Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Rooter: A Methodology for the Typical Unification of Access Points and Redundancy.

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    7,061

    Rooter: A Methodology for the Typical Unification of Access Points and Redundancy.

    Article posted in some forum I belong to:
    How gibberish put scientists to shame

    PAGES of computer-generated gibberish, containing such gems as “contrarily, the lookaside buffer might not be the panacea”, have been accepted as an academic paper at a scientific conference in the United States in a victory for hoaxers.
    They wrote a computer program to generate nonsensical research papers, complete with “context-free grammar”, charts and diagrams. The program randomly selects and assembles sentences, then drops in impressive-sounding verbs and nouns. “Many scholars would agree that, had it not been for active networks, the simulation of Lamport clocks might never have occurred,” the paper asserts in its introduction.

    Gee, it reminds me of that great gem about the evils of dihydrogen monoxide.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian jordanb's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    City of Low Low Wages!
    Posts
    3,236
    I used one of those programs to write lab reports in my Chemistry class. The TA didn't read them anyway.

  3. #3
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 1996
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    14,537
    Blog entries
    3
    Once again, I think a link to the Postmodernism Generator is in order.

    Expressionism in the works of Glass
    David McElwaine
    Department of Future Studies, University of California

    1. Narratives of genre

    If one examines expressionism, one is faced with a choice: either accept conceptualist nationalism or conclude that consensus must come from the collective unconscious, given that the premise of expressionism is invalid. A number of discourses concerning the presemiotic paradigm of consensus exist.

    "Truth is part of the absurdity of reality," says Sontag; however, according to Scuglia[1] , it is not so much truth that is part of the absurdity of reality, but rather the genre of truth. Therefore, if expressionism holds, we have to choose between the presemiotic paradigm of consensus and neocapitalist desituationism. The absurdity, and therefore the paradigm, of dialectic posttextual theory prevalent in Smith's Clerks emerges again in Chasing Amy, although in a more self-referential sense.

    The primary theme of the works of Smith is the failure, and some would say the paradigm, of capitalist society. However, Marx promotes the use of expressionism to challenge hierarchy. McElwaine[2] holds that the works of Smith are reminiscent of Spelling.

    [snip]

    1. Scuglia, M. D. T. ed. (1970) The Futility of Expression: The presemiotic paradigm of consensus and expressionism. Loompanics

    2. McElwaine, P. F. (1989) The presemiotic paradigm of consensus in the works of Joyce. Panic Button Books

    [snip]
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  4. #4
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Staff meeting
    Posts
    8,165
    So....as the world and technology advances, the more absurd and sarcastic we become.
    Last edited by mendelman; 27 Apr 2005 at 4:12 PM.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Duke Of Dystopia's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Cyburbias Brewpub, best seat in the haus!
    Posts
    2,669
    Quote Originally posted by mendelman
    So....as the world and technology advances, the more absurd and sarcastic we become.
    This is surprising?
    I can't deliver UTOPIA, but I can create a HELL for you to LIVE in :)DoD:(

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    7,061
    I think it has a deeper significance than mere sarcasm and absurdity. I think it is great commentary on the importance of a real education and the ability to think critically and ask the right questions and not get baffled by bullsh*t. We address issues like that in this forum in threads about de-jargonizing the profession, etc. (And no I don't feel like finding that thread. )

    I hang out in forums for gifted folks. I originally joined one such forum about 6 1/2 years ago. Such forums are full of folks who can quote obscure statistics and factoids all day long, many of whom have been to Harvard (et al) and/or have Master's or Ph.d's. I continually amazes me that, often, these folks get mired in battles of the egos that they THINK are battles of wits, where no one is really asking the Right question but all of them are trying to prove they have The Answer. Early on, the culture in such forums was very much the high school "who can be the biggest egomaniac and most obnoxious know-it-all" format. My tendency to think outside the box and ask other questions regularly got me in hot water. As the culture matured and as my ability to be diplomatic increased and I learned to not take excess glee in busting the chops of a Harvard educated Ph.d. , the conversations there changed. One such forum has definitely turned into a place where differing opinions can be politely expressed and where it is acceptable and encouraged to ask questions that grow out of different majors and careers in order to add depth to the discussion. Six and a half years ago, that wasn't really possible.

