didn't work for me, so I decided to try to make my personality more appealing. I felt like I was willing to accept my depression, but the world around me was not. That book also gets into the value of the worriers to a society. In primal societies, they were the ones who whined about the need to get ready for winter, to conserve, to worry about the dangers beyond, so they kept them around, realizing their value to the tribe.
    Adrift in a sea of beige

  17. #17
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Someplace between yesterday and tomorrow.
    Posts
    11,959
    I have never been depressed, but I know people who are. Their medications worked a little, but it caused other concerns.

    I am going to echo the exercise thing that has been listed several times above. I know people that have been for the most part ok, and they are much, MUCH, happier after they started to work out on a regular occasion.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  18. #18
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    on my 15 minute break
    Posts
    17,533
    Quote Originally posted by boilerplater
    When you understand depression as a disease, treating it as such becomes a different matter than trying to change the circumstances that you or others believe are causing it. Everyone faces disappointments, friends and relatives pass on, but some are more affected by it. I really envy those who are happy most of the time. Its a matter of brain chemistry.
    Thank you for pointing out this out - it's about an inner state, not an external set of circumstances. You DO understand. Now how do you get everyone else to?
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  19. #19
         
    Registered
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    3,519
    I will definately echo working out. I typically go in spurts, work out, quit, work out, quit...lately the times that I quit are far and few between because I see how bad I feel when I am not working out and how much better I feel with regular excersice. I wake up earlier, not so groggy when I do wake up, accomplish more, look better, feel better. I am not so naive as to think it can fix all types of depression but I firmly believe it can help. As with many diseases, a healthy lifestyle makes it a little easier.

  20. #20
    Cyburbian MitchBaby's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    179
    I look at meds for depression as a stop-gap measure. eg, while at Uni finishing my Master's in Planning, there was no doubt I was depressed - I didn't like the city, classmates, weather, etc. Therefore I never slept, had no drive to get exercise, or to go to class or anything. So, I sought some help and within a couple of weeks I started to feel better, and two months after that I stopped taking the meds because I was exercising again, almost finished my degree, and well, I was almost done.

    I know that meds are good in some cases, though I worry about how frequently they are now prescribed and how they've become a permanent fix, instead of a means to an end. That is particularly worrisome to me. The best solution to any of it is a new hobby, exercise and sunshine as someone mentioned - its amazing how depressing it is living in a place that had 4-5 weeks of -20 degrees or more with no sunshine.

    Maybe that's why Vancouver is where I choose to live - I never get depressed here - I look out the window and think that this is an amazing place to live...
    Mitchbaby: Proud to be a :canada: planner and a :canada: surfer

  21. #21
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    7,061
    Quote Originally posted by Maister
    Thank you for pointing out this out - it's about an inner state, not an external set of circumstances. You DO understand. Now how do you get everyone else to?
    Stupid, just woke up and making a fool of myself answer, sigh:

    You have to have good things in your soul to balance or push out the bad things. When all that is in there is pain, you are depressed and hopeless. When you find positive experiences to heal those things, not much really rattles you.


    Ducking for cover now.

  22. #22

    Registered
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    1,548
    I've fought depression off and on during my life, much like Super Amputee Cat has. It's easy to remember when my depressive periods happened; they're the periods when, as I look back, memories and events are extremely clouded and blurry.

    I first became aware of it when I was 16, and the last 1 1/2 years of high school were very tough. No diagnosis, though, and no drugs. College was a relative high point for me -- lots of mental stimulation and physical exercise just pushed the depressive stuff out of my system. But after college, from like 1987-1992, I sorta plateaued, and then from 1992-2002 I went through a downward spiral that was brought on by many setbacks and personal tragedies -- my wife was cheating on me in a bad marriage that ended in divorce, my son was born severely prematurely and spent 3 1/2 months in intensive care (he's 100% fine now), I lost my best friend in a car accident, my mother had two heart attacks and nearly died, I got laid off, I made other bad career decisions and had two extended periods of unemployment lasting nearly a year each.

    Jeez, I get depressed again just thinking about it Needless to say, the '90s was not a good decade for me.

    I did medication for awhile, starting in '99, and that's when I met my wife. I took meds off and on until '02, and I've been off since. Now I just make sure I get sunlight, exercise and eat well. And prayer/meditation works for me too.

  23. #23
    Cyburbian nerudite's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Edmonton
    Posts
    5,502
    I have gone in and out of depressive states in my life, but never clinically diagnosed. I'm lucky, because I don't usually go more than a week or two with depression before I start feeling better. I can't say that I'm a real high energy person, but I do keep fairly busy around the house even when I don't need to be. When the depression hits, it's pretty recognizable because I can sit for long periods of time without doing *anything*. I mean totally zoning out and not caring that I'm getting nothing done. My sleep patterns totally change, where I can sleep almost any time of the day and still not affect my sleep at night. I feel lethargic and uninterested in most things. For the most part I have been in and out of this since my brother died, but I think overall I'm doing pretty well. Going to EAP helps... and I've tried to up my exercise to give me more energy in the long run.

  24. #24
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    7,061
    Oh, let me add that, these days, if I feel depressed for more than 3 days, it is almost always due to anemia. Then the solution is treating the anemia.

    HTH.

  25. #25
    Cyburbian GISgal's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    277
    My soon-to-be mother-in-law and SO both have depression. WIthout their medication day-to-day activities would probably not be possible.
    “I am not discouraged, because every wrong attempt discarded is another step forward.” - Thomas Edison

+ Reply to thread
Page 1 of 6 1 2 ... LastLast

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 27
    Last post: 30 Sep 2008, 3:03 PM
  2. Deliberate Depression
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 7
    Last post: 30 Nov 2006, 12:12 PM
  3. Thoughts On Depression & Death
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 23
    Last post: 22 Jun 2006, 10:09 PM
  4. Great Depression Discussion
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 26
    Last post: 24 Jan 2006, 10:42 AM
  5. Professional sports and depression
    Economic and Community Development
    Replies: 2
    Last post: 15 Mar 1998, 5:45 PM