Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 33

Thread: Should the dining room and living room be eliminated?

  1. #1

    Should the dining room and living room be eliminated?

    I was recently at my brother-in-law's house in suburban Boston. It is a large house with all the typical rooms desired by people these days.(4 bedrooms, den, living room, great room, kitchen with large breakfast area, bathrooms everyplace, and basement rec-room)

    It struck me that all my suburban friends and relatives own houses like this that have two underused rooms but that none of them would do without. These would be the Living Room and the Dining Room. Over the years these rooms have slowly been downgraded and relegated to less traveled parts of the house. The living room has been replaced by the Great Room which is usually very large with cathedral ceiling and fireplace. The Dining Room has been replaced with the breakfast area. This area started out as a nook and has gradually grown quite large. It is often a buffer between the Kitchen and the Great Room.

    My brother-in-law furnishes his Living Room with some formal and fairly uninviting furniture and a piano that no one plays. It is a small square boring room with only one small window. The Dining Room is a mirror of the Living Room on the other side of the front entry vestibule (another underused space since people mostly enter through the garage). they have turned the Dining Room into a Play Room for their two kids.

    I believe this trend is due to the less and less formal way we like to live these days. These rooms are like organs in our body which through evolution no longer serve a purpose (like the appendix or the small toe). Will there come a day when developers will get up enough courage to eliminate them?

  2. #2
         
    Registered
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    3,519
    I have these same exact questions. I have a house with these rooms. My house is not as "new" however, its a 70's two-story. You walk into a foyer and to your right is a formal living room (with a 100 year old piano no one plays ) and then into a dining room, fully furnished, that has been sat in on 3 occasions (in 5 years). I have since put my computer in the front living room and tend to use the room a little more. My neighbors have remodeled theirs into an actual office. My parents also have a formal living room with ALL white furniture and glass everywhere..the kids no better than to walk in there.
    I do think some of the custom builders around here are starting to change those rooms into offices and in some cases eliminating them, but typically that is done at the request of the new home owner. I have noticed these rooms getting much smaller. I would prefer my "great room/living room" was in the front of the house but then what on earth would I do with my "other " living room with the fire place and backyard access??
    I am currently looking for a new house for exaclt the reasons stated here, I have so much wasted space that I cannot figure out what to do with. I doubt developers will ever completely eliminate the space, hopefully they will start to figure out a better use...offices seem pretty popular these days.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian dogandpony's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    84
    I suggest looking at Not so big house series of books by Sarah Susanka which addresses the both the mansionization issue, not so much from the land use zoning perspective, but from an architectural problem (large soaring cathedral ceilings with too much volume = characterless uncomforable spaces to live in). It also suggests ways to address the less formal style of living today.

    Sarah Susanka is also a frequent contributor to some of my favorite magazines, including Fine Homebuilding. She gave a talk at DePaul a few years back as part of the Chaddick Institute's program on monster houses. She made a pretty compelling case for putting money into house details instead of just "space". Accordingly, she is not necessarily preaching "cheaper" houses, since many of the details are pretty expensive and very custom. Makes for some interesting reading and insight into how houses are (or rather should be) crafted to meet the lifestyles of the occupants.

    click the link above at amazon, and you can see several pages of the book. Look at page 18, this ugly two story living room has been built 200+ times in my community, and probably yours too!

  4. #4
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    ????
    Posts
    1,184
    Convert them to something else. We are in the process of expanding our very small kitchen into our dining room (removing a wall). It will open up the entire front half of our house into a more usable and inviting space. With 2 year old twin boys, everything that is worth anything or is breakable is in storage.

  5. #5
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    at the neighboring pub
    Posts
    5,541
    My parents are pretty formal people and had the seperate formal dining room. It wasn't til their last move that they finally did away with the formal living room. We had a piano that I actually played, an upright American, so it didn't look overly formal and crossed over to the regular great room with ease.

    To give you my perspective, we did not register for China in our wedding registry because we are pretty easy-going and knew it would just waste space and never be used. I'm a big believer in buying a smaller house that is built really well with really nice appointments vs. a giant bland McMansion house with some crazy 40 foot cathedral ceiling. I see no reason why kids cannot share a room these days--I did and loved it! Smaller houses always feel more cozy and lived in if you ask me...

