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Thread: Common Phrases We Collectively Understand and Take for Granted

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Common Phrases We Collectively Understand and Take for Granted

    Someone once told me the mechanotronic owl in the Clash of the Titans movie looked cheesy. Yeah, the FX look like crapola, but that Harry Hamlin sure is hot! I never tasted a mechanotronic owl, so I don't know if the flapper tastes like gouda or cheddar. Doesn't matter, I know, it's just a phrase.


    But why cheesy?

    Why not "oniony" or "gloompy-doompy"?

    Yoda sure looks "gloompy-doompy" in the "Phantom Menace," doesn't he?


    These guys sure look "oniony," don't they?

    Did someone just make-up cheesy, or is there a factual basis to its origin and colloquial meaning?

    Off-topic:
    EDIT Where did the pics go?


    Moderator note:
    sorry Wanigas?, I moved your pics from your gallery to the temp images gallery (where ALL NON-PLANNING images are supposed to reside) - when I checked the thread they were still visible to me but I guess my computer just had them cached or something. Sorry.
    Last edited by Tranplanner; 20 Apr 2005 at 7:57 AM. Reason: Pics restored

  2. #2
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    'kerfuffle' 'boinked' and 'kittywampus' (also regional variants 'caddywampus' and 'whomperjawed') all carry a certain instictive meaning. No one sat you down and explained what they meant, understanding occurred through its use in context.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    catty-cornered
    what in the sam hill?
    discombobulated

    They don't mean anything but we know what they mean.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess
    catty-cornered
    Comes from the French for four, quatre. As in the four corners created by a road intersection. When English speakers try to say quatre, it comes out funny, hence "catty-corner."

  5. #5
         
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess
    catty-cornered
    what in the sam hill?
    discombobulated

    They don't mean anything but we know what they mean.
    discombobulated isn't a real word
    I think "what in the name of sam hill" must be a southern thing, I have never said that am not sure I have heard it...wierd thing is I DO know what it means....

  6. #6
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
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    Cheesy.

    I imagine this can be traced back to saying "Cheese" when we get our photo's taken. One can assume that a forced, posed smile caused by the phrase "say cheese" results in a cheesy appearance. Cheesy meaning = awkward, unusual, or in an unatural way.

    Therefore, the owl apeared cheesy in the movie.

    anyone utilize "dadspeak" ? specifically the "I'll (whatever subject/object noun you just said to me) you."
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Don't forget the military offerings, including fubar .

    Remember, also fugly .

    & let's not forget our Canuckistickitian fans with eh? .

    Finally, appropriate today, Is the Pope Catholic? .

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  8. #8
    Cyburbian jmello's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Jaxspra
    discombobulated isn't a real word
    I think "what in the name of sam hill" must be a southern thing, I have never said that am not sure I have heard it...wierd thing is I DO know what it means....
    I always thought it was "what in Sam hell."

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    Quote Originally posted by jmello
    I always thought it was "what in Sam hell."
    Me too...and WTF does that really mean anyway?? I assume you could say it either way as neither one really means anything (at least not to me, I am sure they were derived from somewhere )

  10. #10
    Cyburbian GISgal's avatar
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    Anybody use the word kyped?

    As in, "That guy kyped my i-pod?" (stole)
    “I am not discouraged, because every wrong attempt discarded is another step forward.” - Thomas Edison

  11. #11
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Bear Up North

    Finally, appropriate today, Is the Pope Catholic? .

    Bear
    Or the Big Lebowski version: "Does the Pope &*^% in the woods?"
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  12. #12
    Gunfighter Mastiff's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Jaxspra
    Me too...and WTF does that really mean anyway?? I assume you could say it either way as neither one really means anything (at least not to me, I am sure they were derived from somewhere )

    From World Wide Words:

    [Q] “I have often heard in American movies and on television phrases like ‘What in the Sam Hill is going on?’ Or, ‘What the Sam Hill happened here?’ Or, some such exclamation. I have not been able to find the basis of this expression.”

