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Thread: Urban texture...I love it (Broadband!!)

  1. #1

    Urban texture...I love it (Broadband!!)

    I am interested in urban texture. The stuff that fills up the city. Not the skyline but the stuff that leads up to the skyline. I love the messy jumbly stuff that the real city is made of. No post cards here!

    I will start of with some stuff I found on the web showing Buffalo's urban texture.

    Show us your city if you like.

    ( these are images are not by me. they are form the web and might be copyrighted. please treat them as if they are)

    Urban Texture Buffalo













































    Last edited by steel; 08 May 2005 at 11:55 PM.

  2. #2
    Member
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    No postcards? Seems some of these are a bit postcardesque....

    Buffalo seems at once larger and smaller than I thought....

  3. #3
    I thought that planners would have more to say about this. Perhaps texture is too messy for planners. Not enough order? Need everything in its place?

  4. #4
    Cyburbian boilerplater's avatar
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    Well, the 2nd to last pic shows two buildings that don't make very good neighbors. The brick box with the uniform windows is a real scene killer. I imagine the older building with the standing seam metal roof once had more space around it and so was more of a focal point.

    On my one trip to Buffalo about 10 years ago, I found the downtown strangely empty on a weekday summer evening. Was kind of depressing. Found some life in a Brewpub on the edge of town and had a sandwich on that cummerwheck bread they tout there.
    Adrift in a sea of beige

  5. #5
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by steel
    I thought that planners would have more to say about this. Perhaps texture is too messy for planners. Not enough order? Need everything in its place?
    Alright....I'll bite.

    Perhaps you're a little hostile with this tone.

    The texture or form you show of Buffalo is interesting, but not terribly unique in the US. It looks like most other mid-size industrial cities in the Great Lakes region.

    My favorite urban texture or form, so far, it Chicago's oldtown neighborhood. It's grid is broken and it is a relatively small area. Some of the streets are narrow (approx. 30 feet wide), which helps to create an intimate setting, but two blcks and you're at the intersection of Wells and North - a strong urban small-scale commercial corridor.

    Last edited by mendelman; 23 May 2005 at 10:31 AM.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

    Six seasons and a movie!

  6. #6
    Steel, post some comments with your pics, why it's fascinating, why people like it, does it work and why, who's responsible for failures and success, etc...

    in short, pimp that sh*t.

    I like high rises (New York City is amazing) as long as there are mid and low rises too.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally posted by mendelman
    Alright....I'll bite.

    Perhaps you're a little hostile with this tone.

    The texture or form you show of Buffalo is interesting, but not terribly unique in the US. It looks like most other mid-size industrial cities in the Great Lakes region.

    My favorite urban texture or form, so far, it Chicago's oldtown neighborhood. It's grid is broken and it is a relatively small area. Some of the streets are narrow (approx. 30 feet wide), which helps to create an intimate setting, but two blcks and you're at the intersection of Wells and North - a strong urban small-scale commercial corridor.
    You planners are a bit tightly wound. My comment is meant as a friendly poke. Thanks for your comments though

    I don't mean this as a discussion focused on Buffalo only. I had these pics of Buffalo that illustrated the jumbly nature of cities that makes them both beautiful and ugly at the same time. Buffalo is a good example of this

    This picture was commented on by someone. It shows a very beautiful large mansion designed by McKim Mead and White in the 1890's The parking to the left was carved out of its gardens. The bland building to the north replaces what was another mansion. The street is still a very nice but has been degraded by these changes.



    Here is a new texture shot of Buffalo. It shows the east side. In the forground is a formerly prosperous neighborhood. If you look closely you can see signs of thining of buildings on the streets. The highway was plowed thru an Olmstead designed parkway. In the backround you see industrial structures poking up. These industrials are interesting because industrial buildings are almost never built more than 1 story tall these days. There are many stories in these texture pictures.



    I like cities that are bumpy. As you noted Old Town is up against a small high rise cluster that forms a great backdrop and sense of enclosure to the neighborhood. Too many people have a knee jerk reaction to high-rise buildings or over sized buildings as if they are inherently bad for a neighborhood (not that they can't ruin a place also but that could be from plain bad architecture too)

    some bumpy Buffalo

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