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Thread: Can Australia gather some form and win the Ashes?

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    Cyburbian natski's avatar
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    Can Australia gather some form and win the Ashes?

    For anyone that has a little bit of interest in Australia's national sport!

    The past couple of days has been dissapointing, seeing Australia get their butts kicked- What hope do we have of pulling together some form and beating the poms?

    Is it that we are playing crap or do England actually have a ok side this time?

    and what is doing with Symonds/Warne?!

  2. #2
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by natski
    For anyone that has a little bit of interest in Australia's national sport!
    Sorry to be a dumb and ugly American, but to which sport are you referring?
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  3. #3
          quink's avatar
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    It's the horrible abomination known as Cricket.

    And, yeah, I hate all kinds of Sport that are on TV here. Fortunately, though, I wouldn't be able to name any AFL/NRL/Union player, which is something I'm very happy about. . Skiing is good (Nordic and Alpine), Formula 1 was good about 5 years ago and Curling isn't too bad either.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian MitchBaby's avatar
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    I think the Aussies will get their game together, a hell of a lot better than the Canadians anyhow... yes, apparently Canada has a team there - but we're not expected to do very well...

    No, I think the Aussie's will, with their green and yellow shirts, will win their tests.
    Mitchbaby: Proud to be a :canada: planner and a :canada: surfer

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    Quote Originally posted by natski
    For anyone that has a little bit of interest in Australia's national sport!

    The past couple of days has been dissapointing, seeing Australia get their butts kicked- What hope do we have of pulling together some form and beating the poms?

    Is it that we are playing crap or do England actually have a ok side this time?

    and what is doing with Symonds/Warne?!
    Fantastic. Another cricket fan.

    In answer to your final question, a bit of both. You've not been playing that well (especially the bowlers), but England have the best team they've had in years. We are comfortably no.2 in the world now (behind yourselves, obviously) and the recent run of results, battering the Windies in the Caribbean, beating South Africa at their place has given us a lot of confidence.

    I'm sure that you'll pull yourselves together soon, and I'm looking forward to once the Ashes start - hopefully should be a great series.

    Symonds broke the team curfew I believe and there was lots of 'revelations' about the Pie Man in the Sunday papers.

    I have to admit I did laugh when you were beaten by Bangladesh though (I'm enjoying it while it lasts)

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    Rule Britannia

    the aussies time as rulers on the world cricket field is over! well i hope so anyway, england look like a hungry, strong team who can definately compete with the aussies now after 2 decades of medioicre to poor quality cricket.

    the likes of flintoff, strauss, peitersen and goughy are match winners. but i never underestimate the strong sporting mentality of the aussies, even when they lose they don't leave without a fight. i reckon it will come down to the fifth test in the Ashes.

    as an england fan, who has toured with the barmy army in australia in '99 i am not getting carried away with one day matches, but i am enjoying seeing the aussie boat rock! i remember sitting in the MCG in melbourne and WACCA in Perth getting taunted by what i percieved as an arrogant home crowd. so i would truly love to put one over you guys, just like we did in the rugby world cup! the reality is though i think you'll recover in time for the first test.

    Prediction: 3-2 england to win the series!

    ps. if any yanks outhere don't have a clue what we're talking about or care, at least check out a cricket day/night match between england and australia this month on fox sports or something and you'll be instantly hooked on this sport!

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Boru's avatar
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    ps. if any yanks outhere don't have a clue what we're talking about or care, at least check out a cricket day/night match between england and australia this month on fox sports or something and you'll be instantly hooked on this sport![/QUOTE]

    Lets not go nuts with the "sports" misnomer. Pastime would be more appropriate.

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    Quote Originally posted by Boru
    QUOTE]
    Lets not go nuts with the "sports" misnomer. Pastime would be more appropriate.
    A fine gentlemanly sport I would say Boru. There can be few better pleasures than wiling away a summers day with a few nice pints of bitter whilst watching a lovely game of cricket. Ah, the sound of leather on willow, the smell of freshly cut grass - these are the things an English summer is made of.

    (I realise I'm possibly going to get some stick about the above, particularly the leather/willow thing. I'm ready for it )

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Boru's avatar
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    You asked for it!

    Quote Originally posted by noj
    A fine gentlemanly sport I would say Boru. There can be few better pleasures than wiling away a summers day with a few nice pints of bitter whilst watching a lovely game of cricket. Ah, the sound of leather on willow, the smell of freshly cut grass - these are the things an English summer is made of.