    [A] There is a story sometimes told (for example in Edwin Mitchell’s Encyclopedia of American Politics in 1946) that one Colonel Samuel Hill of Guilford, Connecticut, would often run for political office at some point in the early nineteenth century but always without success. Hence, “to run like Sam Hill” or “go like Sam Hill”. The problem is that nobody has found any trace of this monumentally unsuccessful candidate.

    On the other hand, an article in the New England Magazine in December 1889 entitled Two Centuries and a Half in Guilford Connecticut mentioned that, “Between 1727 and 1752 Mr. Sam. Hill represented Guilford in forty-three out of forty-nine sessions of the Legislature, and when he was gathered to his fathers, his son Nathaniel reigned in his stead” and a footnote queried whether this might be the source of the “popular Connecticut adjuration to ‘Give ‘em Sam Hill’?” So the tale has long legs.

    The expression has been known since the late 1830s. Despite the story, it seems to be no more than a personalised euphemism for “hell”.

    Quote Originally posted by GISgal
    Anybody use the word kyped?

    As in, "That guy kyped my i-pod?" (stole)

    Definition: \Kipe\, n. [Cf. OE. kipen to catch, Icel. kippa to pull,
    snatch. Cf. {Kipper}.]
    An osier basket used for catching fish. [Prov. Eng.]
    Last edited by NHPlanner; 20 Apr 2005 at 8:51 PM.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    C'mon and get me you twist of fate
    I'm standing right here Mr. Destiny
    If you want to talk well then I'll relate
    If you don't so what cause you don't scare me

  13. #13
    Cyburbian sisterceleste's avatar
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    I have always hated the phrase "kill two birds with one stone". Does not sound very nice.
    You darn tootin', I like fig newtons!

  14. #14
    Gunfighter Mastiff's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Jaxspra
    discombobulated isn't a real word
    Tsk!


    Main Entry: dis·com·bob·u·late
    Pronunciation: "dis-k&m-'bä-b(y)&-"lAt
    Function: transitive verb
    Inflected Form(s): -lat·ed; -lat·ing
    Etymology: probably alteration of discompose
    : UPSET, CONFUSE <the offensive had discombobulated all the German defensive arrangements -- A. J. Liebling>

    Quote Originally posted by sisterceleste
    I have always hated the phrase "kill two birds with one stone". Does not sound very nice.

    They could be mean birds... one never knows.
    Last edited by NHPlanner; 20 Apr 2005 at 8:51 PM.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    C'mon and get me you twist of fate
    I'm standing right here Mr. Destiny
    If you want to talk well then I'll relate
    If you don't so what cause you don't scare me

  15. #15
         
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    Quote Originally posted by Mastiff
    Tsk!


    Main Entry: dis·com·bob·u·late
    Pronunciation: "dis-k&m-'bä-b(y)&-"lAt
    Function: transitive verb
    Inflected Form(s): -lat·ed; -lat·ing
    Etymology: probably alteration of discompose
    : UPSET, CONFUSE <the offensive had discombobulated all the German defensive arrangements -- A. J. Liebling>
    So it IS a real word!!

  16. #16
    Cyburbian Rumpy Tunanator's avatar
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    Don't hurt 'em Hammer....
    A guy once told me, "Do not have any attachments, do not have anything in your life you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you spot the heat around the corner."


    Neil McCauley (Robert DeNiro): Heat 1995

  17. #17
    Cyburbian jsk1983's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by boiker
    Cheesy.