    A LOT of professions have fairly narrow educations and ask questions from a limited point of view and feel the need to protect their territory with high-falutin jargon, etc. In my opinion, people who actually think are right to occasionally go in and prove that the emperor has no clothes. Sometimes doing so in a goofball way is the only way to do so safely. If you have a Serious theory to confront them with, you might end up in jail -- like Galileo.

  7. #7
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Staff meeting
    Posts
    8,165
    Nicely put MZ.

    I agree with you, and I still like the "gotcha" effect they had. It was like my recent disposal of my teenage boy obession with cars and car culture. During my second year of grad school (Planning school, that is), I saw that it was silly and now treat cars, mostly, as more of an appliance than a fashion accessory.

    I love those generators.
    Last edited by mendelman; 27 Apr 2005 at 4:09 PM.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian jordanb's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    City of Low Low Wages!
    Posts
    3,236
    Interestingly, I was looking up the professors I'll be having next semester, and I found that I'll be taking a class with this guy.

    Here is an interview about his book Clueless in Academe: How Schooling Obscures the Life of the Mind: http://www.themorningnews.org/archiv...rald_graff.php

    And some good quotes:

    Some of course would say that ‘our issues’ are so narrow, specialized, and arid, not to mention vacuous to boot, and that ‘our talk’ is so turgid and jargon-ridden, that it’s all the better that students not understand them! After all, the point is not to produce clones of dry-as-dust academics but broadly educated citizens. And it’s true, as I acknowledge in the book, that it makes a big difference how we define ‘our issues’ and ‘our talk,’ and I spend many pages trying to distinguish the better forms of talk – the ones that would provide good models for students – from the worst ones.
    I wish the quality of political debate in this country was anywhere near as good as the debates on sports talk radio about whether the Cubs should trade or hang on to Sammy Sosa (clearly they should hang on – and I wrote that, mind you, before he hit a ton of homeruns in July and August!). As for noise, that’s simply what critical thinkers learn how to penetrate, make sense of, and deflect for their own purposes, it seems to me.
    Here’s what I’d like to do some day and may get a chance to do soon: Take five sections of freshman composition at a university and teach them using the ‘argument templates’ discussed extensively in Clueless and other methods for demystifying academic culture. Closely monitor the writing done by the students over the course of the semester or year, and compare their work with that produced by a randomly-chosen control group of a different five sections of the same course. I like to think the results would dramatically bear out my claims. If they didn’t it would be back to the drawing-board for me. But it’s symptomatic of the incuriosity of higher education about what students actually get out of college that one never hears about such experiments even being tried.
    Needless to say, the book is on my reading list. And I'm looking forward to the class.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    7,061
    Quote Originally posted by mendelman
    Nicely put MZ.

    I agree with you, and I still like the "gotcha" effect they had.
    Thank you. I love a good "gotcha". Shhhh. Don't tell anyone as it really f***s up my attempts to be all diplomatic, respectful of all humanity, and so forth. Sigh. One of my Achille's Heels. (But I'm not TOO sorry, actually. )

    Jordon, here is the quote presently in my e-mail signature block:
    It is not so very important for a person to learn facts. For that he does not really need a college. He can learn them from books. The value of an education in a liberal arts college is not learning of many facts but the training of the mind to think something that cannot be learned from textbooks.
    -Albert Einstein
    Previously, I had this quote:
    “Problems cannot be solved at the same level of awareness that created them.”
    – Albert Einstein.
    Someone on a homeschooling list quoted a substantive amount of text from something of Einstein's that most folks haven't heard about because it isn't about physics, it is his opinions about education (among other things). And, these days, there is John Holt and his publisher Dr. David...um,,,,what is his last name? Dr. David Albert, author of "And the skylark sings with me" (or some such) and other homeschooling books. He would like to see the public school system dismantled.

    I get to listen to this stuff regularly -- quotes of statistics about how literacy rates went DOWN when public education became mandatory. Below are excerpts from something a friend wrote (that I intend to put on my website at some point, with her permission):

    *The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently. Friedrich Nietzsche*
    *Our schools have become vast factories for the manufacture of robots. We no longer send our young to them primarily to be taught and given the tools of thought, no longer primarily to be informed and acquire knowledge; but to be "socialized" -- which in the current semantic means to be regimented and made to conform.

