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Thread: Lot width / frontage questionnaire

  1. #1
    Cyburbian nerudite's avatar
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    Lot width / frontage questionnaire

    I'm currently the project manager of a Land Use Bylaw (Zoning Ordinance) review that is going forward to Council next month. One of the more controversial requests from the development community is to allow for smaller single detached family lots. I've done a survey of Alberta municipalities already, and the lot widths/frontages are incredibly small compared to what I remember lot sizes being in the States.

    So more out of curiosity than anything, I'd love to poll my fellow Cyburbians to find out the following:

    1) What is the minimum lot width/frontage requirement for your typical single family detached lot?

    2) What is the type of community and size (i.e. suburb w/ 50,000 persons, large city with 1M persons, rural county, etc.)

    3) When were the regulations last updated?



    My answers (just in case you are interested):

    1) 11.5 m/38 ft (contemplating as low as 10 m/33 ft, developers want 8.6 m/28.2 ft)
    2) Suburb of 55,000
    3) 1994

  2. #2
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    70 feet wide (for new lots); buildable lots can be down to 50 feet wide/6,250 sqft
    suburb of 75,000
    several decades
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

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  3. #3
         
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    Rural/Recreational County

    Residential Districts (3 2 single family, 1 multiple family) require an average lot width of 200 feet/150 feet/100 feet (unless there is a community wastewater or water system then 125 feet/125 feet/100 feet). Minimum lot width is 50 feet to account for cul-de-sacs.

    Last complete rewrite finished in March of 2004.

  4. #4
    Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator NHPlanner's avatar
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    my numbers won't help much....:

    1) 150' of frontage for a single family, 200' for a duplex.

    2) suburban community of 25K

    3) Frontage requirements haven't been changed since the 1970's.
    "Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change. The question is how." -- Edward T. McMahon, The Conservation Fund

  5. #5
         
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    1) 37.5 feet
    2) Small City - 8,000
    3) 2001

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Plus Whose Yur Planner's avatar
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    Our is based on zoning district. The AG districts have a higher requirements, the residential has lower. Plus, the higher the density, the smaller the width. Finally, we have a road frontage requirement and a maximum lot depth requirement.

    I work for a county of 130,000 that this a mix of ag and suburbs. The current Ordinance was adopted in 2002.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian SGB's avatar
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    Minimum lot width for a SFR district is 75 feet.

    Suburban/Rural community of +28,0000

    Zoning code last updated in 2002.
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    He did not know he could not fly, so he did.
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  8. #8
    Small City (suburb of major metropolitan area)
    40,000 population
    60' street frontage (lot area of 7,200 sq. ft)
    2002

    We have lots that may be developed as of right for single-family as small as 18x100 BUT they must have been of record prior to 1958.

    We are most commonly seeing developers wanting to reduce the 60' frontage to 50'.
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  9. #9
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    Suburban Community
    Pop = 300 K
    Minimum for a SUD = 12 m

    We go as low as 7.5 m for each semidetatched and as high as 45 m for Rural Residential, plus we have lots of exceptions.
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  10. #10
    Cyburbian nerudite's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by donk
    Suburban Community
    Pop = 300 K
    Minimum for a SUD = 12 m

    We go as low as 7.5 m for each semidetatched and as high as 45 m for Rural Residential, plus we have lots of exceptions.
    Just wondering... when was your bylaw updated last? Just trying to assess who has tried to implement smaller lots due to smart growth, etc. Thanks!

  11. #11
    Cyburbian
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    40' for a single-family, 80' for a double
    City of 1 million, more or less
    Last updated 1998
    I don't dream. I plan.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian abrowne's avatar
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    Goodness these are wide frontage minimums...

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Plus Salmissra's avatar
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    And now for something very different . . .