    I imagine this can be traced back to saying "Cheese" when we get our photo's taken. One can assume that a forced, posed smile caused by the phrase "say cheese" results in a cheesy appearance. Cheesy meaning = awkward, unusual, or in an unatural way.
    In the Uk there is a category of music known as cheese. Its basically pop, alot of classic songs that have been played over and over despite their lack of musical quality. Something like YMCA or Britney Spears would fit this. Perhaps one of our British members can better explain it.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally posted by jsk1983
    In the Uk there is a category of music known as cheese. Its basically pop, alot of classic songs that have been played over and over despite their lack of musical quality. Something like YMCA or Britney Spears would fit this. Perhaps one of our British members can better explain it.
    I don't think I can add much more to that JSK, other than any type of music can be cheese, it all depends on the cheesy elements within the music. Its often applied to euro-dance music, but I would propose, for instance, that the music of 'The Darkness' is cheesy.

    Kyped is a new one for me. Some other words for 'stole' over here; nicked, pogged, half-inched.

  19. #19
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    just thought of a really dumb idiomatic expression: "make a killing"
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally posted by Jaxspra
    Me too...and WTF does that really mean anyway?? I assume you could say it either way as neither one really means anything (at least not to me, I am sure they were derived from somewhere )
    Sam Hill, Sam hell...

    Doesn't make a difference. Six in one hand, half-dozen in the other.

  21. #21
          mentarman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by pete-rock
    Sam Hill, Sam hell...

    Doesn't make a difference. Six in one hand, half-dozen in the other.
    lol never heard that. I've heard "Six of one, half a dozen of the other" to mean a choice that really won't make a difference. Or "Sixes" in its shortened form.

  22. #22
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    "Man Alive!!"

    Or the Simpson's take on it: "Man alive! There's men alive in here..."
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  23. #23
    Gunfighter Mastiff's avatar
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    Let's not forget the sports phrases people add to their lingo:

    Baseball:

    He hit that one out of the park.
    They sure threw me a curve...
    We're in the ballpark.
    I'll go to bat for you.
    Out in left field.
    Step up to the plate.
    Way off base.

    Basketball:

    It's a slam dunk.
    The ball is in your court.

    Football:

    Go the whole nine yards.
    What's the game plan?
    Take the ball and run!
    Make an end run.


    Golf

    Par for the course.
    He putts from the rough. (NTTAWWT)

    Boxing:

    Throw in the towel.
    Hit below the belt.
    Take it on the chin.

    Racing:

    Down to the wire.
    Neck and neck...
    Jockey for position.
    He's the dark horse.


    I know there are more...
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    C'mon and get me you twist of fate
    I'm standing right here Mr. Destiny
    If you want to talk well then I'll relate
    If you don't so what cause you don't scare me

  24. #24
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Mastiff
    Let's not forget the sports phrases people add to their lingo:

    Baseball:

    He hit that one out of the park.
    They sure threw me a curve...
    We're in the ballpark.
    I'll go to bat for you.
    Out in left field.
    Step up to the plate.
    Way off base.
    'I need a raincheck'

    Quote Originally posted by mastiff
    Basketball:

    It's a slam dunk.
    The ball is in your court.

    Football:

    Go the whole nine yards.
    Nope, comes from military combat, as in having a fighter pilot use his entire supply of automatic weapons ammo (they were in belts that were about 9 yards long). 'He shot the whole nine yards'.
    Quote Originally posted by mastiff
    What's the game plan?
    Take the ball and run!
    Make an end run.
    I would include phrases relating to punting. Also, 'He could go all the way!'.

    Quote Originally posted by mastiff
    Golf

    Par for the course.
    He putts from the rough. (NTTAWWT)
    I have heard quotes relating to 'Even a duffer nails one every now and then'.

    Quote Originally posted by mastiff
    Boxing:

    Throw in the towel.
    Hit below the belt.
    Take it on the chin.

    Racing:

    Down to the wire.
    Neck and neck...
    Jockey for position.
    He's the dark horse.
    'Upset' (was a real long-shot race horse that won a major race in the late 19th century)

    Mike

  25. #25
    Cyburbian jsk1983's avatar
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    "pardon my French"
    meaning excuse me for swearing. Why French? Why not pardon my Dutch?

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