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Thread: Street design policy (help with best practices)

  1. #1
    Cyburbian biscuit's avatar
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    Street design policy (help with best practices)

    Im currently working on a project that is attempting to craft new street design standards by integrating the concepts of Context Sensitive Streets; multimodal Complete Streets; Sustainably Designed Streets; and CPTED into a cohesive policy for my city. Right now everything is very much in the research phase and were having problems finding examples of best practices for both Sustainably Designed Streets and CPTED methods of street design. So if anyone out there has worked on projects in any of these areas or can point me in the direction of pics (to show the engineers that it can be done) of projects successfully using these concepts it would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member
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    Check out the book "Great Streets" for design cues to include. Traffic engineers tend to prefer streets best suited to mowing down pedestrians at high speeds.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Seattle's SEA project and the low-impact design models emanating from the Chesapeake region are the best examples of sustainable street design that I know. There is now a good deal of online information about LID, including cold-climate approaches.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  4. #4
    Cyburbian nuovorecord's avatar
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    Oregon's Transportation and Growth Management Program has a number of publications on this subject available online, free for the downloading.
    "There's nothing wrong with America that can't be fixed by what's right with America." - Bill Clinton.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian abrowne's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by 10th Avenue
    Check out the book "Great Streets" for design cues to include. Traffic engineers tend to prefer streets best suited to mowing down pedestrians at high speeds.
    I'll second this, with one caveat: although the book is absolutely brilliant and a fun read, it might not address your specific technical questions. Useful more as inspiration. The large majority of streets profiled in the book are older streets and therefore probably won't be applicable as examples of specific, modern technical street spec (i.e they wont have implemented protocol XYZ).

  6. #6
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Make the streets nine to eleven lanes wide with a center turn lane. No curbs should be used, it eliminates the need to go to the DOT or county and ask for permits. The elimination of curb cuts also allow for savings of gas as cars do not have to be channelled to specific openings. Make sure that traffic signals are timed to allow for maxiumum time for ladies to apply make-up, men to shave, or to add cream to coffee. it does not matter that there is no traffic on the cross street, make them wait anyways.

    Build giant parking lots (with enough capacity for december 20) and giant stores behind them. In the middle of the parking lots build ugly little stores that sell cell phones or *$ coffee.

    Do not provide signs or benches for transit. These things get in the way of the portable signs businesses like to line the street with to advertise their must have specials like buy 4 tans, get one free!

    Seperated sewers, while a noble idea cost too much.. besides who's gunna find out? when they do, you will be retired! Trees and landscaping require too much maintenance and put the government at fault should a drunk hit the tree. It is best to minimize these things. Besides, they get in the way of all of the overhead electrical wires strung from the telephone poles.

    If you're interested in my ideas I will be holding a seminar at the Day's Inn next week. I only charge $6,000 and will offer $50 per person discounts for large groups.


  7. #7
          quink's avatar
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    Just the name DetroitPlanner says it all.
    *ducks*

  8. #8
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Come on!!! its a joke! Sometimes planners are too dammed serious.

  9. #9

    Actually

    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner
    Come on!!! its a joke! Sometimes planners are too dammed serious.
    The streetscaping and traffic calming you are referring to are often encouaged by traffic engineers, but shot down by conservative city higher-ups, and the ideas never get to the City Commission. Get your engineers on board, including the City engineer, as that is the person who will need to sell the idea and reasoning of such a street to the "powers" that be. That will be the person that will have to convince the "higher ups" that less lanes/narrower streets/slower speeds and tree lined/well lighted boulevards are a good thing. If you need help on traffic calming or design stuff, let me know.
    Who's gonna re-invent the wheel today?

  10. #10
    Cyburbian boilerplater's avatar
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    Ah! A converted traffic engineer! The future is not so bleak after all! I've seen more good urban design schemes get screwed up by uptight, CYA protocol traffic engineers than I care to mention.

    Now back to the silliness: I'd like to add to DetroitPlanners post that no landscaping should be within 300' of a road because it may attract wildlife that can ultimately cause accidents when they try to make that proverbial crossing of the road.
    Adrift in a sea of beige

  11. #11
    maudit anglais
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    Hope this isn't too late for your needs Biscuit

    http://www.toronto.ca/wes/techservic...eets/index.htm

  12. #12

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    Two more for you, biscuit. Hopefully some of the info may be relevant for you:

    Firstly, the companion guide to PPG3 (UK government guidance on resi. development)

    http://www.odpm.gov.uk/stellent/grou...cst?n=2325&l=2

    Although this is based on resi, it has some good examples and pointers on urban design

    Secondly, the CABE (Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment) publication on quality, safe street design. Warning - the link is straight to a fairly large pdf document.

    http://www.cabe.org.uk/pdf/Paving%20the%20way.pdf

    These designs may not be to the liking of your highway engineers; theres been a running battle over the last 5 years with highway engineers and some of their ridiculous standards (apologies to any highways engineers out there!)

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