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Thread: C is for Carrot, that is not good enough for me.

  1. #1
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    C is for Carrot, that is not good enough for me.

    Seems like Cookie monster is getting a makeover to reduce his obsession with cookies. Seems his actions contribute to childhood obesity. Sad world. Who is going to sing along with "Cookies are a sometimes food"?


    http://edition.cnn.com/2005/SHOWBIZ/...essmonster.ap/
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  2. #2
         
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    I guess I have mixed emotions, but mostly I think its absurd. Sesame Street is not a childs sole source of learning, something needs to be fun and silly in thier lives. Its the parents and schools job to educate children on eating habits, not Cookie Monster's job. If Sesame Street wants to teach the importance of good eating habits, find a different way. hughgugh how ridiculous things have become.

  3. #3
    The hypocrisy of course is that Sesame Street, has no problem at all allowing commercial interests to use their Muppet Chacaters for corporate profit. Remember Big Bird plugging mini-vans a few years ago? And recenlty I've seen other muppet characters in commercials for various other products.

    So while little Johnny and Little Susie spend endless hours in the back of the van watching vacuous television programming saturated with commercials for sugary snacks and cereals, the marketers at Sesame Street can rest assure that they have made the right decision in having the Cookie Monster going PC and eating carrots.


  4. #4
    Cyburbian Plus Whose Yur Planner's avatar
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    I have mixed feelings about it as well. My 5 year old saw the picture in the newspaper this past weekend and we talked about it. So, any thing that will help them eat healthy food is a positive. However, I think we shove too much down a kids throat too soon. We don't allow them the space to be kids, have fun, explore and learn naturally in safe environments.

  5. #5
         
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    Quote Originally posted by Whose Yur Planner
    I have mixed feelings about it as well. My 5 year old saw the picture in the newspaper this past weekend and we talked about it. So, any thing that will help them eat healthy food is a positive. However, I think we shove too much down a kids throat too soon. We don't allow them the space to be kids, have fun, explore and learn naturally in safe environments.
    Ditto, I think thats what I was trying to say, but couldn't get it out

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Whose Yur Planner
    However, I think we shove too much down a kids throat too soon. We don't allow them the space to be kids, have fun, explore and learn naturally in safe environments.
    IMO, that's partly (or maybe even mostly) because parents/families don't get enough societal support these days. Both parents are basically expected to have a paycheck. That means we have a lot fewer stay-at-home parents than we used to. Family benefits -- like medical coverage for the whole family -- are eroding (and have already greatly eroded). That puts further financial pressure on parents to prioritize time spent earning more income and that means less time for the kids. Etc ad nauseum.

    It is and to me that this seems to not be patently obvious to everyone.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Plus Whose Yur Planner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Michele Zone
    IMO, that's partly (or maybe even mostly) because parents/families don't get enough societal support these days. Both parents are basically expected to have a paycheck. That means we have a lot fewer stay-at-home parents than we used to. Family benefits -- like medical coverage for the whole family -- are eroding (and have already greatly eroded). That puts further financial pressure on parents to prioritize time spent earning more income and that means less time for the kids. Etc ad nauseum.

    It is and to me that this seems to not be patently obvious to everyone.
    What concerns me is that everyone has an agenda. While I think we need to make kids aware of things, we don't give them enough space to be kids. My 5 year old doesn't care some groups agenda. All she cares about is being a princess, playing with her kitty, and bugging the heck out of her older sister, that's it. Plus, that's all she needs to care about.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian
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    They aren't giving kids enough credit! It just so happens my 3-yr old and I watched an all-Cookie Monster 30 minute Sesame street video together today. And later on, after lunch we had a cookie, and I asked her can we eat a whole plate of cookies like cookie monster did, and of course she shook her head and laughed and said no. Can't there be some childish humor on tv????

    Of course I do know houses where kids have unlimited access to eat whatever they want...again, the issue of why can't parents be parents, why does media/society take over, cereal commercials vs. carrot monster...

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Whose Yur Planner
    What concerns me is that everyone has an agenda. While I think we need to make kids aware of things, we don't give them enough space to be kids. My 5 year old doesn't care some groups agenda. All she cares about is being a princess, playing with her kitty, and bugging the heck out of her older sister, that's it. Plus, that's all she needs to care about.
    Yes, developmentally, kids who are worried about things like that are psychologically damaged. Kids under a certain age (12 or 14 or so) never worry about "the future" UNLESS they have been psychologically traumatized by something like the death of a parent. The agenda you speak of is reflective of a general lack of understanding of child development. A lot of parents do the same kind of thing. In my mind, it seems that treating kids like they are short adults who are developmentally capable of addressing such things -- and should -- also speaks to the immaturity and irresponsibility of the adults. Adults who want kids to worry about good nutrition, etc, often are not wanting to really raise the kids -- they don't want to be hassled with actually being responsible for another human being who can't make such judgments. I wish I knew a better way to say that because I know it sounds inflammatory. But my kids do not resent it when I tell them "Age and experience count for something" and I put them in their place because that is not used solely as a means to bust their chops. They get told the same thing when they screw up: "You are too young to know better. No biggie. Kids do stuff like that. With age and experience, you will get better." and then they aren't punished because, well, they aren't old enough or experienced enough to reasonably hold them to X standard. Often, the "age and experience" argument only gets pulled out when an adult is trying to quash the child and make them "behave". It is a powerplay and it gets resented and the kids remain defiant. My kids don't remain defiant because comments like that are part of a larger picture where Mom is the responsible adult and it is not their job to worry about some things.

    It makes me crazy when, for example, parents start exchanging ideas for how best to punish a child under the age of 12 for not doing things they are developmentally unable to do until after the age of 12. When I can, I step in and try to explain to them that their expectations are unreasonable and all the punishment in the world is unlikely to help -- they will see this issue improve when the child is developmentally capable of the kind of behaviors they desire. And society does the same kind of thing when it tries to teach good nutrition to toddlers via Cookie Monster. Ugh. I guess next we need to ferret out "playing princess" because it is classist and sexist and good little feminists should prefer baseball and other competitive sports.

    Sorry for the length. I can't figure out a way to shorten it.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    This is your government speaking: You will not eat more than one (1) cookie.

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