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  6. #6
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Staff meeting
    Posts
    8,905
    I'm agree with dogandpony. That book is a good resource for this topic.

    The only thing that needs to be reduced in most new houses isn't the name/function of any specific room, but more succinctly, the number of rooms.

    Why have the redundancy of two rooms that are "sitting watching TV" rooms (living room - great room) and same for dining room - eat in kitchen.

    I like my 1100sqft-ish 1920s apartment because it has a dining room, kitchen (not eat-in), large-ish living room and 2 bedrooms, 1 bath. The only additional spaces I need in a house is a storage basment, 3rd bedroom and extra half-bath. That can easily be accomodated within 1500 sqft (not including basement)

    I don't understand households of 4 that think they need a 3,000+ sqft house.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Cheese State
    Posts
    10,059
    I agree with eliminating the living room. It is unused space and I do not like the cathedral ceilings and other trappings they put in to make it seem more than it is. I like a comfortably-sized room for gathering in, and some smaller spaces for things like the piano or a nook for reading in. I do like a large formal dining room, though. I enjoy cooking and like having people over to dinner.

    I have come to believe that the only way I will ever find a house suited to my personality is to build it myself. I have been playing with some layouts and think I can even keep it less than 3000 square feet.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  8. #8
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 1996
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    14,672
    Blog entries
    3
    Quote Originally posted by Jaxspra
    My neighbors have remodeled theirs into an actual office. My parents also have a formal living room with ALL white furniture and glass everywhere..the kids no better than to walk in there.
    Growing up, I knew a kid who has a "white room" in his family's extremely large house. The carpet was snow white, the furnitur was snow white, the walls and ceiiling pained snow white. The room was roped off from the rest of the hosue with the same sort of diver ised for waiting lines at a bank.

    My house in Florida had a great room of about 600 to 700 square feet. It included the kitchen and the living/family area, spanning the entire depth of the house. There was a small dining rom, maybr 10'x10', off to one side of the front door; it was never used. Most newer houses I saw in Florida has such small, inconsipcuous dining rooms.

    The house here in Cleveland was built in the 1950s. It has a separate living room (at the very front of the house) and family room (at the rear). The dining room is strange; instead of being off the living room; it's between the kitchen and garage. The dining room is rather informal, with the same tile flooring as the kitchen, a built-in desk, and a sliding patio door. It's really more like a breakfast nook on steroids.

    Many of the 1920s and 1950-era houses in my neighborhood have small galley kitchens, so eating in it isn't an option; the dining room is really the only place to set up a table for eating.

    Houses in Bufalo always seem to have huge dining rooms; I always said it was because of that area's huge Catholic families. The house my parents live in, built in 1967 by an Italian homebuilder, has a typically large, prominent and central Buffalo-style dining room, fancy glass chandelier and all..

    Quote Originally posted by cardinal
    I have come to believe that the only way I will ever find a house suited to my personality is to build it myself. I have been playing with some layouts and think I can even keep it less than 3000 square feet.
    Emphasis mine. Yikes! I've got 2,200 square feet, and probably half of that space is wasted.

    The problem with a 1950s-era house is that with the exception of family rooms and attached garages, floorplans still reflected the 1920s. The bedrooms are nicely sized, but the two bathrooms are tiny. Every 1950s-era house I looked at had postage-stamp sized bathrooms. By comparison, I was able to set up a full-blown component stereo system in the main bathroom of my house in Florida. On a rack. And still have lots of room to spare. The cool thing about Florida bathrooms - they often have doors leading out to the back yard!
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    7,061
    What kills me is newer homes/apartments with closet space about equal to bedroom space, or something silly like that. New homes are not designed to LIVE in. They are designed to store all our crap.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian abrowne's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    1,584
    You folks sure need a lot of space. My four person family lives in less than 2000sq ft... I'd place it at about 1800.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    7,061
    Quote Originally posted by abrowne
    You folks sure need a lot of space. My four person family lives in less than 2000sq ft... I'd place it at about 1800.
    I am living in 825 sq. ft. with two teenagers. And their bedroom closet is completely empty and mine has an empty box from a phone I bought and 3/4's of a case of papertowels still left from the case lot sale. This place has far fewer closets than our last one and I wish it had none. And I kind of wish it were like a German apartment where there is nothing but a faucet sticking out the wall in the kitchen where the sink goes and you have to supply your own cabinets. All the cabinets here are particle board and we basically aren't using them (they off-gas and it bothers us -- if it doesn't pass the sniff test, we don't use it). I don't know what we will do but, for now, most of our dishes, cookware, and groceries are being stored on the countertops...And fridge top....

