Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Bicycle level of service

  1. #1
    Cyburbian ChevyChaseDC's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    190

    Bicycle level of service

    I'm analyzing bicycle level of service (BLOS) using secondary data. We have some, but are missing a lot of figures such as kd ratio, directional split, speed limit, pavement condition, etc. This study is relatively minor so actually going into the field, taking measurements, and doing counts is out of the question. I've seen assumed values for volume (12,000 adt), pavement condition (4.0 on scale of 1 to 5), percent heavy vehicles (2%), speed limit (40),

    Does anyone know if there are standard assumed values for kd ratio and directional split? I think but am not certain that kd ratio is .10 and directional split is just .5...

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    maudit anglais
    Registered
    May 1997
    Location
    Odd-a-wah
    Posts
    6,586
    Arrrgh...I can't find my tech manual right now. I hope someone else out there has the answer. In the meantine, I will keep looking when I get the chance.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian ChevyChaseDC's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    190
    Thanks to anyone who tried and was stumped. Turns out the answers are: KD Ratio is 0.10; directional split is 0.565.

    I don't understand though why it's 0.565 and not just .5...

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Rumpy Tunanator's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Intervention
    Posts
    4,475
    Don't know if this will help.

    http://www.dot.state.fl.us/planning/...2002Novweb.pdf

    BICYCLE LOS MODEL
    For bicycle Q/LOS, the FDOT has concluded that the Bicycle LOS
    Model, developed by Sprinkle Consulting Inc. (SCI), is the best
    analytical methodology. It is technically sound, superior for
    Florida applications compared with other approaches including
    the one appearing in the HCM, and has been successfully applied
    to over 100,000 miles of roadways in the U.S (including Florida)
    and Canada. Because it is an operational model, FDOT, in
    cooperation with the model developers, have made some
    simplifying assumptions for incorporation into this Handbook
    and accompanying software.
    In the Bicycle LOS Model, bicycle levels of service are based on
    five variables with relative importance (T statistic) ordered in the
    following list:
    • average effective width of the outside through lane,
    • motorized vehicle volumes,
    • motorized vehicle speeds,
    • heavy vehicle (truck) volumes, and
    • pavement condition.
    Q/LOS Evaluation Techniques Bicycle LOS Model 2.2
    FDOT Quality/Level of Service Handbook 18
    Average effective width is largely determined by the width of the
    outside travel lane and striping for bicyclists, but also includes
    other factors such as the effects of street parking and drainage
    grates. Each of the variables is weighted by coefficients derived by
    stepwise regression modeling importance. A numerical LOS
    score, generally ranging from 0.5 to 6.5, is determined and
    stratified to a LOS letter grade. Thus, unlike the determination of
    automobile LOS in the HCM2000, in which there is usually only
    one service measure (e.g., average travel speed), bicycle LOS is
    determined based on multiple factors. In the Bicycle LOS Model,
    bicycle levels of service are determined using the following
    equation and then applying the level of service thresholds (see
    Table 2-1) to the calculated scores.
    Bicycle LOS Model equation
    The Bicycle LOS Model is based on the following equation:
    BLOS = 0.507 ln (Vol15/L) + 0.199SPt(1+10.38HV)2
    +7.066(1/PR5)2-0.005(We)2+ 0.760
    Where:
    BLOS = Bicycle level of service score
    ln = Natural log
    Vol15 = Volume of directional motorized vehicles in the peak 15
    minute time period
    L = Total number of directional through lanes
    SPt = Effective speed factor = 1.1199 In(SPp - 20) + 0.8103
    SPp = Posted speed limit (a surrogate for average running
    speed)
    HV = percentage of heavy vehicles
    PR5 = FHWA’s five point pavement surface condition rating
    We = Average effective width of outside through lane
    Where:
    We = Wv - (10ft x %OSP) Where W1 = 0
    We = Wv + W1(1 - 2x %OSP) Where W1 > 0 & Wps = 0
    We = Wv + W1 - 2 (10 x %OSP) Where W1 > 0 & Wps > 0
    and a bicycle lane exists
    Where:
    Wt = total width of outside lane (and shoulder)
    pavement
    %OSP = percentage of segment with occupied on-street parking
    W1 = width of paving between the outside lane stripe
    and the edge of pavement
    Wps = width of pavement striped for on-street parking
    Wv = Effective width as a function of traffic volume
    Q/LOS Evaluation Techniques Bicycle LOS Model 2.2
    FDOT Quality/Level of Service Handbook 19
    Many Bicycle LOS Model
    mathematical terms are
    also HCM2000 motorized
    vehicle terms.
    Where:
    Wv = Wt if AADT > 4,000 veh/day
    Wv = Wt(2-(0.00025 x AADT)) if AADT < 4,000 veh/day,
    and if the street/road is
    undivided and striped
    Table 2 – 1
    BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN LEVEL OF SERVICE
    CATEGORIES
    Level of Service Score
    A < 1.5
    B > 1.5 and < 2.5
    C > 2.5 and < 3.5
    D > 3.5 and < 4.5
    E > 4.5 and < 5.5
    F > 5.5
    Noteworthy, many of the factors in the Bicycle LOS Model
    equation are also used to determine automobile LOS in the
    HCM2000 methodology, and are either logarithmic or
    exponential functions. Logarithmic and exponential functions
    make the importance of the variables differ significantly
    depending on the precise value. For example, the bicycle LOS
    drops dramatically as motorized vehicle volumes initially rise, but
    then tends to deteriorate more slowly at higher volumes. Another
    example is the effect of motorized vehicle speed. At low speeds,
    the variable is not as significant in determining bicycle LOS, but
    at higher speeds it plays an ever increasing role.
    Bicycle LOS Model is not
    applicable to off-street
    facilities.
    Bicycle Q/LOS is based on bicyclists’ perceptions in the roadway
    environment, specifically on the roadway cross section. The
    model is not applicable to off-street facilities, such as shared use
    paths or sidewalks. Analysts are encouraged to use discretion
    when assigning a bicycle LOS to a roadway when shared use
    paths exist. For example, if an outstanding path with few
    intersection conflicts (e.g. Pinellas Trail, a facility along a
    causeway) exists immediately adjacent to a roadway whose onstreet
    bicycle LOS is D, it is appropriate for the analyst to
    acknowledge a better quality of service for bicyclists than
    ARTPLAN produces.
    A guy once told me, "Do not have any attachments, do not have anything in your life you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you spot the heat around the corner."


