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Thread: Park planning - parking generation

  1. #1

    Park Planning - PARKING GENERATION

    I know ITE (Institute of Transportation Engineers) has an excellent parking generation guide for many land uses. However, specific recreational uses are not covered. I know there are many variables that would be factored into a recommended number. Nonetheless, has anyone seen anything (have their own policy) regarding parking generation for park facilites?
    In particular I am looking for parking numbers on Little League baseball diamonds, High School Baseball diamonds, High School softball fields, little league softball fields, High school soccer fields, a BMX track, a shuffleboard court, a 100' x 75' playground area. Please let me know if there is a guide or site that could help me out. Any info provided would be more than I have now.
    Who's gonna re-invent the wheel today?

  2. #2
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    A good number for of spaces for field sports is 50 spaces/field. Check out the http://www.co.fairfax.va.us/parks/ website. I used to do some park planning for them. Most jurisdictions recommend 35 spaces but FCPA found that in reality 50 spaces is much better.

  3. #3
    At Texas Parks & Wildlife, we also are faced with programming parking lots for widely-varying recreational sites. Since actual attendance for a given facility varies depending on many factors, I recommend projecting attendance first, then dividing by the number of persons per vehicle you expect.

    In Ian Keirle's "Countryside Recreation Site Management", he quotes Bell's "Design for Outdoor Recreation," which includes the following formula:

    # of parking spaces = (# of visits X avg. length of stay) / (avg. # of people in a car X avg. daily period for which the site is in use)

    I used this on an historical site, but it came out lower than I expected, but then, it is British, not American. My value estimates could have been wrong, too.

    Another way to do it is to count parking spots taken at an event at an existing facility. It might be easiest to count the total number of parking spaces on an aerial photo. That gives you an idea not only of how many spaces have been used before, but whether it was appropriate for the use in your area.

    Overall, I recommend erring on the low side, but designing roads wide enough to allow overflow parallel parking, or a grassy field that could be used for overflow. Also, design the parking lot in a manner that it could be expanded if needed in the future.

  4. #4

    Thanks

    # of parking spaces = (# of visits X avg. length of stay) / (avg. # of people in a car X avg. daily period for which the site is in use)

    I used this on an historical site, but it came out lower than I expected, but then, it is British, not American. My value estimates could have been wrong, too.

    1. Another way to do it is to count parking spots taken at an event at an existing facility. It might be easiest to count the total number of parking spaces on an aerial photo. That gives you an idea not only of how many spaces have been used before, but whether it was appropriate for the use in your area.

    2. Overall, I recommend erring on the low side, but designing roads wide enough to allow overflow parallel parking, or a grassy field that could be used for overflow. Also, design the parking lot in a manner that it could be expanded if needed in the future.[/QUOTE]

    First I would like to thank you for the formula provided, Engineers love that crap.
    1. We can do this, but it still varies, due to the event. We have 5 ball diamonds and 186 spaces. We know it is not enough, but by how much is what eludes us. With tourneys and larger events (when all diamonds are full), we can be short 50-100 spaces.
    2. The only road is the entrance to the lot, the geometric shape is an arc, or semi-circle, which does not play well to maximizing the # of spaces/sq ft. of land. We are trying to work with what we have.
    We are looking at adding 4 more fields, therefore we are looking at what we may need to add. I didn't think there was an actual guide, as I understand that there is many factors that play into this. I thought it was worth a shot.
    Who's gonna re-invent the wheel today?

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