Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Decline in housing units in an area

  1. #1
         
    Registered
    May 2005
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    2

    Decline in housing units in an area

    Hello all,
    I have a simple question....What can be various reasons for the decline in housing units...Im doing a study for an inner city neighborhood.
    Current neighborhood conditions are declining population, high unemployment, low median income levels.
    What typically happens to housing structures when people leave the area over a 20 yr period.
    There are no public housing projects or significant demolitions by local CDC to explain the decline in housing units.
    So what other causes might there be?

    Replies will be deeply appreciated
    Thanks
    Solomon

  2. #2
    Is it within a zone-in-transition? Perhaps from housing to industrial or commercial?
    Could it be reconversion of larger historic homes from multiples to single-family? How large of a number are we talking about?
    On pitching to Stan Musial:
    "Once he timed your fastball, your infielders were in jeopardy."
    Warren Spahn

  3. #3
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Dec 2001
    Location
    America's Dairyland
    Posts
    73
    one typical pattern is that absentee landlords buy properties and do little-to-no maintenance. eventually the homes get to a point where the cost of necessary repairs is not warranted because the housing values in the neighborhood have declined so much due to neglect and/or social conditions. over time more and more houses are boarded up and torn down. renters and homeowner with options also migrate away from the worst areas making it harder for landlords to find tenants for these neglected properties, also contributing to the cycle of decline. this thinning out of central city population densities is pretty well documented and you should be able to find a lot of info on the web.

  4. #4
    Yep. Abandoned houses also become crime magnets, as they're used as crackhouses and flophouses by neighborhood vagrants and drug addicts, so owners frequently see demolition as the only option. Demolition is also often far cheaper than trying to bring neglected buildings up to code or livable condition for actual use.

    In a perfect world it'd be illegal to let buildings get into such bad shape, but most cities are still very slumlord-friendly.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian RandomPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dibs on the Northeast
    Posts
    664
    Quote Originally posted by indigo
    one typical pattern is that absentee landlords buy properties and do little-to-no maintenance. eventually the homes get to a point where the cost of necessary repairs is not warranted because the housing values in the neighborhood have declined so much due to neglect and/or social conditions. over time more and more houses are boarded up and torn down. renters and homeowner with options also migrate away from the worst areas making it harder for landlords to find tenants for these neglected properties, also contributing to the cycle of decline.
    agreed. The single most reason in my area for decline of residential areas is absentee landlordism!! A lot of these folks are looking to make money and are not concerned with the upkeep of their property. The lower rents allow for lower income residents, who don't have the money to help maintain the house and often have a "it's not my house" attitude, plus the fact that renters (myself included) don't feel the need to do repair work on a home that they don't own. If the owner won't maintain the house, the residents often use a this-will-work-for-now fix-it solution or trash the house before they move on to something else.
    Sadly, the cost often outweighs the desire of repairs, and ... some people just don't care.
    How do I know you are who you think you are?

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Land use: general Urban decline zone (AIB Kingmak)
    Land Use and Zoning
    Replies: 5
    Last post: 22 Jan 2013, 7:11 PM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last post: 25 Mar 2008, 7:38 PM
  3. Replies: 27
    Last post: 07 Feb 2007, 7:59 PM
  4. Replies: 5
    Last post: 23 Sep 2003, 1:08 PM
  5. Granny units and infill housing
    Make No Small Plans
    Replies: 2
    Last post: 09 Aug 2001, 9:59 AM