    (I realise I'm possibly going to get some stick about the above, particularly the leather/willow thing. I'm ready for it )
    So Noj, theres nothing you like better of a summers day than getting hopped up on booze, inhaling fresh grass and reclining to watch leather clad objects being thrashed for six by willow paddles. Hmmm. And these thrashings can go on for hours, even days you say, with both sides getting a go. Thats enough of that.

    The area I live in has a beautiful cricket ground, one of the best in Ireland. Unfortunately cricket teams are as rare as hens teeth around here, so the opportunity to watch or develop a love for the game has never really happened. It has basically led to good Irish players declaring for England (a la Ed Joyce), which is slightly odd.

    I must head up to the club on Saturday and see if I can while away the afternoon on the pavilion so.

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    Fact: more people play cricket in the world than baseball, which says something. Plus, all sports are past times for those who aren't paid for playing.

    Agreed Noj, with the exception of Wimbledon tennis, nothing beats a hot english summers day watching the game from dawn til dusk, singing one's heart out as the traditional ale flows and the leather balls are being sprayed around the lush grass field.

    ps. this turning into a poetry session

  11. #11
          quink's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by pommyplanner
    ... singing one's heart out as the traditional ale flows ...
    For those who don't know cricket, this is the only exciting thing that happens throughout a typical five-day (yeah, really) match. The record's at nine days. The spectators getting so drunk nobody knows who's doing what again.

    Yes, I hate Cricket. And football. And, yes, I am in Australia.

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    Quote Originally posted by quink
    For those who don't know cricket, this is the only exciting thing that happens throughout a typical five-day (yeah, really) match. The record's at nine days. The spectators getting so drunk nobody knows who's doing what again.

    Yes, I hate Cricket. And football. And, yes, I am in Australia.
    Although to be fair quink, I imagine the nine day game happened a very long time ago, before the modern rules were invented. Part of the attraction for me about cricket is that nothing much can happen for days, and then everything happens at once. The fact that two teams can play for five days, sometimes one quite obviously better than the other, and draw. Sometimes there are no winners. (check me out, being deep )

  13. #13
    I hate to admit it but my limited knowledge of cricket comes from one of the Hitchiker's books. It appears that the late Mr. Adams either liked the sport and wanted to spoof it, or really hated it.
    When did I go from Luke Skywalker to Obi-Wan Kenobi?

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    Quote Originally posted by Whose Yur Planner
    I hate to admit it but my limited knowledge of cricket comes from one of the Hitchiker's books. It appears that the late Mr. Adams either liked the sport and wanted to spoof it, or really hated it.
    Fair enough WYP, unfortunately I know very little about baseball (or American Football for that matter). I think Douglas Adams was a big cricket fan, as far as I recall.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian jordanb's avatar
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    I'm a big fan of baseball and I've always wanted to "figure out" cricket. I've read a lot of online explanations of the rules but still don't have a good grasp of how things progress.

    A friend of mine in Canberra was going to videotape a match and mail it to me, but we got into trouble with PAL vs. NTSC.

    Cable TV (Fox sports) doesn't work for me because I don't have cable.

    I wish the latinos played cricket. There are two spanish channels in Chicago and I can get way more than my fill of soccer off of them.

    BTW: About Cricket, Soccer, etc. in England. Why is it that England invents all these sports and then proceeds to suck at them?

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    Quote Originally posted by jordanb
    BTW: About Cricket, Soccer, etc. in England. Why is it that England invents all these sports and then proceeds to suck at them?
    I wish I could answer that question jordanb. Basically I think we invent sports so that at least initially we can be the best at them. Once the rest of the world notices them and becomes better than us, we have to invent another one

    I'd like to get into baseball, but unfortunately its only shown at about 3am on a TV channel I don't get.

  17. #17
    Cyburbian Boru's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by noj
    I wish I could answer that question jordanb. Basically I think we invent sports so that at least initially we can be the best at them. Once the rest of the world notices them and becomes better than us, we have to invent another one

    I'd like to get into baseball, but unfortunately its only shown at about 3am on a TV channel I don't get.
    Dont worry, you're still pretty good at "Curling" and "Rolling lumps of cheese down Cooper's Hill". I was at a baseball match in San Francisco a few years ago, and i picked it up, but then forgot it, due to the fact that nobody shows it on the tube here. That was also the first place where i was introduced to the idea of a smoking ban in a huge outdoor stadium, which boggled my mind at the time. Now its everywhere. Sob!