  12. #12
         
    Registered
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    3,519
    Growing up, I knew a kid who has a "white room" in his family's extremely large house. The carpet was snow white, the furnitur was snow white, the walls and ceiiling pained snow white. The room was roped off from the rest of the hosue with the same sort of diver ised for waiting lines at a bank.
    LOL, I was just talking to someone about that and my parents might as well have a rope, everyone JUMPS if the little one walks in there...God-forbid he touch one of her Waterford pieces
    Funny thing is I never grew up in that house. I grew up in a small ranch, probably about 1200 square feet, three bedrooms, one living room and one eat-in kitchen... my mom, dad, bro, and I...we all grew up there and it surely seemed like enough space to me. I never felt cramped...now however...I live in a 2200 + square foot house with my two boys it feels huge and it isnt even close to some of the houses I am seeing built around here.
    I don't see the need for the space but I doubt developers will ever completely cut the option out of their design. Its already been done, doesn't take any innovation, easy to build, probably will continue.

  13. #13
    Cyburbian natski's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2005
    Location
    In my own little bubble
    Posts
    2,564
    I think it all comes down to money- people expect that in the suburbs for the price they are going to pay for a dwelling, they get mansions- its like the bigger the better. Its like a bragging right- having a large house- even thought it may generally not be functional or neccessary, its is still BIG and i guess to most people the bigger the better.

    And more common than not, these people that own these huge house spend their lives and all their money paying off their morgages!

  14. #14
    Cyburbian AubieTurtle's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Downtown Atlanta
    Posts
    894
    One of my co-workers has a six bedroom house for just herself, her husband and one daughter. It of course also has the living room, dining room, great room and breakfest "nook". I asked why she needed all those extra bedrooms: one is an exercise room, another is her sewing/crafts rooms, one is an office, and the last is a guest room. I guess they've never heard of multipurpose spaces.

    But this is fairly typical in road happy Georgia. She's about fourty-five miles from downtown and the commute is down one of the most congested roads in the country. She doesn't see any connection between commute time and her housing choice. Traffic is the failing of the government to build enough roads and she's not willing to live in a smaller house or pay more for a similar one closer to town. Not that houses that size and poor construction quality exist intown. Anything that big in the city is going to be for the rich and built properly. It's people like this who make me think that Kunstler is probably right about everything.

    Anyway, the strange thing about most formal dining rooms I've eaten in is that typically they're not even very functional. Often they're carpeted so the formal chairs with narrows legs tend to wobble and sink unevenly. The large table usually doesn't match the ratio of the walls of the room causing two sides to feel cramped. And if there is a high ceiling, once again the ratio is all wrong and I feel more like I'm eating in a foyer rather than a dining room.
    As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron. - H.L. Mencken

  15. #15
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    7,061
    Quote Originally posted by natski
    I think it all comes down to money-
    The financial and policy infrastructure in the U.S. is a significant factor in the ballooning size of new homes. I have commented on that more than once in this forum. Some folks are sick of hearing it.