    Neil McCauley (Robert DeNiro): Heat 1995

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
    Registered
    Sep 1999
    Location
    400 miles from Orlando
    Posts
    13,779
    Yeah, Rumpy, FDOT's stupid LOS don't support off-road facilities at all. Just what our BPAC leader prefers (commuter lanes). Makes it impossible for trails to be at all competitive for funding.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Rumpy Tunanator's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Intervention
    Posts
    4,475
    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess
    Yeah, Rumpy, FDOT's stupid LOS don't support off-road facilities at all. Just what our BPAC leader prefers (commuter lanes). Makes it impossible for trails to be at all competitive for funding.
    Like I mentioned, I don't know if it will help.

    But who is going want trails running behind their property? They just lead to crime and other bad things
    A guy once told me, "Do not have any attachments, do not have anything in your life you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you spot the heat around the corner."


    Neil McCauley (Robert DeNiro): Heat 1995

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 7
    Last post: 02 Nov 2005, 5:32 PM
  2. Replies: 7
    Last post: 15 Apr 2005, 5:56 PM
  3. Replies: 9
    Last post: 11 Mar 2005, 11:06 PM
  4. Boat level-of-service
    Transportation Planning
    Replies: 6
    Last post: 21 Sep 2004, 6:29 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last post: 08 Mar 1998, 11:55 PM