  18. #18
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    [QUOTE=Boru]Dont worry, you're still pretty good at "Curling" and "Rolling lumps of cheese down Cooper's Hill".

    also, not forgetting rugby union we're currently world champions at that! but its true we did invent many ball sports like soccer, cricket, rugby union and league, squash, golf. I wouldn't say we suck at them though, currently we are:
    soccer (8th)
    cricket (2nd)
    rugby union (1st)
    rugby league (2nd)
    squash (2nd)
    and golf (...err ok 13th)

    On top of that we invented the world famous Bognor Birdham Flying Championships! held near my home town in bognor regis this year, i highly recommend this funny web link, its an annual competetion where people fling themsleves off a pier into the english channel in man made propelled flying craft!
    :

    www.birdman.org.uk/

    ps. and we're currently world record holders at this!

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    Quote Originally posted by Boru
    Dont worry, you're still pretty good at "Curling" and "Rolling lumps of cheese down Cooper's Hill". I was at a baseball match in San Francisco a few years ago, and i picked it up, but then forgot it, due to the fact that nobody shows it on the tube here. That was also the first place where i was introduced to the idea of a smoking ban in a huge outdoor stadium, which boggled my mind at the time. Now its everywhere. Sob!

    Without wishing to be a pedant, Boru, I think you'll find that we're crap at Curling. the Scots are very good though.

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    Things hotting up now in the series, getting through the one day games and will soon be on to the main event of the Ashes themselves.

    Great game last night, even though it was cruelly ended by the weather. Good to see the temperature rising on the pitch too - Hayden having a little mardy attack when he was hit by the ball. Hopefully England will carry on winding up Hayden, as he usually gets out soon after throwing his toys out of the pram

    I've also changed my avatar in honour of the up-coming series.

  21. #21
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Duh, why do they call it the Ashes?
    Duh, whats a test match?
    Duh, is cricket more popular in the UK than football?

    Some annoying limey should get a primer going for us ignorant Yanks and clue us in as to whats so great about cricket (and feel free to incorporate terms like 'kicky', 'loo', 'bird', 'pram', and 'petrol' - just go right ahead )
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Quote Originally posted by Maister
    Duh, why do they call it the Ashes?
    Duh, whats a test match?
    Duh, is cricket more popular in the UK than football?

    Some annoying limey should get a primer going for us ignorant Yanks and clue us in as to whats so great about cricket (and feel free to incorporate terms like 'kicky', 'loo', 'bird', 'pram', and 'petrol' - just go right ahead )
    An annoying limey writes;

    Maister, cricket is not as popular as football here; its probably about joint second favourite along with Rugby (Union). It is the traditional sport of the English summer though. The game is popular throughout most of the old 'Commonwealth' (with the exception of Canada probably - is this a fair comment Canadians?); Natski refers to it as Australia's national game at the start of the thread, and it is the national game of most of the Asian subcontinent (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh).

    The game largely takes two forms; one day matches where the two teams bat and bowl for 50 overs (usually) in one day, and test matches where the game lasts for five days (if needed) and each team bats and bowls twice (called an innings). The Ashes series takes place every four years between England and Australia and consists of 5 test matches, so 25 days in total. The series alternates between being held in the two countries, and each test is held at a different venue in the country. This time it is being held in England, and test matches will be held in London, Birmingham, Nottingham, Manchester and Leeds.

    The England -Australia series is called the 'Ashes' as the first time England lost to Australia in the series (in 18 something or other) an English newspaper in typically reactionary style showed a picture of the wicket on fire on the front page and called it "the death of English cricket". The ashes from the bails (small pieces of wood on top of the wicket) were put in a small urn and became the trophy for whoever won the series.

    Australia have been the number 1 team in the world since about the late 1980s (taking over from the West Indies) and are still the best team in the world. Ths series this year is exciting though as England have the best team they have had in a long time (no. 2 in the world)

    I love cricket, me. The game is the perfect game to watch in the summer with a few cheeky pints of bitter. It is extremely tactical and a good team can become great with a good captain (and vice versa), who responds to the game after each ball, moving field placings, instructing the bowler to bowl to different areas etc. One of the reasons that England are good at the moment is because our captain (Vaughan) is very good, and probably only second to Fleming (the Kiwi captain) as a captain at the moment.

    As far as I'm aware, the game has several similarities with baseball, although I guess the primary difference is that the games can go for so long and no result is guaranteed. Unlike American sports where it seems like there always has to be a winner, a cricket game can go on for five days and end in a draw (indeed this is part of the appeal to me).