    Thoughts on housing in "Georgia" (Atlanta): My sister lives in the Atlanta area. Initially, they rented a house about a mile from the skyscrapers....in a neighborhood that was still legally part of the "county". They wanted to be close in to avoid the long commutes and she figured the higher rent was off-set by the lower gas, tolls, etc. The neighborhood of Sandysprings has debated whether or not to incorporate as it's own little town for more than a decade. My sister's house had city water but further down her street people had septic tanks. Like most modern americans, they had the usual TV, computer, microwave, etc. in a 50 year old house. Sometimes if you had several things on and ran the microwave, you blew the fuses. When they decided to buy, they wanted something newer, etc. They ended up going farther out. In spite of having only one child and NOT wanting a big house, she ended up buying a 4 bedroom. With the financial constraints they had, a new sprawling mini-mansion was one of the few things within their price range. Other options included an older home that needed a LOT of work -- work she could not do as she was still recovering from cancer treatment. She needed a house that was in move-in condition, not one that would suit her needs in a couple of years only if she also had the energy to renovate it herself -- because she didn't have that kind of energy.

    I think when you know someone well, you get a different picture about why they made their choices than if you know them more superficially. Coworkers or casual acquaintances are unlikely to give you the Low Down on their finances, health situation, etc. You probably wouldn't want to know them that well anyway. Or want to invest the time required to learn that much about them.

    As for the dining room and living room question: the housing industry is very conservative. It tends to change rather slowly. Single folks buy 3 bedroom homes because they sell better. Retired couples buy homes near good schools because they sell better. Folks who have no need for schools, extra bedrooms, dining rooms, and living rooms, buy houses with those things so their house will go up in value and they won't be stuck with a white elephant when they need to move. It is rare that someone has both a lifestyle that will allow them to do something else with ease and also the clarity to see it as an opportunity. On a homeschooling list I am on, someone said that they had trouble finding a real estate agent who would take them seriously that "good schools were NOT a priority". They finally found one who would listen, gave the person their "wish list" for a house, and found a much bigger, nicer house than any of the ones they had been shown in their price range near "good schools". As a bonus, all their neighbors are retirees, artists, and other assorted weirdos, giving them a rich and lively community in which to raise their kids.

    As for me: in spite of the fact that I prefer to have less Stuff and I have always desired a spartan life and Like to "travel light", I have too much psychological baggage about social expectations, etc. However, recent extreme circumstances are freeing me to pare down drastically. Most people aren't generally granted so much psychological freedom from outside expectations.

  16. #16
    Cyburbian Queen B's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2003
    Location
    "Somewhere in the middle"
    Posts
    3,172
    I agree that I don't believe they will be eliminated. Pesonally I have never had the luxury to have a livingroom and family room. I would like to try that. We certainly LIVE in our living room. We have a dining room only because of family keepsake furniture and had to buy a house that fit that. We have used it a few times to eat but I would rather have someplace more comfortable to sit.
    We have a 5 bedroom house with 4 of us at times. We converted one of the upstairs bedrooms into a laundry. I am not hauling laundry up and down stairs any more. Love it on the second floor so there is none of that.

    I guess my next question would be???? What do you think about converting two small bedrooms to one big one. Do you think that hurts the resale??? There are so many houses out there with dinky bedrooms. I would just a soon sell a two bedroom house with nice sized rooms as three tiny ones.
    It is all a matter of perspective!!!

  17. #17
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    9,327
    This Bear's house was built in the 1920's. Each floor is small, which is fine with me, for the most part. The main level has the living room - dining room combination, created when previous owners knocked a wall out. The dining room is where I plop by bod so I can hassle all the residents of Cyburbia. This dining room also includes a nice built-in-buffet, with windows overlooking the side yard.

    The kitchen is small, but functional. I also would like to knock the wall down between the kitchen and the dining room.....giving the main floor a more open feel. To do that means I lose our double-door closet, used for coats, etc. I still have a single door closet in the dining room, but, because the bedrooms have no real closet space all of my clothing is in that dining room closet.

    There are three (3) really small bedrooms upstairs, a bedroom on the main floor. The house only has one (1) bathroom.....fine for a 3-person family. The full basement is where my step-son now makes his "home". It is "moderately" fixed-up.

