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Thread: Michigan Site Plan Reviewers in the Emerald Ash Borer Quarantine Areas

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Michigan Site Plan Reviewers in the Emerald Ash Borer Quarantine Areas

    How many of you in the quarantine areas are asking applicants to revise their landscaping plans if any member of the Fraxinus species is included? I just started asking applicants to exclude any ash trees on their plans. The plans I review are located in quarantine areas. Here's what I recently wrote:

    The revised landscaping plan shows a total of ten ash trees. In December of 2004, the Michigan Department of Agriculture (MDA) designated the entirety of the County as an Emerald Ash Borer quarantine area. All ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) are considered Regulated Articles, and according the MDA website (http://www.michigan.gov/mda/0,1607,7-125-1572_3628-107048--,00.html):
    Under the quarantine, it is illegal to move ash trees, branches, untreated lumber, deciduous firewood and any other materials from these areas unless chipped to one inch or smaller. Additionally, the movement of all ash nursery stock is prohibited within, into, and from the entire Lower Peninsula.
    Under these circumstances, it is imperative the applicant revise the landscape plan to exclude all ash trees.
    How extensive is your review of these issues in your staff report?

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    I'm not a big fan of bumping threads, but...

    Anyone out there deal with the Emrald Ash Borer or other invasive species?



    Hello?!



    Anyone?

    Maybe this should be turned into a broader-themed thread for all planners in North America who, in their staff reports, are interested in addressing the threats of invasive species?


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    Cyburbian SW MI Planner's avatar
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    I assume you are talking about new site plans - if they include Ash we just tell them to pick something else, and revise the plan to indicate another tree. It hasn't been a problem, but if they fail to pick another tree then either I won't send it to Planning Commission or I recommend it gets denied.

    If your talking about plans already approved, we do nothing. Since I have been here (5 years) we haven't had anyone propose any Ash trees.

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    Cyburbian PlannerByDay's avatar
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    I'm in Michigan and live outside the quarantine area. I have done some site plan reviews for communities in quarantine zones but have not had any with ash trees on them. Most of the trees are decorative like crab apple or pear trees.

    I suppose if I saw an ash tree I would recommend that they change it. Similar to what SW MI Planner suggested.

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    Cyburbian PlannerByDay's avatar
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    Check this out.

    When I came home for lunch I found this in my front yard





    According to THIS website the tree is a test tree to see of the ash bore is in the areas. Also according to the website EAB Test Tree Map there are 9 test trees per township in my county and WHOO HOOO I have one of the.

    I plan on checking the tree to see if the little bugger is in my neighborhood.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by PlannerByDay
    I plan on checking the tree to see if the little bugger is in my neighborhood.
    This is interesting. How did you get so lucky?!

    Good luck finding an adult EAB. Wouldn't you more likely find larvae and their signature tunnels underneath the bark?

    That would suck if they were there and you had to remove your ash trees.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian PlannerByDay's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Wanigas?
    Good luck finding an adult EAB. Wouldn't you more likely find larvae and their signature tunnels underneath the bark?
    According the the website it states that
    "snip.... An EAB detection tree is an ash tree with a section of the bark removed from the lower trunk and a layer of tanglefoot (a very sticky, waxy substance) applies to the trunk above the area of removed bark." snip " This injury makes the detection tree more attractive to female beetles looking for a place to lay eggs. An EAB adult comeing in contact with the tanglefoot becomes trapped. The traps will be monitored to determine if the EAB is present in area."

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    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Hey folks, it's Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week in Michigan. Who'd'a thunk it?

    As spring approaches and your family makes Memorial Day travel preparations, I ask that you follow the guidelines in Michigan's Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) quarantine prohibiting the movement of all hardwood firewood. In an effort to increase public understanding and awareness of this exotic beetle, I have declared the week of May 22, "Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week."

    The Emerald Ash Borer, an invasive insect native to Asia, attacks ash trees in the larval stage, feeding undetected under the bark, disrupting water and nutrient flow, eventually killing the tree. With the EAB adult smaller than a penny, and the larvae well hidden under the tree bark, this hitchhiker has traveled undetected across our state in firewood, nursery stock, and other ash materials to create new outlying areas of infestation.

    Michigan is home to 700 million ash trees. An estimated 15 million of these trees are already dead or dying due to EAB infestations in southeast counties. With the rest of the state at risk, it has become increasingly critical that we all do our part to protect and preserve this valuable resource. Since the discovery of EAB in 2002, Michigan has launched an aggressive campaign to contain and manage this destructive pest.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian PlannerByDay's avatar
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    And on a related note

    Michigan Proclaims Aquatic Invasive Species Awareness Week

    In a continued effort to raise public awareness about the negative impacts caused by aquatic invasive species, Governor Jennifer M. Granholm has declared June 4 - 12, 2005 as Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Awareness Week. Michigan's expansive shorelines and inland waters draw millions of tourists and recreational users to take in the beauty of the state's natural resources, and it is critical that all of those who enjoy the use of our waters do their part to help protect them.

    Recreational users should demonstrate caution while enjoying Michigan's vast water resources this summer. A few simple preventative measures can help protect Michigan's pristine waters from AIS invasions, for example, watercrafts and recreational equipment should be inspected before leaving a lake, any vegetation should be removed, all live wells drained, areas that may contain water cleaned, and unused bait should be disposed in the trash.

    An aquatic invasive species is defined as a waterborne, non-native organism that threatens the diversity or abundance of native species, the ecological stability of impacted waters, or threatens a commercial, agricultural, aquacultural, or recreational activity.

    AIS not only impact the use of Michigan's waters but have negative impacts on sport and commercial fishing, various industries, and native fish and wildlife. While enjoying Michigan waters this summer, please help protect our waters. To learn more about specific steps that can be taken to prevent the introduction and spread of AIS visit http://www.protectyourwaters.net.

    The third annual AIS week is sponsored by the Department of Environmental Quality's Office of the Great Lakes with collaborative efforts from other state and federal agencies, as well as private and nonprofit organizations. For AIS Awareness Week information, the Governor's proclamation, event listings, activities, and more, visit the DEQ's Aquatic Invasive Species website at www.michigan.gov/deqaquaticinvasives; or call the Office of the Great Lakes at 517 335 4056.

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