    -4th largest city in the US
    -NO ZONING
    -Development code last updated in 1999, with some "tweaking" currently at the legal department's desk

    - 20 feet minimum lot frontage on a street
    - 3,500 sq ft minimum lot size in Urban area (defined as inside Loop 610)
    - 5,000 sq ft minimum lot size in Suburban area (defined as outside Loop 610)

    --areas reserved for drainage/detention must have 60 feet of frontage on a street with 60 ROW (currently in for tweaking, change to 60' on 50 ROW)
    --areas reserved for Compensating Open Space (a way to have smaller lots) must have a minimum size of 12'x20'
    --in Urban areas only, can develop for townhomes with lots as small as 1400 sq ft, but are limited to 60% lot coverage and a net density of 27du/a

    And don't forget deed restrictions - if they conflict with city code, then whichever is MOST stringent applies
    "We do not need any other Tutankhamun's tomb with all its treasures. We need context. We need understanding. We need knowledge of historical events to tie them together. We don't know much. Of course we know a lot, but it is context that's missing, not treasures." - Werner Herzog, in Archaeology, March/April 2011

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Plus
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    1)
    R-1 = 60 ft.; min lot size = 6,000 sqft; lot coverage 30%; front yard 25 ft.
    R-2 through R-5 = 50 ft.; min lot size = 5,000 sqft; lot coverage = 40%

    2) Medium City; 121,000

    3) Various yrs.
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  15. #15
    Cyburbian Emeritus Chet's avatar
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    I worked for a suburban town that actually encouraged 60' wide lots of 8,000 sqaure feet. Our state law allows them as small as 60 feet and 6,000 square feet, if I recall. EDIT: Last updated 1993

    My last job, 120' wide and 12,500 - 20,000 sqaure feet was the norm. EDIT: Last updated 1963

    Wihtout sewers, most of my rural suburban client communities require an acre due to on-site sanitary codes. EDIT: Last updated 1992
    Last edited by Chet; 27 May 2005 at 6:52 PM.

  16. #16
    Cyburbian Plus
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    AIB Chet -
    Without sewers (unincorporated county) = 2.5 acres
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  17. #17
    Member Nor Cal Planner Girl's avatar
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    60 foot lot width
    population of Sonoma County (unincorporated areas)- don't know what the population is in the unincorporated areas... I would guess 85,000...?
    1989 last update

  18. #18
    Cyburbian chukky's avatar
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    1) Ten metres. (standard small lot is supposed to be 10x40, according to the council, though they tend to be either 16 or 12 perches.)
    2) Brisbane City ... about 930 000 I think.
    3) The new Small Lot Code came into effect in early 2004.

  19. #19
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by nerudite
    Just wondering... when was your bylaw updated last? Just trying to assess who has tried to implement smaller lots due to smart growth, etc. Thanks!
    By-law was reviewed and updated about 5 years ago, and those numbers are smaller then in the past.

    As noted, we do alot of exceptions, so there are SUD's on smaller lots, from what I can tell probably in the 8m range.

    Most developments advertise 40-60 foot lots as the sales feature. Need a lot that wide to fit the 3 car garage on the front of the house.
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  20. #20
    Cyburbian
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    Varies on the type of single-family zoning from 50' - 80' and on developments over 2 acres it goes to density. So if you want small lots w/ open space, or small and large lots combined you can do that, as long as you meet setbacks, minimum dwelling size and coverage requirments.

    100K+ population

    Updated 2001, uhhh... I think...

  21. #21
    Cyburbian solarstar's avatar
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    100 ft minimum width for residential, 150' for commercial, except for PUDs with central water/sewer which can go down to 40'

    "Suburban"-type County (population about 225,000)

    Code constantly being updated/revised, including today.

    (I went to U of A for grad school, and just loved Edmonton!!! Met my husband there, too!)

  22. #22
    Cyburbian Wisconsinplanner's avatar
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    Kenosha, WI
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    1) 40 feet minimum & 5,000 square feet for older residential areas (single family); 50 feet minimum and & 6,000 square feet (two-family)

    Newer areas are typically at least 70 - 80 feet & a subdivision requires no lot smaller than 8,000 square feet and an average of 10,000 square feet. It depends on the zoning district...we have 10 single/two family districts.

    2) Medium urban city, 93,000

    3) Updated continuously, but last major update was in 1987

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