    I do have a huge 2-story garage. Probably goes against all the rules of Cyburbia, but it is "my space" for putzing around, listening to loud rock and roll music. The upstairs is still only partially finished. I plan to make the garage upstairs into a huge model railroad room. If I ever kick this dang Cyburbia habit.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  18. #18
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
    Registered
    May 2005
    Location
    The Fox Valley
    Posts
    4,929
    Blog entries
    1

    combined dining and breakfast

    I live in a 3 bedroom home that was built in 1996. It is probably the cheapest/smallest of the larger homes in the subdivison. It has no breakfast area, or sliding glass doors. Instead, the kitchen is a U-shaped counter space with a triangle formed by the location of the applianes. Yes, it is cramped and not ideal for buffets or Emeril/Rachel Ray. But it serves its purpose...food preparation. Still...we wish we had a pantry. We then use the dining room located right next to it, as both casual breakfast nook, family dinner table , and fancy dinner area via table leafs (Thanksgiving). Then, you go down four steps to the Family Room level, which has the back door, and the laundry/garage/basement hallway. Back on the first level is a living room which we use for family discussion, relaxing after work, etc. The family room is primarily for watching TV, my dog's crate, extra seating for large parties, and Christmas present opening. So in my house, both living and family rooms are essential. The breakfast nook, however, is completely unnecessary.
    Last edited by illinoisplanner; 16 Jun 2005 at 12:22 AM. Reason: wording
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
    -Steven Tyler

  19. #19
    Cyburbian abrowne's avatar
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    1,584
    Quote Originally posted by Michele Zone
    I am living in 825 sq. ft. with two teenagers. And their bedroom closet is completely empty and mine has an empty box from a phone I bought and 3/4's of a case of papertowels still left from the case lot sale. This place has far fewer closets than our last one and I wish it had none. And I kind of wish it were like a German apartment where there is nothing but a faucet sticking out the wall in the kitchen where the sink goes and you have to supply your own cabinets. All the cabinets here are particle board and we basically aren't using them (they off-gas and it bothers us -- if it doesn't pass the sniff test, we don't use it). I don't know what we will do but, for now, most of our dishes, cookware, and groceries are being stored on the countertops...And fridge top....
    I was wrong. It's actually 1300sq ft. *shrug* It feels bigger.

    There is quite the movement afoot for low-offgas or no-offgas building, but it hasn't gathered as much momentum as I would have hoped. But surely the offgassing cabinets bother you regardless of whether or not you store your dishes in them? I mean, the problem is still there, right?

  20. #20
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2001
    Location
    West Valley, AZ
    Posts
    3,895
    Quote Originally posted by abrowne
    You folks sure need a lot of space. My four person family lives in less than 2000sq ft... I'd place it at about 1800.
    My 5 person family is in 1800 sq ft Now who's being efficent?

    Edit: Oops, see you still have me beat. I still believe my fam could be comfortable in less space.

    On topic, I like seperate rooms. One large cavernous great kitching room does little to help seperate the noises of the kids cartoons from the quiet adult conversation that is occuring while the parents fix dinner in the kitchen area. Also, it seems these dining areas are designed to keep the big-screen TV in plain sight from all three of these sub rooms. With seperate rooms, I don't have this problem.

    I have never understood the function of a living room. We've made our "living room" into a reading/play room. We made our sunroom into our TV/Computer area. The sunroom is a nice cozy space (8x15) with our 20 inch tv and couch big enough to hold the family.
    Last edited by boiker; 16 Jun 2005 at 4:49 AM. Reason: abrownes revised sq ft.
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

  21. #21
    Cyburbian Boru's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2004
    Location
    At the dining table
    Posts
    235
    Separate rooms such as dining rooms, breakfast rooms etc are being phased out here due to spaace constraints. However there seems to be a split in the forms of housing being built in Ireland at the moment.

    1) Due to the acknowledged need to provide higher densities after 30-40 years of standard 8 houses to the acre. These houses are generally 3 bedroom homes (one ensuite) with a bathroom, a kitchen/living room and another room (study, additional living room, store-everything-you-have-collected-since-you-were-7-years-of-age-room). These generally average at between 1,500 to 1,800 sq. ft.

    Builders of these homes are now doing away with chimneys, and timber built homes now account for about 30% of new builds. 10 years ago they would have been unheard of "what can he not afford some bricks?"