    Robert Lindner, psychoanalyst in Must You Conform? (1956) *
    *Universal education is the most corroding and disintegrating poison that liberalism has ever invented for its own destruction.

    Adolf Hitler *
    In case you hadn't noticed, when I am not running my mouth here, I run it a lot in homeschooling forums. This is a side of me that doesn't get expressed as much here. Sorry if you feel like you have had an anvil dropped on you.

  10. #10

    Registered
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Solano County, California
    Posts
    6,468
    Eliminating public education would lower my taxes. I'm all for it

    Butterflies and Wheels dissects academic nonsense all the time. A very enjoyable site.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    7,061
    Quote Originally posted by BKM
    Eliminating public education would lower my taxes. I'm all for it
    Oh, I'm not advocating for the elimination of public education. I just know people who say stuff like that. I am advocating for critical thinking and such.

    I may have to look up the website you mentioned... but not now. Maybe later.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian jordanb's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    City of Low Low Wages!
    Posts
    3,236
    Creativity and individualism do seem to be highly prized in our society (although not well rewarded). I'm not convinced that that's such a good thing though. And in particular I'm not convinced that our schools' teaching structure and discipline is such a bad thing.

    But I don't think that's necessarily Gaff's point, as he's talking strictly about college (and maybe some high school) and he's not complaining about the structure of the curriculum but rather the inability of professors to make that curriculum engaging and accessible to the students so that they can use the analysis techniques employed by academics in their everyday lives.

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    7,061
    Quote Originally posted by jordanb
    Creativity and individualism do seem to be highly prized in our society (although not well rewarded). I'm not convinced that that's such a good thing though. And in particular I'm not convinced that our schools' teaching structure and discipline is such a bad thing.

    But I don't think that's necessarily Gaff's point, as he's talking strictly about college (and maybe some high school) and he's not complaining about the structure of the curriculum but rather the inability of professors to make that curriculum engaging and accessible to the students so that they can use the analysis techniques employed by academics in their everyday lives.
    A) Again, I am not advocating the dismantling of the school system. I grabbed a few quotes that were readily available to me. Except for Hitler's quote, I don't think any of them necessarily are anti-school, merely pro-critical thinking.

    B) I know folks who would say basically that "the medium is the message" -- i.e. that you cannot teach anything but regimented thinking in schools whose structure requires regimentation.

    I don't have the time to argue it and I don't much care to argue it. My intent was merely to offer you some additional sources along those same lines, not bash this individual you look up to or whatever you are taking it as. However, schools do tend to "teach to the test" and teachers who try to do something more engaging and accessible are often intentionally crushed in their efforts and/or they leave. There is good evidence that the more top-down the system has become, the worse the actual education of the students has become.

  14. #14
    Cyburbian jordanb's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    City of Low Low Wages!
    Posts
    3,236
    I didn't take your post as a bash at all. I was just trying to clarify Professor Gaff's position. (Those quotes I posted were all from the article, btw).

    I think my point was more or less that I don't think "regimented thinking" is necessarily a bad thing. And I don't think thinking in a regimented manner and thinking critically are necessarily different things. "Thinking outside the box" is a cliché in our society, and in practice I think that causes more problems than it causes. Modernism itself could be seen to a large extent as a near fanatic obsession with novelty and originality.

    Interestingly the critical methods that Gaff is talking about, the ones that he wishes to give students, are pretty regimented. It's just that they're thought out well enough to be very good at being applied to a large variety of situations.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    7,061
    Hey, Jordon, I am really tired and was just trying to clarify as briefly as possible before I left the house. I don't know that I will have time to try to really address this again. I am just swamped at the moment. Your comments just made me think you might sometime enjoy some of the thoughts of others, like Einstein, that are in the same vein and which some folks aren't aware exist. That's all.

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Household redundancy
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 30
    Last post: 26 Jan 2012, 7:26 PM
  2. Eating methodology
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 14
    Last post: 10 Nov 2010, 12:18 PM
  3. Replies: 5
    Last post: 21 Aug 2006, 3:31 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last post: 12 Jul 2000, 1:52 PM
  5. Access points for multi-family
    Transportation Planning
    Replies: 0
    Last post: 18 Sep 1996, 4:47 PM