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Thread: Dayton, Ohio..Tals Corner (lots of pix)

  1. #1
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    Dayton, Ohio..Tals Corner (lots of pix)

    I was driving downtown the other day via Tals Corner, and noticed that a landmark building is vacant, might be on its way out....(landmark maybe only to me).

    Tals Corner...when I first moved here I thought it meant a persons name or nickname.."Tal" or "Talley" (like 'Talleys Corner', that work of urban sociology).* Turns out it stands for Third And Linden +Springfield Streets...TALS...Tals....the threeway crowsfoot intersection between these three streets.

    Originally Third ended here and forked out into two turnpikes, one to Xenia (which became Linden) the other to Springfield (which became Springfield Street).* Around 1870-1871 a horsecar line was built to about Findlay Street and Thrid was extended east...

    The area to the west of the corner was older, though, mostly subdivided during the antebellum periods and Civil War erar (some as part of the Dayton Hydraulic waterpower development).

    This is one of Dayton outlying buisness districts, but you can see grand old houses, still, from the horsecar era.



    Coming into Tals Corner from Springfield Street:




    Note the mural on the walls, and fancy signwork. This building was still a grocery when I moved to town in 1988, ("Midnight Market") later it became a used record store....








    Old mansion between commercial buildings



    A Mexican store...this place was the former "La Tienda", the guy who ran it was some sort of activist type, but got involved in some illegal immigration scam and was busted.* The place is now under new owneship.* Though Mexican the store is here this isn't a Mexican neighborhood... there are no true barrios in Dayton.



    Second Empire next to 1920s or Teens commercial...





    19th century commercial.* Donut shops seems to be a local thing here in Dayton.







    ...an old italiante foursquare villa hidden by a modern addition:





    Wide, wide Third Street looking west toward downtown.* The horsecar, later streetcar, lines went down the middle lanes.* The area here is moving into an industrial area that developed around the canal and railroads...we are very close to the Front Street waterpower district



    Looking back east downt Third.* The street maintains this width until the Linden/Springfield split, then it narrows a bit as it heads deeper into east Dayton.


    Originally a Presbyterian church...dates to at least 1875


    The Huffman Historic district is the streets to the south, off of Third...these sidestreets to the south are still intact..to the north of Third the housing was all removed.




    The Huffman Historic District people have a good online Street by Street Tour, where they have pretty much documented the neighborhood in pix....I didn't take any pix of the great old houses on Linden Street (which is the southern entry into Tals Corner) as they are already online at that site.

    Interesting pix..note the facades on all three of these buildings have been altered or modernized to convert the old houses to commercial uses


    Except this one, which is a contractors office:




    Big old apt building.* This must've been a busy area in the 1920s...




    This vacant lot was once the site of a fairly big & grand looking neo-romanesque building, fairly tall too, that I think might have been a lodge hall with retail on the ground floor.* It was apts in 1988.* But it burned in the early 1990s. and now a nice view opens up to the industrial belt in the adjacent neighborhood.


    More former retail at the point


    Coming into Tals Corner from Linden




    ..and the point itself...between Third & Springfield Streets


    Looking east down Springfield Street


    Looking east down Third to the area subdivided in the 1870s...pix of this neighborhood in a later thread..

  2. #2
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    that's a pretty nice neighborhood...though it looks forlorn.

    Is there any significant development pressures for the area, or it is kind of in a holding pattern?

  3. #3
    Huffman Historic district
    That's a beautiful place to live. It'd be nice if you could get pics taken from a tall building for perspective of the entire area. Thanks for the great post!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally posted by The Irish One
    That's a beautiful place to live. It'd be nice if you could get pics taken from a tall building for perspective of the entire area. Thanks for the great post!
    Well, the best i can do is this aerial photograph..the circled building to the left of the pix is that old Presbyterian church I posted pix of in the thread. The street its on is Third....which you can follow to the right, to the east, to the fork at Tals Corner...Linden is the street angling to the lower right hand corner, Springfield toward (roughly) the upper right hand corner.

    The Huffman Historic Distirct is pretty much eveything south of Third toward one block beyond Linden.

    You can see the industrial developement north of Third..alot of this was housing but was torn down to make an in-town industrial park.



    There is a big church on Linden which is a bit of landmark. Here is a distant view of it from up on Huffman Hill..


    There are some industrial buildings on the south side of the historic district that are fairly tall and may offer good photographic vantage points, but are not open to the public. You really won't see much but tree top, perhaps a few roofs & turrets, and church steeples.

    #####################################

    Is there any significant development pressures for the area, or it is kind of in a holding pattern?
    No developement pressure, unless a buisness wants to expand and tear down an adjacent building for more parking. This is a declining area, losing population, and slowly being abandoned. Dayton generally does a good job w. demolition, so there are not too many derelict homes standing, but the place is thinning out.

    In terms of buisiness there is minimal retail. Second stores, that mexican market, a pawn shop. Also small non-retail buisness like a funeral home, check cashing service, auto mechanics, contractors, and so forth. But there are vacant buisnessess too.

    I'd say it hasn't completely collapsed, but on a gentle glide slope to abandonment and demolition. I think that red brick corner store building will probably end up being demolished over the next few years.

  5. #5

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    Except for Cincinatti and Chicago and a few others...midwestern cities seem so spread out, even the older neighborhoods. I'm used to things being increasingly crammed together. (High land costs)

    Thanks again for your exhaustive and unique views of your town!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally posted by BKM
    Except for Cincinatti and Chicago and a few others...midwestern cities seem so spread out, even the older neighborhoods. I'm used to things being increasingly crammed together. (High land costs)


    Thanks again for your exhaustive and unique views of your town!
    Oh your welcome...I really am discovering Dayton as I walk through these older neighborhoods, and then study up on their developement. I enjoy sharing this city with you all.

    There is one fairly dense neighborhood, the Oregon District, but it isn't really as dense as Cincinnati's older neighborhoods, like Over the Rhine. Oddly, though, it is older in terms of housing stock. Perhaps one of the older urban neighborhoods in Ohio that has survived.

    The interesting thing about Dayton, is that is a city of farmhouses..what cultural geographers call the "I house", but set gable end to the street so as to fit into narrow lots.

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