    2) In complete defiance of good planning, some people are constructing large to huge houses. These start at about 3,000sq. ft. They come with far to many rooms for an average family to need, unless they want to pass through their daily lives without making contact with each other. Who really needs a games room for gods sake? In addition each bedroom has a bathroom, a large garage, etc, etc, basically the MTV "cribs" lifestyle. At least a certain amount of houses this size can be accommodated on large land holdings, but now they are being constructed in "exclusive housing developments" at the edge of any settlements within commuting distance of any city. They are all car-dependant to boot.

    I'm sorry to have to say it but its the importation of the American way to live. Which in itself may not be a bad thing as this is obviously what some people desire, but when put into the context of a small country with limited space, its storing up problems in a big way.

  22. #22

    Registered
    May 1997
    Location
    Williston, VT
    Posts
    1,371
    We have had to struggle to fill up and furnish our 1266 SF house. It will eventually look occupied if we stay here long enough, I guess. Though we can't fill the space, however, we would love to have a pantry off the kitchen. But people who eat only prepared food probably wouldn't notice the absence of a pantry. Persuading people to live in smaller homes is all about careful design, but preferences vary so much that is a real challenge.

  23. #23
    Member
    Registered
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Mouseton, Calisota
    Posts
    50
    Quote Originally posted by boiker
    On topic, I like seperate rooms. One large cavernous great kitching room does little to help seperate the noises of the kids cartoons from the quiet adult conversation that is occuring while the parents fix dinner in the kitchen area. Also, it seems these dining areas are designed to keep the big-screen TV in plain sight from all three of these sub rooms. With seperate rooms, I don't have this problem.
    I also like separate rooms. I always liked what I've seen in some Victorian houses. Having rooms separated by large double pocket doors. When the doors are opened, it becomes one large space, when closed, it becomes two separate rooms. Someday I plan on buying an old house since those tend to have what I actually want in a house. I'd rather have nice woodwork, built-ins, and a porch instead of huge cathedral cielings and a three car garage.

    I think the modern incarnations of the living room and dining room are obsolete. But if you build a house without them, then why not just call the great room and breakfast area the living room and dining room? That's what they are, after all. I always assumed that if a house only had one room that people "live" in, then it is a living room, if it has two of these rooms, then one is the living room and the other is a family or great room. The same holds true for the dining and breakfast rooms.

  24. #24
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Cheese State
    Posts
    10,059
    Quote Originally posted by Lee Nellis
    We have had to struggle to fill up and furnish our 1266 SF house. It will eventually look occupied if we stay here long enough, I guess. Though we can't fill the space, however, we would love to have a pantry off the kitchen. But people who eat only prepared food probably wouldn't notice the absence of a pantry. Persuading people to live in smaller homes is all about careful design, but preferences vary so much that is a real challenge.
    I would love a big pantry. It is one of the best ideas in housing to be abandoned. It would be great to have that storage space, and even to put in a freezer, if not the refridgerator as well.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  25. #25
    Cyburbian jordanb's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    City of Low Low Wages!
    Posts
    3,235
    Off-topic:
    Quote Originally posted by Cardinal
    I would love a big pantry. It is one of the best ideas in housing to be abandoned. It would be great to have that storage space, and even to put in a freezer, if not the refridgerator as well.
    My father grew up in a rural area and still has that mentality. So my parents' house has a fridge/freezer in the kitchen, plus another fridge/freezer and a deep freeze in the garage. They're all always full. Plus they have a pantry in the laundry room that's nearly always full of canned goods and other staples. I think at any given time my parents have a good two months worth of food on hand.

    I have a fridge/freezer that I keep pretty empty, and one cabnet that I use as a pantry. Generally if I get hungry for something I go to the store and buy it right then. If I want to make something I just take the recepie to the store and use it as my shopping list.

+ Reply to thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 1
    Last post: 07 Feb 2010, 11:42 PM
  2. Room for idealism?
    Career Development and Advice
    Replies: 13
    Last post: 21 Jul 2007, 12:49 PM
  3. Definitions Definition of a tea room
    Land Use and Zoning
    Replies: 3
    Last post: 10 Oct 2006, 6:52 PM
  4. Replies: 15
    Last post: 04 Sep 2004, 7:28 PM
  5. Replies: 40
    Last post: 23 Sep 2003, 4:09 PM