    Oh, and just for you, Maister, theres normally a queue for the loos at the big Ashes game as the day is normally filled with drinking. Theres more and more birds going to the games nowadays, which is good, but I don't think I've ever seen a pram and I normally take the train to allow drinking and save on petrol. (and I have no idea what 'kicky' means!)

  23. #23
    maudit anglais
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    Quote Originally posted by noj
    The game is popular throughout most of the old 'Commonwealth' (with the exception of Canada probably - is this a fair comment Canadians?)
    Yep - 'though it is becoming more popular. We even made it to the World Cup last year!

    My high school had a cricket team as we had a large Carribean student population - I was the only kid not from that group who went out for it. Didn't make the team - gave up as I can't bowl to save my life. I couldn't stop trying to throw the ball like a baseball.

  24. #24
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Thank you for the excellent primer (although in retrospect I forgot to request that you use the term 'slapper'. Sorry.)

    Baseball has traditionally billed itself as being America's #1 sport, but has lost considerable ground over the last couple decades to other sports (American football, basketball, Nascar, etc.). A couple of baseball strikes have done little to improve favor with the fans.

    You like cricket because it is very 'tactical'. There is a fair degree of strategy to baseball (which shares historic roots with cricket and some other game called 'rounders'), but I would guess most Yanks get their strategy fix through either college or NFL football. I also think it is interesting that one of the reasons that cricket appeals to you is that it can take so long and that it is possible not to have a winner. I would guess these are two big reasons why cricket ISN'T more popular here in the States. We Yanks have notoriously short attention spans and I have heard it said that one of the reasons that soccer hasn't become a bigger spectator sport is because there are so few moments of decisive resolution.

    The fact that most matches are major boozefests for the fans might have considerable appeal, however.
    Oh, one other question - who are the fans of cricket vs. football (soccer)? Is it fairly universal or would you say there is more appeal of one sport over the other along class lines at all?
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Quote Originally posted by Maister
    Thank you for the excellent primer (although in retrospect I forgot to request that you use the term 'slapper'. Sorry.)

    You're welcome mate. Although I'm not sure I could legitimately get away with using 'slapper' on this website, as it is fairly derogatory (using 'bird' was verging on borderline!).

    Quote Originally posted by Maister
    You like cricket because it is very 'tactical'. There is a fair degree of strategy to baseball (which shares historic roots with cricket and some other game called 'rounders'), but I would guess most Yanks get their strategy fix through either college or NFL football. I also think it is interesting that one of the reasons that cricket appeals to you is that it can take so long and that it is possible not to have a winner. I would guess these are two big reasons why cricket ISN'T more popular here in the States. We Yanks have notoriously short attention spans and I have heard it said that one of the reasons that soccer hasn't become a bigger spectator sport is because there are so few moments of decisive resolution.
    Is this actually true? (I ask sincerely). I have heard this before about football/soccer and always assumed it was a bit stereotypical. About the time of the football world cup in the States in 1994 there was lots of talk of messing the game around (introducing quarters, making the goals bigger, overtime until a winner etc) to make the game more palatable to US audiences but none of these things came to pass (apart from a fudge job on the overtime), and the World Cup seemed to be a big success then. I read an article on some bloke who was trying to start cricket in the States, and he was changing some of the rules such as changing an 'over' to 5 deliveries instead of the 6 as it is now so that it made more 'sense' to Americans. I always assumed that this was a little patronising.

    Quote Originally posted by Maister
    The fact that most matches are major boozefests for the fans might have considerable appeal, however.
    Oh, one other question - who are the fans of cricket vs. football (soccer)? Is it fairly universal or would you say there is more appeal of one sport over the other along class lines at all.
    Boozefests - now you're talking! The class question is an interesting one. The common perception is that cricket is a little more higher class sport than football, more akin to Rugby (union anyway, not league which is primarily a working class sport). A lot of it depends I think on where you grow up. For instance at my secondary school, which was a state school (paid for by taxes and provided by the government) we played football in the winter and cricket in the summer. At the private schools in the County they played Rugby Union and cricket, so I have always considered Rugby to be a 'posh' sport. In other counties, it was different though, and certainly in different countries (for instance Rugby Union is the national sport in Wales, and covers all classes). As an aside, interestingly, Welsh cricket players appear for England under the English banner. There is normally one or two in the team (at the moment there are two).

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